Location: Solano County CA

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Allan R. Powers

The thriving industrial center and model city of South San Francisco exerts a strong attraction upon the professional man as well as the captain of industry and business man. This is exemplified by the coming to this community of Dr. Allan R. Powers and other capable professional men who saw an excel field wherein to build up a desirable practice. Dr. Powers was located at Rio Vista, Solano County for two years before coming to San Mateo County Before he took up his study of medicine he was in the United States Forest Service. Dr. Powers received his university education at the University of California, graduating in 1901, with a degree of B. S. He attended Cornell and Yale in the east, and received his degree of M. F. from the latter institution in 1904. He graduated from Cooper Medical College as M. D. in 1912. In addition to an extensive practice already acquired in South San Francisco, he is the District Surgeon at that city for the Southern Pacifc Co. Dr. Powers was born at San Rafael, California, on May 23, 1881, and has been a resident of this state for thirty-four years. His home is now at 628 Grand Ave., South San Francisco. In the month of August, 1913, Dr. Powers was married in Sacramento. He had one child, Edith Cornelia Powers, who died December 21, 1915....

Read More

Biography of David Murray

DAVID MURRAY. – This gentleman is a well-known capitalist. He has retired from active business, and is now reaping the benefits of a life full of even and unceasing hard work. David Murray is a name that every youngster in the Kittitass valley, Washington, is familiar with. It might be well for those very same youths if they had a few of the hardships to go through that Mr. Murray did in his early life. He was born in Maine in 1831, and at the age of twenty left his home to seek his fortunes in the Golden state of California. he embarked onboard one of the sailing vessels that brought a dry dock to the Pacific coast. Rounding the “Horn” with that massive bulk in cargo was no very safe undertaking. However, reaching California, he settled at Vallejo, on San Francisco Bay; and, not having been overstocked with money upon leaving his home, he was forced to accept what work he could obtain. He did the first work that was ever done on Mare Island, where the government works and navy yard now are. After finishing his employment there, he led a life of various pursuits for a period of ten years, among which were mining, lumbering and ranching during the great Caribou gold excitement of 1862 he made his way to that field, and took up a...

Read More

Biography of Benjamin and Hosea Eastman

Tales of heroism have been the theme of song and story throughout all ages. He who has gone forth to battle for his country, his home or his principles, has figured in history, in literature and in music, and his bravery has stirred the souls of men through all times. All honor to such an one, and yet his heroism is no greater or his daring more pronounced than that of the honored pioneers of the west. Men reared in comfortable homes, accustomed to all the conveniences and privileges of life in the east, have come into the wild western districts and braved danger and hardships untold. Cut off from all comforts and luxuries, they have also had to face death at the hand of the treacherous Indian, and in little bands and oft times singly they have had to fight for liberty and life. Volumes have been written, yet the story of the pioneers has never been adequately told. They deserve all praise and honor and the mighty states of the west with their splendid improvements, enterprises and tokens of civilization are monuments to their memory. The Eastman Brothers, Benjamin Manson and Hosea Bradford, are among those who have founded the state of Idaho and brought about her present prosperity and greatness. They are now numbered among the leading business men of Boise, where many important business interests...

Read More

Biography of William F. Sommercamp

William F. Sommercamp, the leading merchant of Weiser, Idaho, is a native son of the golden west. He was born in California, February 16, 1860, and comes of German ancestry. His father, William F. Sommercamp, was born in Germany and when a young man emigrated to America, landing at New Orleans, where for a time he followed his trade, that of confectioner. Subsequently he married Miss Mary Slack, of Zanesville, Ohio, and shortly after their marriage they removed to California, where he engaged in mining. In 1864 he came over into Idaho and became one of the prominent miners and stock-raisers of Owyhee County. He died in the sixty-second year of his age. His widow is living, aged fifty-nine years, and of their children, three daughters and seven sons, only four are now living, three sons and a daughter. William F., the subject of this sketch, is the eldest of the family. He was in his fifth year when they moved to Idaho and located in Silver City, and in the public schools of this place his education was begun. Later he attended St. Augustine College, at Benicia, and, after clerking three years in a mercantile establishment, took a course in Heald’s Business College, San Francisco, where he graduated in due time. After his graduation he accepted a position in a San Francisco wholesale house, where he remained three...

Read More

Biography of Peter Goyette

PETER GOYETTE.- Energetic and enterprising, the subject of this sketch has passed a life of marked activity in the various places where he has migrated, having been in Union county for one-third of a century in which time he has been one of the most successful of its army of agriculturists and stockmen. Mr. Goyette is possessed of all the fervor of the Gallic nature with its vividness and practical powers of accomplishment, and although not native born, has like so many of that noted race, made a most commendable record for patriotism and stability in stanch support of the free institutions of his foster land. He was born to Antoine and Rose (Gouse) Goyette, natives of Canada, in East Canada, near Montreal, on April 5, 1841. There he received his education and remained on the farm with his parents until 1858, when his spirit of adventure led him to the “States.” He landed in Burlington, Vermont and went to work at brick-making, cutting wood in the winter, following this for two years, and then took a place in the cotton mills at Three Rivers, Massachusetts, at eleven dollars per month, his board costing eight of that. Three months of this service was sufficient for his restless spirit and on February 5, 1860, he, in company with his cousin and a friend, boarded the steamer Golden Gate and made...

Read More

Sanders, S. G. – Obituary

North Powder, Union County, Oregon Word has been received by Mrs. Emil R. Miller, of the death of her father, S.G. Sanders, of Vallejo, Cal. Samuel Guy Sanders was born in Portland and was a son of the late I.N. Sanders. He was about 56 years old. He grew up at North Powder on the old Sanders ranch. Besides the daughter, he leaves to mourn his loss, a wife, an aged mother, Mrs. Ascenith F. Sanders of Salem, two sisters, Mrs. Paul Swafford of Salem. Mrs. Orie Holmes, Ostrander, Wash., three brothers, Joe of Scio, Or. Ed, of Los Angeles, and Dr. O.N. Sanders, formerly of Halfway, but now located in Salem, several nieces and nephews and two grand daughters, Joyce and Mayme Miller of Baker. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, October 22,...

Read More

Patwin Tribe

Patwin Indians (‘man,’ ‘person’). A name adopted by Powers to designate a division of the Copehan family. They occupied the area extending from Stony creek, Colusa County, to Suisun Bay, Solano County, California, and from Sacramento river to the boundary of the Kulanapan family on the west, but excluding the so-called Coyote Valley Indians on the headwaters of Putah creek in the south part of Lake County, determined by Barrett to be Moquelumnan and not Copehan. The dialects of this division differ considerably from those of the Wintun. Powers believed the Patwin were once very numerous. The manners and customs of the tribes in the interior and on the mountains differed greatly from those near the shore. On the plains and in the valleys in building a dwelling they excavated the soil for about 2 feet, banked up enough earth to keep out the water, and threw the remainder on the roof in a dome. In the mountains, where wood was more abundant and rain more frequent, no roofing of earth was used. In war the Patwin used bows and arrows and flint-pointed spears; no scalps were taken, but the victors are said often to have decapitated the most beautiful maiden they captured. They had a ceremony for “raising evil spirits” and dances to celebrate a good harvest of acorns or a successful catch of fish. The dead were...

Read More

Biography of William R. Russell

William R. Russell, one of the earliest settlers of Riverside and for many years a leading horticulturist of the colony, is a native of Holt County, Missouri, born in 1840, son of John and Margaret (Oiler) Russell, the former a descendant of a prominent Southern family and a native of Kentucky, who early in life settled in Ohio and was there married, his wife being a native of Virginia. In 1840 he moved to Missouri and settled in the county where the subject of this sketch was born. When William was fourteen years of age, his father crossed the plains for California, locating in Solano County, where he engaged in stock farming and the dairy business. Henry, a brother of William, had preceded the family to this State in 1846; he came as a member of Fremont’s command and participated in the Mexican War; he died in Solano County in 1862. Mr. Russell was raised as a farmer and stock-grower, being associated with his father in that enterprise until 1869, when he returned east and for the next five years was engaged in various occupations in the Western states. Returning to California he sought a desirable place to locate; and in 1875 he came to Riverside, purchasing upon his arrival a ten-acre tract in Brockton square, and entered into horticultural pursuits. He fully improved that place and sold it...

Read More

Biography of Mrs. C. B. Cary

MRS. C.B. CARY. – This refined woman and intelligent lady, one of our earliest pioneers, comes of one of the old Virginia families of English or Cavalier origin; whose members, in the early days of the Old Dominion, took and held an advanced social position. She was born at Richmond in 1815, and at the age of four moved to Kentucky with her father, William Taylor. In 1831 she was married to Miles S. Cary, one of the pioneer sons of Kentucky, with his full share of southern chivalrousness and western energy. In 1835 they moved to Missouri, and were prospered in their efforts to make a home and carry on business. In the winter of 1842, however, their attention was called to the advantages of Oregon by a neighbor of theirs, a certain Squire Vivian, a merchant, who, on a visit to St. Louis on business, had found a pamphlet on Oregon written by Doctor Whitman, and was so much impressed by the value and possibilities of that country as there described that he determined to go thither the coming summer. The Carys, reading the document, also formed the same purpose. The Squire was unable to accomplish the design owing to the sickness of his wife; but the Cary’s collected their all into wagons and early in the spring of 1843, set out for the rendezvous on the...

Read More

Biography of Sidney S. Benton

SIDNEY S. BENTON. – This pioneer of Illinois, California and Washington is one of those facile, multiplex characters that give to our Western life its buoyancy. He was born in the first-named State in 1838, while Chicago was yet in her swamps, and his father was at that city in 1831, when it was a mere Indian trading post, and also at Galena, the home of the Grants, in 1832. His father came out to California with ox-teams amid Indians, and over the usual sage-brush plains, and the iron-stone rocks in 1849. He mined on Feather river in Yuba county, and in 1852 went to Siskiyou county, where he followed mining and merchandising. Sidney arrived in 1856 via Panama at Yreka, and mined near that city and in Scott’s valley until 1861. In that year he went to Nevada, working on the Comstock; for six years he was underground foreman of the Savage mine, making money and losing it. In Siskiyou county and Surprise valley, and at Dixon in Solano county, California, he engaged again in business. At the latter place, in 1863, he met an old acquaintance from Wisconsin, Miss Mattie E. Bowmer. She and her brother had come the year before from the East in the company which had been attacked on the Upper Snake river by Indians, who killed twenty-eight of the party. Some fifteen years...

Read More

Hills, Glenda L. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Glenda L. Hills, 55, of Baker City, died Nov. 21, 2000, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. At her request there will be no funeral. Coles-Strommer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Ms. Hills was born Nov. 13, 1945, at Vallejo, Calif., to Guy F. and Fordyce (Willian) Hills. She moved to Oregon when she was five years old and lived in many communities within the state. She graduated from Heppner High School in 1964, and attended Blue Mountain Community College for one year. After her schooling she made her home in Idaho. While living in Caldwell, Idaho, she met Mike Monroe, whom she has been with for the past 24 years. They moved from Caldwell to Baker City in 1980. Ms. Hills was a member of the M.C. International Motorcycle Club and the Blue Mountain Bikers, Riders and Rednecks. She is survived by her companion, Mike Monroe of Baker City; her parents, Guy and Fordyce Hills of Ontario; her son, Phillip G. Hills of Nampa, Idaho, and her daughter, Bunny Brink of Nampa; a grandson, Phillip “Guy” Hills II of Nampa; and two sisters, Stella Ellison of Parma, Idaho, and Alice Sweeney of Ontario. Used with permission from: The Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, November 24, 2000 Transcribed by: Belva...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Edward T. McGettigan

About five months ago a new Chamber of Commerce sprang into existence in Redwood City that has already done as much for the advancement of its chosen field, as any similar promotion organization in the entire State. The creator and moving force of this association is Mr. Ed. T. McGettigan who has made community building, trade-development and trade-protection a life study. Mr. McGettigan was born in Vallejo, California, March 3, 1875. Early in life he attended the “College of Hard Knocks,” obtaining his education in a life of practical experience, including in his curriculum, salesmanship, government clerkship; and finally taking up newspaper work, which he followed for twelve years. His newspaper experience covered a field ranging from San Francisco to Denver. The positions he is now filling are: Secretary-Manager of the Redwood City Chamber of Commerce, and General Manager of the Peninsula Industrial Commission, an organization formed for the purpose of making known, through widespread newspaper publicity, the merits of San Mateo County. In a little over two years, Mr. McGettigan’s articles on the good roads of San Mateo County have been published in magazines and papers in nearly every state in the Union as well as in Canada and Australia, being largely responsible for the recent development of the County during the last two years. Mr. McGettigan lives in Wellesley Park, Redwood City with his wife and four...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest