Location: St. Charles County MO

Biographical Sketch of John Chambers

John Chambers, of Ireland, settled in North Carolina and married Mary Thompson, of Kentucky, by whom he had John, Jr., William, Sarah, James, Thomas, Alexander, Nancy, and Jane. In 1798 Mr. Chambers came to Missouri and settled in St. Louis County, and in 1800 his wife died. After that he lived with his son, Thomas, in St. Charles. Thomas married Eleanor Kennedy, and the names of their children were Prospect, Riley, Sarah, Julia, Harriet, Davis H., Ellen, Rhoda, and Thomas, Jr. Thomas and Alexander Chambers were rangers together in Captain Musick’s company, and were at the battle of the sinkhole in (now) Lincoln County. Alexander married the widow of Frank McDermid, who was killed at Callaway’s defeat. Her maiden name was Ruth Costlio. James, son of John Chambers, Sr., was a tanner and lived in (now) Warren...

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Biographical Sketch of William Hancock

William Hancock was a pioneer of both Kentucky and Missouri. In the former State he helped to fight the Indians and guard the forts, and experienced the dangers and privations of those times. He came to Missouri among the first Americans who sought homes here, and was the first settler on the Missouri river bottom, in Warren County, which has since borne his name. He was married in St. Charles County to a Miss McClain, by whom he had three children, two daughters awl a son named William, Jr. The latter died at home, unmarried. One of the daughters, named Mary, married Capt. Hamilton, and they now live on the old homestead: Capt. Hamilton served with distinction in the war with Mexico. The other daughter married Dr. George Y. Bast, of New Florence, Mo. Mr. Hancock was a jovial man, and fond of practical jokes. He and Anthony Wyatt and Jacob Darst once took a flat-boat loaded with pork and peltries to Natchez, Miss., and while there they concocted a plan to show Darst who was a devil-may-care sort of a man-as a wild man of the forest. Accordingly they rigged him out in an appropriate costume, and exhibited him with great succes, the room being crowded with visitors during the entire exhibition. Darst enjoyed the joke equally as well as his two companions, and they all reaped a...

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Biography of Jasper S. Martin

Jasper S. Martin is well known in financial circles of north-eastern Oklahoma as cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Vinita, with which he has been identified for the past nineteen years, and has promoted the success of the institution by systematic, progressive and conscientious work. He was born in St. Charles, Missouri, April 12, 1880, of the union of Rev. George M. and Hardenia (Tyler) Martin, also natives of that state, the former born in Saline County and the latter in St. Charles County. The father continued to engage in farming in Missouri until 1889, when he. came to Indian Territory, establishing his home near Vinita, where he devoted his attention to the raising of fine driving horses, being the owner of Rex Forrest; one of the most noted horses in the country. He was also a minister of the Baptist Church, taking up religious work when he was twenty-one years of age and continuing active along that line until his demise in February, 1918, at the age of seventy-eight. During his later years he lived retired in Vinita. The mother passed away on the farm near the town in 1905. The father was a Democrat in his political views and fraternally was identified with the Masonic order. Mr. Martin passed the days of his boyhood on the home farm in Craig County, attending the public schools of...

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Biographical Sketch of John Preston

John Preston was left an orphan when very young, but at eight years of age he was adopted by an old gentleman and his wife, who were very kind to him. They took him to Rock Castle Co., Kentucky, and educated him, as though he had been their own son. When he was of age he married Jane Day, and came to St. Charles County, Missouri, in 1820. They had eleven children, only five of whom lived to be grown. Their names were Frank L., Mary W., Caroline V., Liberty M., and Fanny H. Mr. Preston and his wife were the first members of the Old Baptist Church at...

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Zumwalt, Andrew Jackson – Obituary

A. J. Zumwalt, pioneer and member of the Oregon legislature in 1880, died today [January 2, 1915] at his farm near Irving, five miles north of Eugene. Death, occurring at the age of 82 years, followed an attack of pneumonia, which kept him in bed for several weeks. A. J. Zumwalt was one of eleven children of Solomon and Nancy Zumwalt, pioneers, from whom have sprung 150 children, grandchildren and great grandchildren now living in Lane County. They comprise one of the county’s largest pioneer families. A. J. Zumwalt was born in St. Charles County, Missouri, September 2, 1832. His parents and the eleven children started to Oregon with an ox team in April, 1850, and they wintered at Salt Lake City. In the spring they pushed on and reached Portland July 4, 1851. The family spent the summer in Polk County, and came to Eugene in the fall. Here the father took up a homestead, two miles west of the city. On February 18, 1855, A. J. Zumwalt married Margaret M. Walker. The children of this marriage still living are: Mrs. Mattie Bond of Eugene, Mrs. Addie Jennings of Spokane, E. W. Zumwalt of Irving. After the death of his wife, November 7, 1873, he purchased a farm at Irving, and on April 29, 1875, he married Lavina M. Brown. The living children of this marriage are: Mrs....

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A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri

A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri was written by William Bryan in 1876. William along with his associate, Robert Rose, traversed by horse across five counties in the state of Missouri interviewing families for the information found in this manuscript. As such, readers should not use this as the Gospel for these early Missouri families. Research is warranted to validate what the families claimed, as they were often in error, merely detailing the information passed down to them. Even William acknowledged such in his preface to the book. The five counties included were: Audrain, Callaway, Montgomery, St....

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Biography of Mrs. Julia A. McCarver

MRS. JULIA A. McCARVER. – Julia A. McCoy was born November 19, 1825, in St. Charles county, Missouri. Her parents died before she was three years old; and she was brought up by her grandfather and grandmother. At an early age she was married to Garrett Buckalew, and thereafter lived in the State of Illinois until the spring of 1847, when, with her husband and two children, and the families of eighteen neighbors, she started across the plains for Oregon. At St. Joseph, Missouri, they joined a host of other emigrants, the combined party including ninety families, who continued their journey to its destination under the guidance and command of Captain Joel Palmer, who had already twice crossed the continent, and was then after his family. Mrs. Buckalew lost her youngest child on the plains; and, while crossing the Blue Mountains in Eastern Oregon, her husband contracted a cold from which he died in a few days at Philip Foster’s place on the western slope of the Cascade Mountains. In 1848 she married general M.M. McCarver, who had crossed the plains in 1843, and whose letters to other friends in Illinois induced the Buckalews to come to Oregon. They took a Donation claim near Oregon City, the then chief town of the North Pacific region, where they made their home for eleven years. In the spring of 1849, Mrs....

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Biographical Sketch of Darst, Abraham

Abraham Darst came to Texas in the early ’20 from St. Charles County, Missouri, and settled at Damon’s Mound. This famous mound is situated partly in Fort Bend County and partly in Brazoria, all of the league of Mr. Darst being in the latter county. He was married twice, the children of the first wife being Emery, John, Edmund and Patrick. By his last wife were Rosetta and Richard. Emery Darst married Miss Mary Ann Moore. She was born in St. Charles County, Mo., and died in 1902, in the eighty-third year of her age. Her people came to Texas in 1827, when she was about seven years of age. Her father was Elisha Moore, also a native, of Missouri, and a relative of Daniel Boone. Benjamin Boone, a Mier prisoner who died in Blanco County a few years ago, was a cousin to Mary Ann Moore. Lon Moore, an old settler and, Indian fighter of Medina County, also says that he is related to Daniel Boone, and must be a branch of the same family. Some of the Darsts moved further west, and a creek in Guadalupe County is named for them. Some settled at Gonzales, and one was killed in the Alamo. Dave Darst and his family were the last ones to leave Gonzales on the approach of the Mexicans, and before they had proceeded far the...

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