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Location: St. Louis Missouri

In Possession Of The “Promised Land”

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Monday, Nov. 22, 1819.–This day breakfasted with Mr. R. Morrison and dined with Mr. W. Morrison. These gentlemen are wealthy and live in very comfortable style. Mrs. R. Morrison is one of the most intelligent women that I have conversed with, and possesses a lady’s privilege, while Mrs. W. Morrison might rank, in point of beauty with some of the belles of Philadelphia. Dr. Hill having accomplished his business, we set out from Kaskia at 2 o’clock, after bidding a friendly farewell to many new friends made in this place. I must confess I found a few possessing so much more merit than I anticipated that I parted with them reluctantly. Traveled twelve miles, and arrived at Mme. LeCount’s. We supped with a tableful of French. Not one of them could speak English. Pumpkins, spoiled venison and rancid, oily butter for supper, added to the odor of a few ‘coons and opossums that were ripening in the sun, induced us to cut our comfort short. During the night I was taken ill with rheumatism. Bled myself largely. Set out at 6 o’clock in the morning rather better, though dull. Passed some small lakes full of ducks and geese. Saw seven deer, some wild turkeys and other game. Retraced our former steps. Passed Cahokia, a small and...

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Biography of Rev. Samuel Parker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now REV. SAMUEL PARKER. – Mr. Parker was not a pioneer to settle in this country, nor to engage in missionary work, but was a pioneer of pioneers, a “John The Baptist,” to prepare the way for missionaries and emigrants. He was born at Ashfield, Massachusetts, April 23, 1779, and was the son of Elisha and Thankful M. Parker. In 1806 he graduated from Williams College, and from Andover Theological Seminary in the first class that left that institution. He immediately went west to New York, and engaged in home missionary work. He was ordained as a Congregational minister at Danby, New York, November 12, 1812, and was married first to Miss H. Sears shortly afterwards. But she soon died; and in 1815 he was married to Miss Jerusha Lord, who was the mother of his three children, – Mrs. J. Van Kirk and Doctor S.J. Parker of Ithaca, New York, and Professor H.W. Parker of Grinnell College, Iowa. He labored most of the time at Danby, Ithaca and Apulia, New York, and Middlefield, Massachusetts until 1833. At that time the request of the four Nez Perces who went to St. Louis in search of the white man’s bible was made public; and on April 10, 1833, he offered himself to the American Board of Commissioners for...

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Biography of Hon. Peter Paquet

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HON. PETER PAQUET – This pioneer of 1852, who is the son of F.X. Paquet and Marie Louise Lannadier de Langdeau, was born in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, on the 13th of January, 1839. He received an education in the private and public schools of St. Louis. In the spring of 1852 he left the city of St. Louis with his parents, who had determined to emigrate to Oregon, the family then consisting of father, mother and six children. They came up the Missouri river on the old steamer Timour No. 2, and in eight days reached the town of St. Joseph, where they completed the outfit. Sometime in the month of May, with their ox-teams and wagons laden with the provisions for the trip, they took their lives and fortunes in their hands, and started to cross the great American desert, known as the plains. They pursued their journey without particular incident or accident, barring the usual sickness and privations which were the lot of most of the emigrants of that year, until they reached the crossing of Snake river. Here some rascally traders had established themselves for the purpose of swindling the tired emigrant, and buying the running gear of his wagons, after persuading him that he could get into a boat,...

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Biographical Sketch of George H. Moser

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George H. Moser, a well known and successful homeopathic physician of Arcola, was born in Auburn, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1859, and is the son of John Moser, a native of the same state. His mother was Alvinia Hellig, who was a descendant of Quaker ancestry. The Moser family are descendants of the Dutch, whose lineage is traced back by some of the members to Daniel Moser, who made his settlement in Pennsylvania in the year 1799. Doctor Moser came west and early in life turned his attention to the study of medicine. After a thorough preparation he entered the Homeopathic Medical College of Missouri, at St. Louis, which is one of the leading medical institutions of the west, and was graduated with distinguished honors in the class of 1889-90. He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Belleville, Illinois, where he remained in active practice for two years. Then he removed to Bond County, where he was located until 1895, when, on the 12th of October, in the same year, he came to Arcola. He came here with a fixed purpose of making Arcola and vicinity his field of work, and time has proven that he has made no mistake in his location. He almost immediately got into a paying practice, and...

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Biographical Sketch of John McGhee

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John McGhee, a native of Ireland, married Margaret Adams, who was born in England. They settled in Shelby County, Ky., where they had Lynch, Emily, Margaret, James, Washington, Nancy, and Rice. Lynch was a physician. Re-married Margaret Shackelford, and settled in Louisville, Ky., but removed to St. Louis, Mo., in 1838. Washington married Julia Sibley, of Kentucky, and died in 1828, leaving a widow and four children Mary H., Robert L., Harriet, and Epsey. Mrs. MeGhee and her children settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1841, and she is still living, in her 76th...

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Biographical Sketch of William S. Slavens

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William S. Slavens was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., September 15, 1887. He was married five times; first to Anna Hawkins, by whom he had three children, second to Mary Riggs, third to Elizabeth Elsbury, by whom he had seven children, fourth to the widow Thomas, whose maiden name was Rebecca Stanley, by whom he had two children; and fifth to the widow Meyers, whose maiden name was Paulina Hunt. Mr. Slavens settled in Montgomery, on Brush Creek, in 1820, and removed to near Middletown in 1829. He owned part of the land that Middletown was built upon. Mr. Slavens came to Missouri in company with his brother Thomas and a Mr. McCarta, in a little horse cart. Their stock consisted of one cow, the property of William Slavens, which they drove before them and for which he was offered forty acres of land within the present limits of St. Louis; but thought his cow was worth more than the land, and kept her. Mr. Slavens had $640 in money, which he loaned to Mr. McCarter, who invested it in Irish potatoes, and planted them on ten acres of land in Illinois. The potato crop was a failure, and the money was never repaid. The names of Mr. Slavens’ children were James H., Sarah, Isabella, Lydia...

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Biography of John Davis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell...

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Biographical Sketch of Simon Diggs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Simon Diggs, of Lancaster County, Virginia, had a son named William, who married a Miss Goe, of Middlesex County, Virginia, by whom he had one son, named Christopher. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Mary Seeton, by whom he had William, Isaac, Simon, John H., Dudley, Rowland, Barbee., Cole, Nancy, Polly, and Elizabeth. John H. married Sarah Hathaway, who lived to the age of 103 years. Their children were Lawson, Christopher Y., John H., Jr., Cynthia, Malinda, Nancy, Elizabeth, and William C. Lawson and John H., Jr., were ship carpenters. The former married Sarah Diggs, of Virginia, and settled in Missouri in 1834. John H., Jr., followed the sea for a number of years, but finally abandoned that dangerous calling and emigrated to the West. He came to St. Louis in 1834, and worked on the first steamboat built in that city. In 1339 he settled in Montgomery County, where he still lives. He married Jane Jeter, a daughter of Pleasant Jeter, of Richmond, Virginia, and sister of the eminent Rev. Dr. Jeter of that...

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Biographical Sketch of George Godfrey

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George Godfrey lived at Ritford, England. His son Peter married Dorothea Learey, of England, by whom he had Thomas, John, Edward, George, Charles, and Mary. Thomas came to America and settled in Canada. John went to California, and died on his return to England. Edward lives in Mercer County, Pa. George married Mary Ostick, of England, and settled in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1830, in St. Louis in 1836, and in Montgomery County, where Jonesburg now stands, in 1838. His children are Mary A., George, Edward, William O., John W., Henry M., and James A. Mary A. married Rev. George Smith, a Methodist minister, who came to Montgomery County in 1836. Mr. Godfrey has been a devoted Methodist for many years, and a leading member of his church. His brother Charles settled in Louisville, Kentucky, and his son, Charles, Jr., lives in Fulton,...

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Biography of Adam Hance

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Adam Hance was born in Coblin, a French province of Alsace, and, as usual with the people of that country, spoke both German and English. He came to America and settled near Germantown, Pa., in 1722, where he married a German lady, and raised a large family. His younger son, also named Adam, married a Miss Stoebuck, of Pennsylvania, in 1768, and settled in Montgomery County, Va. When the revolutionary war began, fired by the prevailing patriotic feelings of the day, he joined the American army under Washington, and served during the entire war. He was in the battles of Brandywine, Yorktown, and several others, and experienced a great deal of very hard service. He had six children, viz. Henry, Peter, Martha A., Priscilla, William, and John. Henry was Sheriff of his native County for a number of years, and afterward became a successful merchant in Newburn, N. C. Peter was married first to Elizabeth Harper, of Virginia, by whom he had Mary, Anna, Margaret, Sabrina, William, and James. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs. Juliet Hewett, whose first husband was drowned in Kentucky about 1815. By her he had Robert, Elizabeth, Harvey, and Juliet. Mr. Hance settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1829, on what is now the Devault place. (Children...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Allen D. Holloway

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Rogers)-Eva, daughter of Artemus Andrews and Mary A. (Rogers) Barker, born near Kinnison, June 20, 1886. Educated in Female Seminary, St. Teresa Academy, Kansas City and Forest Park University, St. Louis, Missouri. Married at Vinita May 10, 1906 Allen D. Holloway, son of William and Cordelia Holloway, born 1879 in Cass County, Mo. They are the parents of: Mary Dee, born May 1, 1910 and William Andrew Holloway, born July 11, 1917. Mrs. Holloway is a member of the Methodist Church and the Eastern Star Chapter. Mr. Holloway is the cashier of the Oklahoma State Bank at Welch,...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Joseph F. Mayes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Adair McNair and Downing)—Dr. Joseph F. Mayes, born December 21, 1877, educated at Male Seminary, Central College, Fayette, Missouri and the Medical Department of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. He graduated from the two latter institutions. He located in St. Louis in his profession and rapidly built up a large practice. He married there on June 14, 1909 Miss Esmeralda Berry born November 4, 1887. They are the parents of Esmeralda Mary, born January 21, 1913 and Samuel Houston Mayes, born August 11, 1917. Dr. Mayes is a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner. John Adair, a Scotchman married Gahoga, a full blood Cherokee of the Deer Clan. They were the parents of: Walter Adair, called “Black Watt” born December 11, 1783, married May 15, 1804 Rachel Thompson born December 24, 1786. He died January 20, 1835 and she died April 22, 1876. They were the parents of: Nancy Adair, born October 7, 1808, married January 22, 1824 Samuel Mayes born April 11, 1803, in Tennessee. He died December 30, 1858 and she died March 18, 1876. They were the parents of: George Washington, John Thompson, Frank A., James Allen, Joel Bryan, Rachel, William Henry, Samuel Houston, and Wiley B. Mayes. John Thompson Mayes was a Captain in the Confederate service. Joel Bryan and Samuel...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert F. McFarland

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Albert F. McFarland was born in Platte county, Missouri, near Weston, August 5, 1838, and resided there until he was twenty-three years old, receiving his education in the common schools and at Pleasant Ridge College, of that county. He pursued a course of medical studies at St. Louis, Missouri, during the years 1860, ’61, ’62 and ’63, and began practice in the general army hospital in 1863, where he continued to practice until the close of the war, in 1865. In 1866 he made a trip across the plains to Salt Lake City, Utah, and to Virginia City, Montana, returning in the fall of that year. In December, 1867, he settled in Daviess county and commenced the practice of medicine. On the 19th day of November, 1868, Dr. McFarland was united in marriage to Miss Fannie, daughter of Theodore Peniston. He practiced his profession in the eastern part of Daviess county until November, 1874, when he was elected, on the Democratic ticket, clerk of the Circuit Court; was re-elected in 1878 to the same office, which he now holds and most credibly fills and performs the duties which devolve upon him to the satisfaction of the court and...

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Genealogy of William Russell Allen Family

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Y157 WILLIAM RUSSELL ALLEN: now living in St. Louis; m. Florence York in 1905. They had the following ch.: (1) Francis York, b. 1906. (2) Wm. Russell, III, b. 1909. (3) Florence Mary, b. 1918. (4) Ann Russell, b....

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Biography of Col. Lewis R. Jewell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Various members of the Jewell family have been well known at Fort Scott and vicinity for many years. Both Col. Lewis R. and his son, by the same name, were active, and the father quite prominent, in the days of the Civil war. He came of old Massachusetts lineage, moved to Ohio early in life, and while a resident of Washington County married Susan Hutchinson. Mr. Jewell became interested in river transportation, and when he moved to St. Louis, several years before the war, was the owner of several boats plying the Mississippi and Ohio, and had reached the rank of “Captain.” In 1859 Captain Jewell located in the central strip of Kansas near Arcadia, and there established himself as a farmer and stock-raiser. By the vigorous resistance of settlers, in which he was a leader, the aggressive Cherokecs were barred from the country, but to make their tenure more secure a delegation of the whites was sent to Washington to seek Government backing and to protect the settlement of a large contemplated colony from the East. The captain was one of this delegation, but before anything definite was accomplished the Civil war broke like a sudden storm on the country, and colonization and all else were thrust aside in face of the great danger and...

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