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Location: St. Louis Missouri

Prominent White Men among the Chickasaws

At an early day a few white men of culture and of good morals, fascinated with the wild and romantic freedom and simplicity of the Chickasaw life, cast their lot among that brave and patriotic nation of people. I read an article published in Mississippi a few years ago, which stated that a man by the name of McIntosh, commissioned by British authorities to visit the Chickasaw Nation and endeavor to keep up its ancient hostility to the French, was so delighted with the customs and manners of that brave, free and hospitable people that, after the accomplishment of his mission,...

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Kit Carson, His Life and Adventures – Indian Wars

The subject of this sketch, Christopher “Kit” Carson, was born on the 24th of December, 1809, in Madison County, Kentucky. The following year his parents removed to Howard County, Missouri, then a vast prairie tract and still further away from the old settlements. The new home was in the midst of a region filled with game, and inhabited by several predatory and hostile tribes of Indians, who regarded the whites as only to be respected for the value of their scalps. The elder Carson at once endeavored to provide for the safety of his family, as far as possible,...

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The Wars of the Five Nations – Indian Wars

Although the confederacy known as the Five Nations were the allies of the English in the war against the French, and joined them in many of their principal expeditions, their history deserves a separate notice, as they afford us a complete example of what the Indians of North America were capable of. Their great reputation as warriors, and their wisdom in council, have been so often alluded to by those interested in the history of the Indians, that we shall be pardoned for giving a somewhat extended description of their confederacy, and an account of their wars. The Five...

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Nellie Hazeltine, Mrs. Frederick W. Paramore

Among the members of the graduating class at Mary Institute, St. Louis, in the year 1873, was a young girl who, in addition to the bright mind and intellectual ambition she had already manifested, was endowed with so extraordinary a physical beauty and so lovable a character that much of the brilliancy of her life might even then have been foretold. She was not yet seventeen years old, and was as absolutely unconscious of the unusual loveliness of her person as she ever seemed to be even after ten years of adulation. Her figure had already attained a faultless...

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Jessie Benton, Mrs. John C. Fremont

In the year 1868 the city of St. Louis erected a monument to the memory of one of her most distinguished citizens, Thomas Hart Benton. Of the forty thousand people who thronged the park on that May afternoon set aside for its unveiling, but one was of the great man’s blood, the daughter most closely associated with the accomplishment of his loftiest conception, that dream of Western empire for his country. Accompanied by her husband, General John C. Fremont, she had accepted the invitation to unveil the statue. As she pulled the cord that loosened its wrap-pings, and the school children of the city threw their offerings of roses at the feet of him who had befriended their fathers, the huzzas of the vast multitude filled the fragrant air. The outgoing train to San Francisco halted to salute with flags and whistles as the bronze hand, pointing to the west, came into view and the words graven on the pedestal: “There is the East. There lies the road to India.”To General Fremont, quietly and reverently occupying a place of honor on the platform, it was one of those supreme moments when the landmarks of memory, those events that give color to our lives, stand forth to the exclusion even of that which is at the moment passing before the eye. Neither the vivas of the people nor the flowers...

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Treaty of July 19, 1820

A treaty made and concluded by, and between, Auguste Chouteau and Benjamin Stephenson, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors, of the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Nation, of the other part, the same being supplementary to, and amendatory of, the Treaty made and concluded at Edwardsville, on the 30th July, 1819, between the United States and the said Kickapoo nation. Article I. It is agreed, between the United States and the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, that the sixth article of the treaty, to which this is supplementary, shall be, and the same is hereby, altered and amended, so as to read as follows, viz: In consideration of, and exchange for, the cession made by the aforesaid tribe, in the first article of this treaty, the United States, in addition to three thousand dollars worth of merchandise, this day paid to the said tribe, hereby cede to the said tribe, to be by them possessed in like manner as the lands, ceded by the first article of this treaty by them to the United States, were possessed, a certain tract of land in the territory of Missouri, and included within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the confluence of the rivers Pommes de...

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Treaty of March 30, 1817

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis by and between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, deputed by the Menomenee tribe or nation of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Menomenee tribe or nation. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, do, by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession of land heretofore made by their tribe or nation to the British, French, or Spanish, government, within the limits of the United States, or their territories; and also, all...

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Treaty of June 2, 1825

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs, Head-Men, and Warriors, of the Great and Little Osage Tribes of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by their respective Tribes or Nations. In order more effectually to extend to said Tribes that protection of the Government so much desired by them, it is agreed as follows: Article I. The Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations do, hereby, cede and relinquish to the United States, all their right, title, interest, and claim, to lands lying within the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, and to all lands lying West of the said State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, North and West of the Red River, South of the Kansas River, and East of a line to be drawn from the head sources of the Kansas, Southwardly through the Rock Saline, with such reservations, for such considerations, and upon such terms as are hereinafter specified, expressed, and provided for. Article II. Within the limits of the country, above ceded and relinquished, there shall be reserved, to, and for, the Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations, aforesaid, so long as they may choose to occupy the same, the following described tract of land: beginning...

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Treaty of June 22, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Marhar tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of the said tribe, who shall, at any...

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Treaty of June 20, 1818

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Republic, on the part and behalf of their tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned, chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each and every individual of the said tribe who shall, at any time hereafter,...

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Treaty of August 24, 1818

A treaty of friendship, cession, and limits, made and entered into, this twenty-fourth day of August, eighteen hundred and eighteen, by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Quapaw tribe or nation, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. Article I. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other state, power, or sovereignty, whatsoever. Article II. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby, for, and in consideration of, the promises and stipulations hereinafter named, cede and relinquish to the United States, forever, all the lands within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the mouth of the Arkansaw river; thence extending up the Arkansaw, to the Canadian fork, and up the Canadian fork to its source; thence south, to Big Red river, and down the middle of that river, to the Big Raft; thence, a direct line, so as to strike the Mississippi river, thirty leagues in a straight line, below the mouth of Arkansaw; together with all their claims to land east of the Mississippi, and north of the...

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Treaty of June 1, 1816

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, representing eight bands of the Siouxs, composing the three tribes called the Siouxs of the Leaf, the Siouxs of the Broad Leaf, and the Siouxs who shoot in the Pine Tops, on the part and behalf of their said tribes, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribes, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States, and all the individuals composing the aforesaid tribes; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their tribes respectively, do,...

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Biographical Sketch of George Washington Schaffer

The subject of this sketch, George Washington Schaffer, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, July 4, 1847. His parents removed, during his boyhood, to Galesburg, Illinois, where they resided several years. Returning to St. Louis, Mr. Schaffer engaged in the butcher business, and continued there until the fall of 1868. His next field of operation was Kansas City, where he followed his trade for some time. From Kansas City he went to St. Joseph, where he remained until 1874, and then returned to St. Louis. He lived in St. Louis one year, during which time he had a rib broken while separating some unruly cattle. The butchers association, to which he belonged, then sent him out with Cole’s Lightning-rod Company, and he traveled with them in Kansas. After another trial of the butcher’s business in Kansas City, he went to Chicago in the fall of 1875 and remained there one year in the employ of Fowler Brothers. From Chicago he proceeded to Atchison, Kansas, and thence again to St. Joseph. On first coming to Daviess county, he stopped in Gallatin, but moved out to Jamesport in the spring of 1880, and again began butchering beef for the hungry. He is one of the firm in the meat-market business of Dinsmore & Schaffer, and is also senior member of the firm of Schafer & Parks, confectioners and restaurateurs. He is a...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel T. Howell M.D.

Samuel T. Howell is a native of Gentry county, Missouri, born February 22, 1843. His father, James M. Howell, was a native of Virginia, and his, mother, Rachel R. Howell, was born in Kentucky. Our subject was reared upon a farm and was educated in the common schools, supplemented by a few terms at the Camden Point College, of Camden Point, Platte county, Missouri. At the age of twenty-four he began, the study of medicine at Albany, Missouri, with Dr. G. W. Stapleton, and in 1866, entered the Missouri, or McDowell, Medical College, of St. Louis, and graduated at the Jefferson College, of Philadelphia, in 1871, and also graduated with distinction and honor in the department of surgery under a separate faculty, having made that a special study. He began the practice or his profession within three miles where he was born. In 1874 he removed to this county and has been engaged in an active practice ever since, giving special attention to surgery. Dr. Howell is a cousin to the Hon. John C. Howell, present judge of the Seventeenth Judicial Circuit. Dr. Howell was married, January 18, 1869, to Miss Julia A. Evans, of Andrew county, Missouri. She was born July 22, 1845. They have four children; namely, Jessie M., born March 7, 1870; William H., born December 23, 1873; Emmet O., born July 10, 1877; and Samuel...

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Escape From The Robber Band

Monday, Nov. 8, 1819.–The disappointment experienced from the unmanly conduct of Dr. Hill had a happy effect on our little company. It bound us more firmly and nearer together, and, I may add with truth, almost fitted us for the field of battle. The hour of 9 o’clock had now arrived, the night uncommonly dark and cloudy. On our going into the house one of the strangers went into the yard and gave the Indian warwhoop three times very loud. About 10 o’clock they took their six rifles, went into the yard with a candle and shot them off one by one, snuffing the candle at forty yards every shot. They then loaded afresh, primed and picked their flints. A large horn was then taken from the loft and blown distinctly three times very loud. All those signals (which we had been told of) brought no more of the company. They then dispatched two of their own party, who were gone until 12 o’clock. They stated to their comrades “they could not be had.” It may be readily imagined, after what we had overhead, seeing such preparations and observing many of their private signals, being warned of our danger previous to stopping at the house, together with the recent and cruel murders which had been committed, in a strange country, where every man made and executed his own law...

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