Location: St. Clair County IL

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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Biography of Hon. Ninian Edwards

The eminent character of this gentleman requires more than a passing mention, in fact, a sketch of the early courts and bar of Christian County would be imperfect without an extended notice of him and his many public services. He has left a record in two States that time cannot efface. As a lawyer, jurist and statesman he was pre-eminently great. For nearly forty years he devoted his best energies to the service of his country, wielding an influence exceeded by few of his day and time. At the period when Judge Ninian Edwards lived his most active life, the surroundings were such as we know little or nothing of now except by tradition. The pioneer people were rough, rude, simple, sincere, honest, warm-hearted and hospitable. In the young State were the two extremes, the rude simplicity, and the gifted, brilliant children of genius, and amid these surroundings Judge Edwards trod his pathway of life, the pure politician, lawyer and statesman. He was born in 1775, in Montgomery County, Md. His father, Benjamin Edwards, was a native of Virginia, and a man of considerable prominence, having served in the Maryland Legislature, in the State Convention which ratified the Federal Constitution, and also represented his State in Congress from 1793 to 1795. Ninian Edwards graduated in Dickinson College, Pennsylvania. He studied law and medicine, and practiced the former with great success....

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The Didier Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Our country, which has been called the melting-pot of nations, has received citizens from every quarter of the known world. All races and peoples have sent their representatives to swell the numbers of our population. And of all these nations none has done more for America than France. Who can ever forget that it was the courageous Frenchmen who first penetrated the wilds of the new world, and, not content with a mere sailing along the coast, ascended its rivers and explored the interior of an unknown and dreaded wilderness? They settled vast areas such as the Mississippi Valley, which was for centuries a New France. Nor could the subsequent waves of emigration from the eastern states entirely obliterate this French civilization, which survives to this day in many names and customs found throughout the Middle West. Mr. Paulin Didier was one of those Frenchman who came to Illinois during the last century. He was born in France on December 26, 1845, and emigrated with his parents in 1847. The family settled in Cahokia, then a thriving city. With the decline of importance of Cahokia, the elder Didier left that place in 1854 and secured a farm in the vicinity of Prairie du Rocher, Illinois. Here they remained, and here the parents died in 1888. The son, who had lived with his parents all this time, now came into...

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The Siegfried Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Anton Siegfried, whose address is Red Bud, Illinois, Rural Route #3, was born in Elsass, Germany, July 26, 1852. After leaving school he worked for his father on a farm until 1872, when he immigrated to America, direct to Red Bud. For a while he worked on a farm, and in 1876 rented a farm. In 1888 he became a dealer in cattle and hogs. In 1891 he went to Ruma and opened a meat market. Seven years later he also opened a general merchandise store. Mr. Siegfried did not confine his buying to live stock, but also bought and sold farm lands. In 1910 he turned the meat market over to his sons and devotes his entire time to his merchandise business. Mr. Siegfried was married August 22, 1878, to Miss Mary Melly. Eight children were born to them, Arnold J., Leo J., Emil A. and Max M. Siegfried. Mr. Siegfried is a Democrat. He was a member of the school board for three years, and president of the Village of Ruma for two years. Besides owning the store he also owns a 120 acre farm. Mrs. Anton Siegfried is the daughter of Mike Melly. She was born May 29, 1852, in Belleville, Illinois. At the age of 7 years her parents moved to Red Bud,...

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Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1695-1956

A help guide for accessing the images of parish registers recording the events of baptism, first communion, confirmation (to 1907), marriage (to 1930) or death (to 1956) in the Diocese of Belleville (Illinois), Roman Catholic Church. The index to some volumes may reference pages within a given volume beyond current publication dates. As such, these images are not currently available. In addition to traditional parish registers, this collection includes a small number of census, church history, family and financial records. To assist the researcher I have broken down the available registers by county and name of parish, including the years covered by those parish records.

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white┬ásuccessors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty...

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Escape From The Robber Band

Monday, Nov. 8, 1819.–The disappointment experienced from the unmanly conduct of Dr. Hill had a happy effect on our little company. It bound us more firmly and nearer together, and, I may add with truth, almost fitted us for the field of battle. The hour of 9 o’clock had now arrived, the night uncommonly dark and cloudy. On our going into the house one of the strangers went into the yard and gave the Indian warwhoop three times very loud. About 10 o’clock they took their six rifles, went into the yard with a candle and shot them off one by one, snuffing the candle at forty yards every shot. They then loaded afresh, primed and picked their flints. A large horn was then taken from the loft and blown distinctly three times very loud. All those signals (which we had been told of) brought no more of the company. They then dispatched two of their own party, who were gone until 12 o’clock. They stated to their comrades “they could not be had.” It may be readily imagined, after what we had overhead, seeing such preparations and observing many of their private signals, being warned of our danger previous to stopping at the house, together with the recent and cruel murders which had been committed, in a strange country, where every man made and executed his own law...

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Biography of Francis Xavier Paquet

FRANCIS X. PAQUET. – Francis Xavier Paquet, son of Joseph Paquet and Marie Madaline Godant, was born in the parish of Saint John, about thirty miles west of Quebec, at the junction of the Jacquarka river with the St. Lawrence. Joseph Paquet was a stonemason by trade, but lived on a farm and took jobs of stonework. He was the father of eighteen children, nine boys and nine girls. F.X. Paquet, the sixteenth child in order, was born on the fifteenth day of January, 1811. He learned the trade of shipbuilding at Quebec, being apprenticed to Peter Labbe when not quite fourteen years of age. When seventeen years of age, he emigrated to the Untied States, engaging himself to the American Fur Company, to go to Mackinaw and construct a schooner for said company. After the schooner was completed he took charge of her and engaged in boating wood from Linwood Island and Round Island, and also made a trip to Chicago to get oak timber for staves and for building small boats called Mackinaw boats. This schooner was named Eliza Stewart, after the wife of Robert Stewart, who was the head man of the American Fur Company at Mackinaw at that time. That was in 1828. Old man Beaubien was then head man at what was afterwards Chicago, and which then consisted of three or four small log...

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Biographical Sketch of George H. Moser

George H. Moser, a well known and successful homeopathic physician of Arcola, was born in Auburn, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1859, and is the son of John Moser, a native of the same state. His mother was Alvinia Hellig, who was a descendant of Quaker ancestry. The Moser family are descendants of the Dutch, whose lineage is traced back by some of the members to Daniel Moser, who made his settlement in Pennsylvania in the year 1799. Doctor Moser came west and early in life turned his attention to the study of medicine. After a thorough preparation he entered the Homeopathic Medical College of Missouri, at St. Louis, which is one of the leading medical institutions of the west, and was graduated with distinguished honors in the class of 1889-90. He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Belleville, Illinois, where he remained in active practice for two years. Then he removed to Bond County, where he was located until 1895, when, on the 12th of October, in the same year, he came to Arcola. He came here with a fixed purpose of making Arcola and vicinity his field of work, and time has proven that he has made no mistake in his location. He almost immediately got into a paying practice, and within the last year he has all the business that he could possibly...

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Biography of Alexander T. Primm, Jr.

Alexander T. Primm, Jr., widely known as a substantial citizen of St. Louis, thoroughgoing, reliable and energetic, is now a vice president of the J. Kennard & Sons Carpet Company, having entered the employ of the company on October 2, 1882. He was born in Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois, April 12, 1864, and is a representative of one of the pioneer families of that locality. His ancestral history is an interesting one. The Primm family are descended from Alexander De La Pryme, a gentleman of the town of Ypres, France, who was granted a patent of gentility by the Roman pontiff for meritorious services under Phillip of Alsace in the Second Crusade. The family, having embraced the faith of the reformed church, were forced to leave the continent under order of Cardinal Richelieu following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, at which time they settled in England. Abraham De La Pryme removed to the Isle of Man in 1725 and his second son, John De La Pryme, emigrated to America, settling in what is now Stafford county, Virginia, about 1750. In deference to the prejudice existing against French names, the prefix De La was dropped and the spelling changed to the present form. The eldest son of John De La Pryme was John Primm (II) who served as a soldier in the Revolutionary army for seven years...

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Biography of Percy H. Swahlen, M. D.

Dr. Percy H. Swahlen, a representative of the medical profession in St. Louis, well known as an obstetrician and gynecologist, was born in Lebanon, Illinois, June 4, 1877. His father, the late William F. Swahlen, was a native of Wheeling, West Virginia, and was descended from one of the old Pennsylvania families. His grandfather, John Swahlen, who was born in the land of the Alps, came to America in 1820. He married Ann Gibbons, a descendant of the Cope family, early residents of Pennsylvania and members of the Society of Friends or Quakers. William F. Swahlen was well known in educational circles, becoming one of the professors of McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois, and later in De Pauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, where he remained until his death. He was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, April 19, 1839, and had therefore reached the age of seventy-seven years when he passed away in Greencastle, February 19, 1916. He was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and first entered upon educational work at McKendree College of Lebanon, Illinois. As the years passed he won an enviable reputation by reason of the ability, clearness and forcefulness with which he imparted to others the knowledge that he had acquired. He married Caroline Virginia Hypes, who was born in Lebanon, Illinois, January 30, 1848, a daughter of Benjamin and Caroline (Murray) Hypes, representatives in...

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Biography of Alonzo Leo Fitzporter, M. D.

Dr. Alonzo Leo Fitzporter, physician and surgeon of St. Louis, in which city he was born July 23, 1884, is a son of Dr. John L. Fitzporter, who passed away June 15, 1915, at the age of seventy-six years, having long figured prominently as a representative of the medical profession in this city. Dr. A. L. Fitzporter attended the parochial schools of St. Louis and afterward became a student in the St. Louis University, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1906 and then entered upon his medical course, winning his M. D. degree in 1910. Following his graduation he served for eighteen months as interne in the Alexian Brothers Hospital and in the St. Francis Hospital of Colorado Springs, Colorado. With his return to St. Louis he entered upon private practice and devoting his attention to the general work of the profession has made steady progress through the intervening years. He belongs to the St. Louis, Missouri State and American Medical Associations. During the World war he was a first lieutenant of the Medical Corps, stationed at Camp Lee, Petersburg, Virginia, volunteering for service in September, 1918, and receiving his honorable discharge in May, 1919. At Belleville, Illinois, February 8, 1911, Dr. Fitzporter was married to Miss Marie Krebs, a native of that place and a daughter of Otto and Mary (Guentz) Krebs....

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Biography of Louis J. Oatman, M. D.

Dr. Louis J. Oatman, physician and surgeon of St. Louis, was born December 13, 1874, in O’Fallon, Illinois, a son of Dr. Charles R. Oatman, whose birth occurred in Belleville, Illinois, and who was of French descent. The grandfather was Dr. Christopher Lorenzo Oatman, a native of Alsace, France, when he came to America in 1832, settling in Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois, where he resided till the time of his death in 1846. He was a graduate of the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and practiced his profession as a well known and capable physician and surgeon of Illinois for many years. The mother of Dr. Louis J. Oatman was Josephine (Lemen) Oatman, a native of Illinois, and of Scotch-Irish descent, the family being founded in America by James Lemen, who came to the new world prior to the Revolutionary war, he and six brothers participating in the struggle for independence. All were clergymen of the Baptist church and to the present time each generation of the family has been represented in the clergy. The Rev. James Lemen, one of the maternal ancestors, was the founder of Bethel church, the first Baptist church established west of the Mississippi river. Mrs. Oatman passed away in 1909, at Collinsville, Illinois, when sixty years of age. She had become the mother of three sons and a daughter, but the latter...

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Biography of William A. Kelsoe

William Austin Kelsoe was born in Greenville, Bond county, Illinois, February 1, 1851. Upon the death of his mother, a few weeks later, he was committed to the care of Mrs. Sarah Phelps, of Pocahontas, in the same county, and her daughters, one of whom is now Mrs. Kate L. Doubt, a resident of St. Louis. From the age of two years until he reached manhood he was a member of the family of William and Martha Greenwood Watkins and lived with them in Pocahontas, Greenville, Vandalia and East St. Louis, Illinois, also for three years on a farm a few miles northeast of Highland, Illinois. His father, Alexander Kelsoe, circuit clerk of Bond county for twelve years, died in January, 1862, and Mr. Watkins, who was his mother’s brother, was appointed his guardian. He attended the public schools of three of the towns named and also the Greenville Institute, a private school for boys conducted by Rev. Samuel W. Marston, father of Edgar L. Marston, a St. Louis attorney in the ’80s and now a prominent New York banker. Mr. Kelsoe entered McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois, in the fall of 1866 and during the winter of 1870-1 he taught a country school in St. Clair county, Illinois. In 1872 he received the degree of A. B. from McKendree and three years later that of A. M., the intervening...

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Biography of David Stainrook Booth, M.D.

Dr. David Stainrook Booth, medical practitioner, educator and author of St. Louis, was born April 6, 1863, on his father’s plantation near Enterprise, McDonald county, Missouri. He is a son of Dr. David Stainrook Booth, Sr., and a grandson of Dr. John Jefferson Booth, of Philadelphia. That the family of Booth is of great antiquity is evidenced by the following from a history of the family: “At the time of the conquest, in 1066, we find the de-la-Booths accompanying William the Conqueror to England. Evidences also, there are, that go to show that when William the Conqueror was distributing the confiscated English lands among his followers of rank, among others who were recipients were the de-la-Booths, to whom was given lands to have and to hold by the same right and title as that possessed by the king and queen. The right to title and possession through conquest by the sword.’ He also conferred upon the de-la-Booths his coat-of-arms ‘to have and to hold, so long as the name of Booth shall exist, because ye are of my blood.’ . The best genealogical evidence obtainable points direct to the family of Adam de Booth, residing at ‘Booths,’ Lancashire, England, A. D. 1200, as the immediate family from whom all Booths of America are descended. In the line of descendants of this Adam de Booth there have been many eminent...

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