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Location: St. Louis Missouri

Biographical Sketch of Samuel E. Hoffman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel E. Hoffman was born in Pennsylvania about 1835. He came to Kansas from Iowa, locating in Neosho Falls, Woodson County, in 1858, being the first lawyer in that section of the state. Mr. Hoffman was prominent in the early stages of statehood, being a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention of 1859 and of the first State Senate in 1861. He was also one of the agents appointed to select lands granted to the state by the general government in 1861-62. The later years of his life were spent in St. Louis, Missouri, where he was engaged in...

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Biography of David Ives Bushnell, Jr.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Born in 1875 in St. Louis, Missouri, David Ives Bushnell, Jr. was introduced to archaeological and ethnographic material at an early age. His father, David Bushnell, Sr., served on the Advisory Committee at the Missouri Historical Society for many years, was appointed the vice-president at one time, and was a trustee from 1898-1913. Never formally trained as an anthropologist, David I. Bushnell Jr. enjoyed a wide range of interests in the field of anthropology, archaeology and ethnography. Bushnell extensively photographed his numerous expeditions, many of which resulted in the publications he produced throughout his life. Schooled in St. Louis and later in Europe, Bushnell was never a student at Harvard University, but was associated with the University from 1901-1904 as an archaeological assistant at the Peabody Museum. He was later appointed as an editor at the Smithsonian Institution’s Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) where he remained from 1912-1921. His widespread interests and his reputation as a scholar and collector began in 1899 when Bushnell embarked on his first anthropological expedition to Northern Minnesota where he observed and recorded life among the Chippewa and Ojibwa as well as participated in an archaeological excavation at Mille Lac. In 1902, he studied saltmaking at Kimmswick in southern Missouri. In 1904, Bushnell excavated at the Cahokia Mounds. That same year,...

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Biography of John Baptist Miege

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and...

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Biographical Sketch of Gen. Carmi W. Babcock

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Gen. Carmi W. Babcock, president of the first free state council of 1857-58, a leading citizen of Lawrence and a prominent contractor in the building of several noted structures of the state, was born in Franklin County, Vermont, April 21, 1830. In 1850, after teaching for a time, he moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he read law and was admitted to the bar. He arrived at Lawrence in September, 1854, and finding that everything was too unsettled to make the practice of the law reliable he engaged in the real estate business. In 1857 he established a bank, only to see it swept away by the panic of that year. He received his appointment as the first postmaster of Lawrence February 1, 1855, but was removed in 1857 to make way for a pro slavery man. He was also the second mayor of Lawrence; a member of the Committee on Resolutions at the convention of National Democracy, which assembled in June, 1855, and a member of the executive committee of the Free State convention held at Grasshopper Falls August 26, 1857. In 1869 he was appointed surveyor general of Kansas, holding the office for two terms, or until its discontinuance. He was one of the builders of the great bridge across the Kaw at Lawrence,...

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Slave Narrative of Isaac Stier

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Edith Wyatt Moore Person Interviewed: Isaac Stier Location: Natchez, Mississippi Date of Birth: Jefferson County MS “Miss, my name is Isaac Stier, but folks calls me ‘Ike.’ I was named by my pappy’s young Marster an’ I aint never tol’ nobody all o’ dat name. It’s got twenty-two letters in it. It’s wrote but in de fam’ly Bible. Dat’s how I knows I’ll be one hund’ed years old if I lives ’til de turn o’ de year. I was born in Jefferson County ‘tween Hamburg an’ Union Church. De plantation joined de Whitney place an’ de Montgomery place, too. I b’longed to Marse Jeems Stowers. I don’t rightly ‘member how many acres my Marster owned, but ’twas a big plantation wid eighty or ninety head o’ grown folks workin’ it. No tellin’ how many little black folks dey was. “My mammy was Ellen Stier an’ my pappy was Jordon Stier. He was bought to dis country by a slave dealer from Nashville, Tennessee. Dey traveled all de way through de Injun Country on afoot. Dey come on dat Trace road. Twant nothin’ but a Injun Trail. “When dey got to Natchez de slaves was put in de pen ‘tached to de slave markets. It stood at de forks o’ St. Catherine Street an’ de Liberty...

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Slave Narrative of Berry Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: W. B. Allen Person Interviewed: Berry Smith Location: Forest, Mississippi Place of Birth: Sumpter County, Alabama “Uncle Berry” Smith is five feet two or three inches tall. He is scrupulously neat. He is very independent for his age, which is calculated at one hundred and sixteen years. He believes the figure to be correct. His mind is amazingly clear. “I was born an’ bred in Sumpter County, Alabama, in de prairie lan’, six miles from Gainesville. Dat’s where I hauled cotton. It was close to Livingston, Alabama, where we lived. “I was twelve years old when de stars fell. Dey fell late in de night an’ dey lighted up de whole earth. All de chaps was a-runnin’ ‘roun’ grabbin’ for ’em, but none of us ever kotched[FN: caught] one. It’s a wonder some of’ em didn’ hit us, but dey didn’. Dey never hit de groun’ atall. “When dey runned de Injuns out de country, me an’ another chap kotched one o’ dem Injun’s ponies an hung him up[FN: tied him up] in de grape vines. He said it was his pony an’ I said it was mine. “Marse Bob’s boy tol’ us his daddy was gwine a-whup us for stealin’ dat pony, so we hid out in de cane for two nights. Marse Bob...

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Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen...

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Slave Narrative of William Curtis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: William Curtis Location: McAlester, Oklahoma Age: 93 “Run Nigger, run, De Patteroll git ye! Run Nigger, run, He’s almost here!” Please Mr. Pateroll, Don’t ketch me! Jest take dat nigger What’s behind dat tree.” Lawsy, I done heard dat song all my life and it warn’t no joke wither. Do Patrol would git ye too if he caught ye off the plantation thout a pass from your Master, and he’d whey ye too. None of we doesn’t save without a pass. We chillen sung lots of songs and me played marbles, mumble pog, my town call. In de winter we would set around de fire and listen to our mammy and Pappy tell host tales and witch tales. I don’t guess dey was sho’ off so, but we all thought fey was. My Mammy was bought in Virginia by our Master, Hugh McKeown. He owned a big plantation in Georgia. Soon after she come to George A she married my pa. Old Master was good to us. We lived for a while in the quarters behind the Big House, and my marry was de house woman. Somehow, in a trade, or maybe my pa was mortgaged, but anyway ld Master let a man in Virginia have him and we never see him no more...

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Biographical Sketch of Emma G. Poole

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Ghigau and Sanders).-Emma Gazelle, daughter of William W. and Julia (Van Olhausen) Musick, born in St. Louis, Missouri, March 20, 1864, educated in that city and graduated from the Kndergarden Instruction School, taught in that branch in St. Louis and in Worcester Academy at Vinita, married January 11, 1388 in St. Louis Mission Charles Walton Poole, born in the Cherokee Nation, October 25, 1859, son of John and Sarah Myra (Harlan) Poole. He was the pioneer merchant of Chelsea, and postmaster of that place for nine years. He was a 32nd degree Mason and Shriner. He died May 14, 1910. Mrs. Poole is an Eeastern Star and White Shriner, a Methodist and belongs to the Dephian Club. Charles W. and Emma G. Poole were the parents of Charles Walton, born September 25, 1889; Carlisle A., born April 2s, 1894; Scott O., born October 2, 1889, enlisted in the Navy in 1917, was a yoeman on the Minnesota, and honorably discharged in January 1920; Gladys C., born August 29, 1901 member Senior class Chelsea High School 1921 . The parents of Emma G. Poole were natives of Virginia; her father was born September 2, 1862, and her mother, October 25,...

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Biography of Quitman U. Newell, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Quitman U. Newell, gynecologist and obstetrician, has followed the tendency of the age. toward specialization and in this branch of the profession has developed wide capability and power, bringing him to a prominent position in the ranks of the medical fraternity in St. Louis. He was born in Whistler, Mobile county, Alabama, June 14, 1886, and is a son of William H. and Minerva A. (Thompson) Newell. The father, a native of Louisiana, belonged to one of the old families of New York of Scotch-Irish descent. He became a pattern-maker by trade and had long followed that pursuit. His people removed from the Empire state to Alabama during the period of the Civil war and William H. Newell continued a resident of the south until his death, which occurred June 13, 1919, when he was sixty-nine years of age. His wife, a native of Mississippi, was of English lineage. She is living at the age of sixty-nine years, making her home in Whistler, Alabama. Dr. Newell, who was the seventh in order of birth in a family of four sons and five daughters, obtained a public school education in his native city and afterward entered Barton Academy at Mobile, while later he began preparation for his professional career as a student in the medical department...

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Biography of Edward C. Simmons

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edward C. Simmons had passed the eightieth milestone when he was called from his activities to the world beyond. His career had indeed been a most active and useful one. He was numbered among those men to whom St. Louis attributes her development and her greatness. He entered the commercial circles of the city when a lad of sixteen years as an apprentice to the hardware trade in the store of Child, Pratt & Company on Main street, near Vine. From that time until his death his course was marked by a steady progression that ultimately gave him world leadership in connection with the hardware business until he stood at the head of the largest enterprise of this character not only in America but in all the world. It has been said that opportunity never knocks at the door of one who is not ready to receive her. At every point in his career Edward C. Simmons was watchful of those chances which would permit him to take a forward step and he was never afraid to venture when the way was open. The story of his life is certainly an inspiring one. Born in Frederick, Maryland, on the 21st of September, 1839, he was but seven years of age when brought by his parents, Zachariah...

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Biography of Murray Carleton

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the year 1873 Murray Carleton entered the business circles of St. Louis in connection with the wholesale dry goods trade, but while he has steadily developed his interests and has won notable success in founding and conducting the Carleton Dry Goods Company, this represents but one phase of his activity, for at all times the subjective and objective interests of his life have been well balanced. He has ever recognized his duties and obligations to his fellowmen and has been a contributing factor to the promotion of many lines of work which have had for their object the betterment of conditions and the uplift of the individual. His life, broadly useful as well as substantially successful, should serve as an inspiration to the young and a source of encouragement to all. Mr. Carleton is a native of Cumberland, Maryland, and the son of a merchant and railway contractor, Henry D. Carleton, who resided in that city. From an early age the present St. Louis merchant has been dependent upon his own resources and made his initial step in business as an employee in a newspaper office in his native town when a lad of thirteen years. There he remained for a period of six years, gaining valuable experience in his newspaper training, for such a...

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Biography of Harvey S. McKay, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Thorough study in the leading medical centers of America and of Europe has well qualified Dr. Harvey S. McKay for successful practice and he has won particular prominence in the field of surgery, being identified as surgeon with several of the leading hospitals of St. Louis, while his private practice is extensive and important. Dr. McKay is numbered among Missouri’s native sons, his birth occurring in Troy, Lincoln county, October 1, 1878. His father, Dr. Solomon R. McKay, also a native of Missouri, is of Scotch descent. He is well known as a physician and surgeon, having long practiced following his graduation from the St. Louis Medical College in 1876. In politics he is a republican and for sixteen years was postmaster of Troy, Missouri, being very prominent as a party worker and at all times loyal to every cause or interest which he espouses. The same spirit of unfaltering devotion to the interests of the country was manifest by his father, Dr. Samuel H. McKay, who served with the Union army during the Civil war and who as a physician and surgeon became widely known as a representative and valued member of the profession. The mother of Dr. Harvey S. McKay was in her maindenhood Julia Alexandre, a native of Missouri and of French and...

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Biography of William C. Steigers

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William C. Steigers, who has passed the seventy-fiftb milestone on life’s journey, has through an extended period been closely identified not only with the business development but with the civic progress of St. Louis and has the distinction of being the oldest living past exalted ruler of St. Louis Lodge, No. 9, B. P. O. E., his identification therewith dating from 1882. St. Louis numbers him among her native sons, his birth having here occurred September 15, 1845, on Market street between Third and Fourth streets and the house is still standing, his parents being Francis I. and Sarah (Price) Steigers. The father was engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business and spending his youthful days under the parental roof William C. Steigers attended the Wyman school and afterward the Christian Brothers College, the, Laclede and Washington schools and other educational institutions of St. Louis, until September, 1862, when he enlisted in the Eighth Missouri Regiment at the age of seventeen years, or one year before the youth of the country is regarded as of military age. The south was conscripting, the north drafting and every volunteer, regardless of age, was welcomed as a hero if he could carry a gun. The war was being fiercely waged and the air was surcharged with patriotic excitement....

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Biography of Newton W. Amos, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Newton W. Amos, a physician of St. Louis, was born at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, January 26, 1867. His father, Adam Amos, was a native of Alsace Lorraine and came to America in 1856, making his way direct to Cape Girardeau county, Missouri, where he built the first blacksmith shop of the place. There he resided until 1871 when he removed to Smithville, Bollinger county, and in 1873 he removed to Poplar Bluff, Missouri, where afterward he established his home in Allenville, Cape Girardeau county, Missouri, his death there occurring in 1875. During the Civil war he was a member of the Cape Girardeau Home Guard. He married Anna Litzelfelner, a native of Austria, who came to America with her parents at the age of six years, the family settling in Cape Girardeau county, where Mrs. Amos was reared and educated. By her marriage she became the mother of three sons, of whom the youngest, Benjamin, is now deceased, while Robert, the eldest, is a resident of Allenville. Dr. Amos, the second in order of birth, was educated in the district schools of Cape Girardeau county before attending the Southeast Normal at Cape Girardeau, after which he won a teacher’s certificate and entered upon educational work. He taught in Cape Girardeau county for seven terms, but...

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