Location: St. Charles County MO

Biographical Sketch of Miles Price

Miles Price, of Wales, settled in Lincoln County, N. C., prior to the revolutionary war. He married a Miss Sharp, and had a son named Thomas, who was a soldier of the revolution. He married Isabella Sharp, and they had Elizabeth, Thomas, jr., Reese, Isaac, James, John, Isabella, and Ellen Zohn married Anna Barber, of North Carolina, and they had four children previous to their removal to Missouri, viz.: Elizabeth L., Cynthia, Miles S., and Thomas J. They came to Missouri and settled in Pike County in 1819, after which they had the following children Robert B., John H., Sallie A., Emily I., and Lucinda J. All of his children except Miles S., who is a member of the County Court of Montgomery County, settled in Lincoln County. Mr. Price was Constable and Justice of the Peace in Pike County for thirty years. He was also a great snake killer, and every spring he and his neighbors would have a snake hunt. One spring they killed 9,000 rattlesnakes. Isaac Price first settled in St. Charles County, and afterward in Lincoln. He married Tabitha Wilkerson, of the former...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel Pegram

The parents of Daniel Pegram were Scotch. Daniel was born in Petersburg, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County, where he raised ten children, six sons and four daughters, each of whom was more than six feet in height. Thomas, a son of Daniel Pegram, married Nancy Hopkins, whose mother’s maiden name was Clark, and who had a brother, Chester Clark,, who drew $100,000 in a lottery. Thomas had but three children James L., Edward T., and William. The latter died in Virginia in his 19th year. James L. married Julia R. Oley, of Virginia, and settled in St. Charles County, Mo., in 1839, and in Montgomery County in 1845. Mrs. Pegram died in 1863. They had eight children, four sons and four daughters. Edward T. Pegram married Mildred Crane, of Montgomery County, and had two children, a son and a...

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Biography of Peter VanBibber

Peter and Isaac VanBibber, of Holland, came to America and settled in Botetourt Co., Va., previous to the revolution. Peter married Marguety Bounds, and they had Peter, Jr., Jesse, Jacob, James, Joseph, Matthias, Nancy, Sophronia, Ellen, and Olive. James married Jane Irvine, and settled in St. Charles County in 1803. He was Coroner at the time William Hays was killed by his son-in-law, James Davis. In 1817 he removed to Callaway County, and settled on the Auxvasse. His children were Joseph, Irvine, Frances. Lucinda, Melissa, Daniel and Minerva. Joseph was a surveyor and made the government surveys in range eight, west of the fifth principal meridian. Olive VanBibber married Nathan Boone. Isaac VanBibber, Brother of Peter, was Captain of a company in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774, and was killed there. He left, a widow and four children John, Peter, Isaac and Rebecca. John and Peter married and settled in Powell’s Valley, East Tennessee. Isaac was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., October 20, 1771, and was only two and a half years old when his father was killed. He was adopted and raised by Colonel Daniel Boone, and at the early age of thirteen years acted as a scout against the Indians in Virginia. In 1800 he came to Missouri with Nathan Boone, and settled first in Darst’s Bottom. During the Indian war he was Major of...

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Biography of Natley Dutton

Natley Dutton and wife, of England, settled in Maryland some time after Lord Baltimore began to colonize that State. Their son, Natley, Jr., was born and raised in Maryland. He had a son, named John H., who was born in 1790. Mr. Dutton died when his son was eleven years of age, and two years afterward his mother had him bound out to learn the ship carpenter’s trade. He worked at that business fourteen years. In the meantime his mother had married a Mr. Elton, whose father was a Quaker and came to America with William Penn. They had a son named Thomas T. Elton, and in 1818, he and his half-brother, John H. Dutton, in company with Philip Glover, started to Missouri. They traveled in a wagon to Wheeling, Virginia, where they bought a flat-boat, and loading their wagon and team into it, they floated clown to Maysville, Kentucky, where they traded their flat-boat for a keel-boat, transferred their property to it, and proceeded to Louisville. There they sold their boat and came by land to Missouri. They located first in St. Charles County, where they rented land and lived two years. They then entered land on North Bear creek, in Montgomery County, and settled there. Mr. Elton married Eleanor Glover, and raised a large family of children. He subsequently removed to Grant County, Wisconsin, where he now...

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Biographical Sketch of George Farrow

The parents of George Farrow came from Scotland, and settled in Fauquier Co., Va., where George was born. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married a Miss Massey, and they had George, Jr., Nimrod, John, and Benjamin also two daughters. Benjamin married Lucy Smith, of Virginia, and they had John P., George, Mortimer, Joseph, Margaret, Sarah, Liney M., Mary L., and Amanda M. John P., Sarah, and Margaret came to Missouri. Sarah married William Browning, and settled in St. Charles County, but afterward removed to Lincoln County. Margaret married James B. Barton, and settled in St. Charles County. John P. was married in Virginia, to Susan M. Smith, and settled in St. Charles County in 1836. He subsequently removed to Troy, where he was employed in a store, and in 1844 he settled in Montgomery County, where he was elected Judge of the County Court, and held the office for twenty years. He afterward removed to Crawford Co.,...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Woodruff

Charles Woodruff, of Buckingham Co., Va., married a Miss Gatewood, and their son, Wyatt P., married Mary Talphro, and settled in St. Louis Co.; Mo., in 1825. In 1827 they removed to St. Charles County, and from there to Montgomery County in 1832. They had John, Charles E., Robert H., Francis S., and David B. all of whom live in Montgomery...

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Biography of Stephen Ham

Stephen Ham lived and died in Madison Co., Ky. He was the father of John, Jabez, and Stephen Ham, Jr. John was born in Kentucky in 1786, and came to Missouri in 1809, and settled in St. Charles County. He joined Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and served during the Indian war. In 1816 he and Jonathan Crow built a bark tent on Auxvasse creek, now in Callaway County, and lived in it for some time, while they were engaged in hunting. They were, therefore, probably the first American settlers within the limits of Callaway County. Ham cut his name on a lone tree in the prairie, which has since borne his name. He was a Methodist preacher. He was married twice, first to a Miss Bennett, by whom he had two children. She died when the children were quite small, and their father took them to their relatives in Kentucky, performing the journey on horse-back, with one of the children before him and one behind. When he came to water courses that were deep enough to swim his horse, he would tie one of the children on the bank, swim across with the other, tie it, and go back for the one he had left. He afterward married a Miss Thomas, and they had six daughters. Mr. Ham was a daring hunter, and there were but few who...

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Biographical Sketch of Hazekiah Henley

Hezekiah Henley, of Virginia, had a son named Thomas O., who was married first to Martha Bugg, by whom he had William, Samuel, Thompson, John, Nancy, Martha, and Polly. After the death of his first wife he married Mary Herndon, by whom he had Allen, Wilson, Thomas, Archibald, Schuyler, Sarah, Lucinda, Amanda, and Catharine. Samuel was married twice, and settled in St. Charles County. Allen settled in Montgomery County in 1838. He married Lucy Thomas, and they had ten...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Jones

Richard Jones, who was born in England, married a Miss Love, and settled in Botetourt Co., Va. He was a member of the Baptist Church, but had to give a hogshead of tobacco every year for the support of the Episcopal Church. The names of his children were William, John, and Silas. William married Elizabeth Metcalf, and settled first in Shelby Co., Ky., from whence he removed to Missouri and settled on Darst’s Bottom, St. Charles County, in 1818. In 1820 he removed to Callaway County, and built a horse-mill, under the shed of which the Baptists held religious services for a number of years. The mill was kept by his son, William M., who afterward became a Baptist preacher, and is now a merchant at Montgomery City. William Jones’ children were Jane, Richard, Elizabeth L., Susan, William M., Minerva, Maria, Martha, and Narcissa. Jane married Robert Saylor. Richard married Unicia Davis. He afterward died of consumption, and the day before his death he was taken to the creek, on his bed, placed in a rocking chair, and baptized, chair and all, by Jabez Ham. Elizabeth L. Jones married William McCormack. William M. married Elizabeth Jones, and they had twelve children, one of whom, Judge Robert W. Jones, has been Judge of the Probate Court of Montgomery County, and is now editor of the Standard at Montgomery City. Minerva...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Lewellyn

Jacob Lewellyn, son of Samuel Lewellyn, had a son Samuel who settled in Pike Co., Mo., at a very early date, and died in 1837. He left a son, John W., who married Jane Trabue, of Kentucky, in 1824, and had ten children, nine of whom are still living. Mr. Lewellyn lived for some time in Clarke Co., Mo., where he was Judge of the County Court for eight years. He settled in Montgomery County in 1839, having lived in St. Charles County in 1818, and in Pike County in...

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Biography of John Baptist Miege

John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and from the Missouri River west to the Rocky Mountains, being consecrated to that...

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Biography of Gray C. Briggs, M.D.

Dr. Gray C. Briggs, a well known Roentgenologist, was born in Burlington, Iowa. June 30, 1882, a son of Dr. Waldo Briggs, who became a noted surgeon of St. Louis. He was born at Bowling Green, Kentucky, July 3, 1856, his parents being William Thompson and Anna (Stubbins) Briggs. He won his professional degree on the completion of a course in the medical department of the University of Nashville, at Nashville, Tennessee, and in 1877 began practice in St. Louis. From 1895 until 1898 he was professor of surgery in Beaumont Medical College and in the latter year accepted the professorship of surgery in the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, since continuing in this position. He is also superintendent of Jefferson Hospital and is president and dean of the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He wedded Nellie Gray, a native of Jamestown, New York, who passed away at the age of forty-five years. Dr. Gray C. Briggs, their only child, was educated in the public schools of St. Louis and the Central high school, after which he became a student in the University of Chicago and later attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons of St. Louis, from which he was graduated in 1909 with the M. D. degree. Following his graduation he spent the first...

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Biography of Anthony Wayne Fairchild, M. D.

Anthony Wayne Fairchild, M. D. The work which he had done as a member of the medical profession in Fall River had already attracted much attention to Doctor Fairchild, whose attainments and abilities are much above the average. Not only does a large clientage esteem him for his services, but his wife, Mrs. Fairchild, is likewise a graduate physician and had a considerable practice, specializing in discases of the eye. The Fairchild family originated in England, coming to America in Colonial times. Doctor Fairchild’s grandfather was Minor Fairchild, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1818, and became a pioneer farmer in Missouri. He died in Chariton County of the latter state in 1899. Minor Fairchild married Miss Goodwin, who was born in Pennsylvania and died in St. Charles County, Missouri. Dr. Anthony Wayne Fairchild was born at Wentzville, Missouri, June 1, 1878. His father is H. W. Fairchild, who was born in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in 1851, but when a young man came with his parents to Wentzville, Missouri. He was married at Wentzville to Miss Emma Hines, also a native of Bradford County, Pennsylvania, where she was born in 1850. H. W. Fairchild followed school teaching and farming for many years, but finally removed to the City of St. Louis, where he was in the insurance business and subsequently became a merchant. He now lives at St. Louis...

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Biography of Caleb S. Stone, M. D.

Dr. Stone has left the ranks of the many to stand among the more successful few in a profession where advancement depends solely upon individual merit. In other walks of life, especially in commercial circles, one may enter upon a business already established and carry it on from the point where others laid it down, but the physician must rely solely upon his knowledge and ability, and these must be acquired through close and earnest application. That Dr. Stone, of Wallace, is numbered among the leading physicians and surgeons of his section of the state is therefore evidence of his power in his chosen calling. A native of Missouri, he was born May 10, 1859, his parents being Robert Harris and Eliza (Rodes) Stone, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, and are now deceased. The father died in Missouri, in 1881, at the age of sixty-five years, and the mother in Texas, when about thirty-five years of age. Mr. Stone engaged in merchandising throughout his business career. The Doctor obtained his preliminary education in the common schools of his native state, and supplemented it by study in an academy for boys at Little Rock, Arkansas, and in Woodlawn Seminary, at St. Charles, Missouri. He began the study of medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, at the age of seventeen years, and in 1879 he went to Leadville, Colorado, where he...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Gray

When Robert Gray was a small boy he lost his father, while they were moving from North Carolina to Tennessee. He had four sisters Polly, Dorcas, Elizabeth, and Jane. After the death of his father, his mother proceeded on her way to Tennessee, with her children; and they remained in that State until 1809, when they came to (now) Warren County, Mo. During the Indian war they lived the greater portion of the time in Castlio’s Fort, in St. Charles County. Polly Gray married Rueben Thornhill, Dorcas, Barney Thornhill and Jane Bryant Thornhill, all of whom were early settlers of Warren County. Elizabeth married Job Stark, who was also an early settler of Warren County. Robert married Elizabeth Liles, by whom he had James, Milton, Henry, Elizabeth, and Jane, only a part of whom lived to be...

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