Location: Stafford County VA

Potomac Tribe

A small group of families, whose names are mostly Newton and Green (figs. 40, 41), represent what may be the Indians who are recorded to Potomac creek, an affluent of about eight miles north of Fredericksburg in Stafford County, Virginia. We have not, however, clear proof that these descendants are actually of Potomac identity, although they now bear the name. They are not organized definitely, nor are their numbers known, except for a rough estimate which would put them at about 150. Like most of the tidewater bands, they are engaged chiefly in fishing. Hunting has been discontinued only...

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Biography of Robert M. Bronaugh

Robert M. Bronaugh of Baileyville had been a factor in the life of Kansas for considerably more than half a century. His people were in fact territorial pioneers. He fought when the country needed his fighting ability as a young man during the Civil war, and after that took up farming and latterly business connections with Baileyville, where he is still a merchant and is vice president of the Baileyville State Bank. He comes of old French stock and of aristocratic ancestry in America. Mr. Bronaugh was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, May 6, 1844. His paternal ancestors some generations back were Huguenots who emigrated from France to England and from there came to America and located near Fredericksburg, Virginia. In the old Dominion they became planters and slave holders. Mr. Bronaugh’s grandfather bore the name Taliaferro Bronaugh, and he was born near Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1776, the year the Declaration of Independence was signed. In 1801 he crossed the mountains and became a Kentucky pioneer. He was a farmer and planter, raised large quantities of tobaeco, and worked his plantation with the aid of slaves. He died near Hopkinsville, Kentucky, in 1863. He also kept a country hotel for a number of years. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Thomas Bronaugh, father of Robert M., was born near Hopkinsville, Kentucky, in 1805. He grew up and...

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Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties. Ontponea, in Orange County. Shackaconia, on the south bank of the Rappahannock River in Spottsylvania County. Stegaraki, on the Rapidan River in Orange County. Tanxnitania, on the north side of the upper Rappahannock River in Fauquier County. Tegninateo, in Culpeper County, at the head of the Rappahannock River. Whonkentia, in Fauquier County, near the head of the Rappahannock. Manahoac Villages: Mahaskahod, on the Rappahannock River, probably near Fredericksburg, is the only town known by name. Manahoac History. Traditional evidence points to an early home of the Manahoac people in the Ohio Valley. In 1608 John Smith discovered them in the location above given and learned that they with the Monacan but at war with the Powhatan Indians and the Iroquois (or perhaps rather the Susquehanna). After...

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Manahoac Tribe

Manahoac Indians (Algonquian: ‘they are very merry.’ – Tooker). A confederacy or group of small tribes or bands possibly Siouan, in north Virginia, in 1608, occupying the country from the falls of the rivers to the mountains and from the Potomac to North Anna river. They were at war with the Powhatan and Iroquois, and in alliance with the Monacan, but spoke a language different from any of their neighbors.  Among their tribes Smith mentions the Manahoac, Tanxnitania, Shackaconia, Ontponea, Tegninateo, Whonkenti, Stegaraki, and Hassinunga, and says there were others.  Jefferson confounded them with the Tuscarora.  Mahaskahod is the only one of their villages of which the name has been preserved.  Others may have borne the names of the tribes of the confederacy.  The Mahocks mentioned by Lederer in 1669 seem to be identical to them. Manahoac Tribe. A tribe or band of the Manahoac group.  According to Jefferson they lived on Rappahannock river in Stafford and Spottsylvania Counties, Va. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Manahoac as both an ethnological study, and as a people. Mooney, Siouan Tribes of the East, 18, 1894....

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Biography of Henry E. Jones, M. D.

The subject of this brief memoir, was born in Steuben, Oneida county, New York, in 1837, and is the third child in a family of nine children of Hugh W. and Sarah (Smith) Jones. His early life was spent on a farm and during his youth his educational advantages were of the most limited nature. The humble circumstances of his parents, with a large family to provide for, made it impossible to give their children anything but the most meager opportunities for gaining an education. Until after our subject had reached his majority most of his time had been passed in labor upon the farm, during which period the only mental discipline he received was such as could be obtained in the winter terms at the district school. Enthroned by circumstances which offered little to encourage his ambition; surrounded by obstacles which seemed almost insurmountable, his future prospects for a career beyond that of the most modest pretensions were any-thing but bright, but even at this time he determined, however much the effort might cost him, to rise above the conditions in which fate had placed him. He knew how hard the work would be, he knew the difficulties he must face and overcome, but a high purpose made him courageous and he was not dismayed. Solely dependent upon himself, with none to share the inspiration of his cherished...

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