Location: South Bend Indiana

Slave Narrative of Alex & Elizabeth Smith

Interviewer: Henrietta Karwowski Person Interviewed: Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith Location: South Bend, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: 127 North Lake Street, South Bend, Indiana Henrietta Karwowski, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 South Bend, Indiana EX-SLAVES MR. AND MRS. ALEX SMITH 127 North Lake Street South Bend, Indiana Mr. and Mrs. Alex Smith, an eighty-three year old negro couple were slaves in Kentucky near Paris, Tennessee, as children. They now reside at 127 North Lake Street, on the western limits of South Bend. This couple lives in a little shack patched up with tar paper, tin, and wood. Mrs. Elizabeth Smith, the talkative member or the family is a small woman, very wrinkled, with a stocking cap pulled over her gray hair. She wore a dress made of three different print materials; sleeves of one kind, collar of another and body of a third. Her front teeth were discolored, brown stubs, which suggested that she chews tobacco. Mr. Alex Smith, the husband is tall, though probably he was a well built man at one time. He gets around by means of a cane. Mrs. Smith said that he is not at all well, and he was in the hospital for six weeks last winter. The wife, Elizabeth or Betty, as her husband calls her, was a slave on the Peter Stubblefield plantation in Kentucky,...

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Biography of William H. Smith

William H. Smith. It is almost a half century that had crept around on the world’s clock since William H. Smith, one of Chanute’s substantial and respected citizens, came to Kansas, locating in Neosho County, where at present he is held in high esteem with the Old Settlers’ Association, of which he is president. With interest he had watched this section develop and had assisted very materially, ever lending his influence to law and order, encouraging the investment of capital, and setting an industrious example that might very profitably be emulated. William H. Smith was born January 25, 1846, in Warren County, Ohio. His parents were Samuel M. and Phebe (Wharton) Smith. The early records of the Smith family show that in colonial times there were pioneering members who dared the dangers of the deep and crossed the Atlantic Ocean from England to America, finding harbor in New Jersey, and from these descended Abram C. Smith, who was the grandfather of William H. Smith of Chanute, Kansas. He was born in New Jersey in 1781, was a quiet, peaceful farmer who removed with his family to Warren County, Ohio, in 1835 and died there in 1867. The family were Quakers. Samuel M. Smith, father of William H., was born near Camden, New Jersey, in 1817, and died at the latter’s home at Chanute, in February, 1902. He came to...

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Schricker, Richard Alex – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Richard Alex Schricker, 65, of Baker City and formerly of La Grande, died Aug. 11 in Phoenix, Ariz. A viewing will run from 3 to 8 p.m. today at Coles Funeral Home in Baker City. A memorial service begins at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Agape Christian Center in Baker City with a reception immediately following at the church. Pastor Garth Johnson will officiate. A graveside service with military honors will follow at 3 p.m. at Hillcrest East Cemetery in La Grande. Richard was born March 7, 1943, to Richard Clifford and Patricia Louise (Wynegar) Schricker in South Bend, Ind. He graduated from high school in 1961 at Garden Grove, Calif. Richard served in the U.S. Navy for four years and then in the National Guard for 16 years. He ranked as seaman and sergeant first class. Richard worked as the fire cache manager for the U.S. Forest Service in La Grande, retiring in November 2003. He married Leslie Perrigo in March 1968 at The Dalles. The couple remained married until she died in September 2007. Richard enjoyed traveling, sightseeing and meeting new people. He was a member of the Agape Christian Center in Baker City and a volunteer at the Powder River Correctional Facility. He is survived by his children, Jeffery Schricker of McCall, Idaho, and Jayme Schricker of John Day; mother, Patricia L. Perry...

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Biographical Sketch of J. D. Cassell

J. D. Cassell, proprietor Cassell’s Restaurant, Mattoon; was born in Montgomery Co., Penn., A. D. 1827; until he was 17 or 18 years of age, he passed his life upon the farm, deriving his education mostly from the common schools; in 1854, he came West to Jennings Co., Ind., where he remained one year; he then went to Crawfordsville, Ind., and was a student in Wabash College a short time; he next engaged in the merchant tailoring business there for two or three years; leaving Crawfordsville, he next located in South Bend, remaining one year; in the fall of 1859, he moved to New Carlisle, Ind., and engaged in teaching school; here he remained three and one-half years, most of the time engaged as a Professor in the Collegiate Institute; in the spring of 1863, he moved to Rolling Prairie, taught one year, and, in the fall of 1864, engaged in the grocery trade; in the spring of 1866, he was appointed and commissioned Postmaster, which position he held eight years; in the fall of 1874, he came to Mattoon and engaged in his present occupation. He was first married in 1858, to Elizabeth France, a native of Ohio; she died, in 1868. His second marriage occurred in 1369, to Nancy J. Bolster of New York State; she died in 1870; he has four children – Annie B., Lydia...

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Biographical Sketch of Parsons Gleason

PARSONS GLEASON. – Mr. Parsons Gleason is one of the oldest and most venerable of our pioneers now living, having been born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1799. At the age of six years he moved with his father to Western New York, and at the age of twenty-one went out to Indiana, and three years later had drifted as far as the Indian Territory, and was with the missionaries for three years among the Osage Indians. Three years later he went on to Indiana, making his home at South Bend. In tat state he married and made his residence, forming a great attachment to the old military hero and political chieftain, W.H. Harrison, with whom he became intimately acquainted. In 1851 he made the great journey across the plains to Oregon, thereby becoming one of the earliest settlers in our state. he made his home at the place first humorously called “Hard Scrabble,” but later translated as “Needy,” in Clackamas county. Here he has passed a long, active and honorable life, and still lives at the age of...

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