Location: St. Johns County FL

Memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom

I will here present to the reader the memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom the oldest of the three brothers who cast their lot in their morning” of life among” the Choctaws, and became the fathers of the Folsom House in the Choctaw Nation, as related by himself to the missionary, Rev. Cyrus Byington, June, 1823, and furnished me by his grand-daughter Czarena Folsom, now Mrs. Rabb. “I was born in North Carolina, Rowan County, May 17th, 1756. My father was born in Massachusetts or Connecticut. My mother was born in New Jersey. My parents moved to Georgia, and there my father sent me to school about six months, during which time I learned to read and write. My mother taught me to read and spell at home. My father had a great desire to go to Mississippi to get money; they said money grew on bushes! We got off and came into the Choctaw Nation. The whole family came; we hired an Indian pilot who led us through the Nation to Pearl River, where we met three of our neighbors who were re turning on account of sickness. This alarmed my father, who then determined to return to North Carolina. We came back into the Nation to Mr. Welch’s, on Bok Tuklo (Two Creeks), the father of Mr. Nail. At this time I was about 19 years of age. At...

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty...

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Indian Wars of Carolina – Previous to the Revolution

When the English settled in South Carolina, it was found that the State was inhabited by about twenty different tribes of Indians. The whites made gradual encroachments without meeting with any opposition from the Indians, until the latter saw that if these advances were continued, they would be completely driven from their country. A struggle was immediately begun, in which the colonists suffered so much from the number and fury of their enemies that a price was fixed upon every Indian who should be brought captive to Charleston, from whence they were sold into slavery for the West Indies....

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Slave Narrative of Dave Taylor

Interviewer: Jules A. Frost Person Interviewed: Dave Taylor Location: Tampa, Florida A Marine In Ebony From a Virginia plantation to Florida, through perils of Indian war-fare; shanghaied on a Government vessel and carried ’round the world; shipwrecked and dropped into the lap of romance – these are only a few of the colorful pages from the unwritten diary of old Uncle Dave, ex-slave and soldier of fortune. The reporter found the old man sitting on the porch of his Iber City shack, thoughtfully chewing tobacco and fingering his home-made cane. At first he answered in grumpy monosyllables, but by the magic of a good cigar, he gradually let himself go, disclosing minute details of a most remarkable series of adventures. His language is a queer mixture of geechy, sea terms and broad “a’s” acquired by long association with Nassau “conchs.” Married to one of these ample-waisted Bahama women, the erst-while rambler and adventurer proved that rolling stones sometimes become suitable foundations for homes – he lived faithfully with the same wife for fifty-one years. “Shippin’ ‘fore de mahst ain’t no job to make a preacher f’m a youngster; hit’s plenty tough; but I ain’t nevah been sorry I went to sea; effen a boy gwine take to likker an’ wimmen, he kin git plenty o’both at home, same as in for’n ports.” The old man bit off a conservative...

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Slave Narrative of Edward Lycurgas

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Edward Lycurgas Location: Jacksonville, Florida “Pap tell us ‘nother story ’bout do war and ’bout de fust time you saw mamma.” It has been almost 60 years since a group of children gathered about their father’s knee, clamoring for another story. They listened round-eyed to stories they already knew because “pap” had told them so many times before. These narratives along with the great changes he has seen, were carefully recorded in the mind of Edward, the only one of this group now alive. “Pap” was always ready to oblige with the story they never tired of. He could always be depended upon to begin at the beginning, for he loved to tell it. “It all begun with our ship being took off the coast of Newport News, Virginia. We wuz runnin’ the bl0ckade – sellin’ guns and what-not to them Northerners. We aint had nothin’ to do wid de war, unnerstand, we English folks was at’ter de money. Whose War? The North and South’s, of course. I hear my captain say many a time as how they was playin’ ball wid the poor niggers. One side says ‘You can’t keep your niggers lessen you pay em and treat em like other folks.’ Mind you dat wasn’t de rale reason, they was mad at de South but it was one of de ways dey...

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Slave Narrative of Christine Mitchell

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Christine Mitchell Location: Saint Augustine, Florida Age: 84 Occupation: Field Worker An interesting description of the slave days just prior to the War Between the States is given by Christine Mitchell, of Saint Augustine. Christine was born in slavery at Saint Augustine, remaining on the plantation until she was about 10 years old. During her slave days she knew many of the slaves on plantations in the Saint Augustine vicinity. Several of these plantations, she says, were very large, and some of them had as many as 100 slaves. The ex-slave, who is now 84 years old, recalls that at least three of the plantations in the vicinity were owned or operated by Minorcans. She says that the Minorcans were popularly referred to in the section as “Turnbull’s Darkies,” a name they apparently resented. This caused many of them, she claims, to drop or change their names to Spanish or American surnames. Christine moved to Fernandina a few years after her freedom, and there lived near the southern tip of Amelia Island, where Negro ex-slaves lived in a small settlement all their own. This settlement still exists, although many of its former residents are either dead or have moved away. Christine describes the little Amelia Island community as practically self-sustaining, its residents raising their own food, meats, and other commodities. Fishing was a favorite...

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Macapiras Indians

Macapiras Tribe, or Amacapiras Tribe. Meaning unknown. A small tribe which was brought to the St. Augustine missions in 1726 along with some Pohoy, and so apparently from the southwest coast. There were only 24, part of whom died and the rest returned to their old homes before...

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Fresh Water Indians

Fresh Water Tribe (“Agna Dulce”) Indians. A name applied to the people of seven to nine neighboring towns, and for which there is no native equivalent. Fresh Water Connections. The same as Acuera (q. v.). Fresh Water Location. In the coast district of eastern Florida between St. Augustine and Cape Canaveral. Fresh Water Villages The following towns are given in this province extending from north to south, but not all of the native names have been preserved: Anacape, said to have been 20 leagues south of St. Augustine. Antonico, another possible name is Tunsa. Equale, location uncertain. Filache, location uncertain. Maiaca, a few leagues north of Cape Canaveral and on St. Johns River. Moloa, south of the mouth of St. Johns River (omitted from later lists). San Julian, location uncertain. San Sebastian, on an arm of the sea near St. Augustine, destroyed in 1600 by a flood. Tocoy, given by one writer as 5 leagues from St. Augustine; by another as 24 leagues. The names Macaya and Maycoya, which appear in the neighborhood of the last of these are probably synonyms or corruptions of Maiaca, but there seems to have been a sister town of Maiaca at an early date which Fontaneda (1854) calls Mayajuaca or Mayjuaca. In addition to the preceding, a number of town names have been preserved which perhaps belong to places in this province. Some...

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Hamilton, Ralph – Obituary

Tuesday morning the body of Ralph Hamilton arrived from a Florida Camp, he too, dieing from pneumonia following an attack of Spanish Influenza. Ralph left in June with a quota of Wallowa County boys for Benson Polytechnic School, Portland, for special training for the army. He was stationed in the Remount Depot near Jacksonville, Florida. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday from the Methodist church. The funeral services were conducted by the Knights of Pythias and the members of the state militia from Enterprise. Our boys are going one by one and we realize the prices of war all the more as our own are taken. Four Wallowa boys have now died in the service. Ralph was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hamilton of Wallowa. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hamilton went to La Grande Monday to meet the body of their son Ralph. Wallowa County Reporter, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday October 24,...

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Straight, David Duane – Obituary

Union, Oregon David Duane Straight, 63, of Jacksonville, Fla., and formerly of Union and La Grande, died Nov. 3 in Jacksonville. Following cremation, his ashes will be returned to Alaska in the spring. Mr. Straight was born April 21, 1943, to H. David and Dorothy Anne Straight. He was raised in Union and lived in La Grande while attending college. He graduated from Southwestern Oregon Community College with two degrees in 1969 and married Joyce Marie Emmons in Kodiak, Alaska, on April 8, 1972. He lived and worked in Alaska for 35 years before retiring to Portland. He later moved to Jacksonville for care at the Mayo Cancer Center and to be near his daughter. He served in the Navy as a submarine sonarman and received a bronze medal for service as a civilian during Desert Storm. Survivors include his wife, formerly of Alaska and now residing in Florida, and daughter, Dawn Marie Straight of Rockledge, Fla.; his mother and sister, Deannie Myers, both of La Grande; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father and a son, Dean Albert Straight. The Observer, Obituaries for the week ending Nov. 18, 2006, Published: November 18,...

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Kaemming, Carson, Jr. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Carson Kaemming Jr., 18, of Cheney, Wash., died Oct. 22, 2004, from injuries received in an automobile accident at Cheney. His funeral was today at Cheney Funeral Chapel in Cheney. Burial will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Carson was born on March 30, 1986, at St. Augustine, Fla. He moved to Cheney, Wash., with his family in 1987 and lived at Cheney and Ritzville where he attended school and worked at Zips restaurant in both communities. Survivors include his father, Carson Kaemming Sr. of Spokane,Wash.; his mother, Sharon Kaemming of Four Lakes, Wash.; his stepfather, Dennis McBride of Four Lakes, Wash.; brothers, Christopher Kaemming of Cheney, Wash., and Sean Kaemming of Four Lakes, Wash.; grandparents, Annette Craner and Greg Swaim of Newberg and Diane and Luther Kaemming of Maysville, N.C.; great-grandparents, Roland and Millie George of Baker City, Otha Robertson of St. Petersburg, Fla., and great-uncle and great-aunt, Ray and Linda Jones of Hermiston. Memorial contributions may be made to the Wishing Star Foundation. Cheney Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, October 29, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Timucua Tribe

Timucua Tribe, Timucua Indians. The principal of the Timucuan tribes of Florida. The name is written Timucua or Timuqua by the Spaniards; Thimagoa by the French; Atimaco, Tomoco, etc., by the English. They seem to be identical with the people called Nukfalalgi or Nukfila by the Creeks, described by the latter as having once occupied the upper portion of the peninsula and as having been conquered, together with the Apalachee, Yamasee, and Calusa, by the Creeks. When first known to the French and Spanish, about 1565, the Timucua occupied the territory along middle St John River and about the present St Augustine. Their chief was known to the French as Olata Ouae Utina, abbreviated to Utina or Outina, which, however, is a title rather than a personal name, data (hoiceta) signifying ‘chief,’ and utina ‘country.’ His residence town on St John River is believed to have been not far below Lake George. He ruled a number of subchiefs or towns, among which are mentioned (Laudonnière) Acuera, Anacharaqua, Cadecha, Calany, Chilili, Eclaou, Enacappe, Mocoso, and Omitiaqua. Of these Acuera is evidently the coast town south of Cape Canaveral, where the Spaniards afterward established the mission of Santa Lucia de Acuera. The names Acuera, Mocoso, and Utina(ma) are duplicated in the west part of the peninsula in the De Soto narratives. The Timucua were Christianized by Spanish Franciscans toward the close...

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St. Johns County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. St. Johns County Cemetery Records Hosted at St. Johns County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Barnes Cemetery Hugenot Cemetery Julington Creek Cemetery Our Lady of Good Council Cemetery Old Spanish Cemetery St. Johns County Cemetery Records Hosted at St. Johns County Florida FLGenWeb Huguenot Cemetery Old Spanish Cemetery Our Lady of Good Counsel Church Cemetery St. Augustine National Cemetery, Partial...

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Biography of James Lotan

James Lotan was born in Paterson, New Jersey in 1843, and is of Irish descent, his father John Lotan, having been born in Ireland and emigrated to America in 1840. Until his twelfth year young Lotan attended the public schools of his native city. He then became an apprentice to the machinist trade in his uncle’s shop. After acquiring a full knowledge of his trade he went to Jacksonville, Florida, where with an elder brother he was employed until the war of the Rebellion began, when he returned home, and a few months thereafter, in May 1861, enlisted for two years in Company C, Ninth New York Volunteer Regiment, commanded by Col. Rush C. Hawkins. This regiment was first stationed at Fort Monroe and from there proceeded to Newport News, where it took part in a fight at Great Bethel, which resulted in one of the first victories for the Union army. It left Newport News, with Gen. Butler’s expedition and at Fort Hatteras joined Gen. Burnside’s command, proceeding with this division of the army up Pamlico Sound to Newbern, N. C., where it fought a battle. From this point it proceeded back to Roanoke Island and from there to Newbern, participating in the battle of South Mills and in numerous skirmishes along the line of March. From Newbern the regiment proceeded through the Dismal Swamps to Norfolk, Virginia,...

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