Location: Shoshone County ID

Political Secessionism And Crime

Before the mining period, commencing in 1862, Idaho was a comparatively unknown region belonging nominally to Oregon and afterward to Washington. During the years 1862-3 such was the rush of immigration to this section that Idaho was erected into a territory of the United States government. The enabling act to organize as such was passed by congress in the spring of the latter year, and on the 22d of September William H. Wallace, late delegate to congress from Washington, who had, on July l0th preceding, been appointed governor of Idaho by President Lincoln, issued his proclamation for organizing the territory, with the capital at Lewiston; but the fact of this proclamation was scarcely known to the miners in the wilderness, far removed from mail facilities, until the following spring. Meanwhile the laws of Washington were in force. The first occurrence of the name Idaho territory in the public records seems to have been under date of August 7, 1863, in Boise. James Judge was on that day made assessor. Previously to his election as delegate Wallace had districted the territory, for judicial purposes, as follows: First district, Nez Percé and Shoshone counties, A. C. Smith judge; second, Boise county, Samuel C. Parks judge; third, Missoula county and the country east of the Rocky mountains, Sidney Edgerton judge. Florence, Bannack City and Hellgate were appointed as the seats of federal...

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The First Settlements the March of Progress

The first settlements made by whites with-in the present boundaries of Idaho were effected by Jesuit missionaries, as is true throughout the Pacific coast region; and previously to 1863, the beginning of a new era in this region, there were but two or three settlements made by others. In the primeval stage the country was not at all inviting to civilized people. The almost omnipresence of red savages precluded all thoughts of prospecting in the mountains for valuable minerals, while the valleys seemed to be only arid deserts absolutely irreclaimable for agricultural purposes. In the outside world ideas as to the climate were de-rived only from hunters and trappers, who spent only the winters here, in the mountains, where the cold was intense and snow abundant, and from emigrants, who passed through here only during hot weather, when the valleys they traversed seemed to deserve connection with what was known as “the Great American desert.” One authority states that the first permanent settlement in Idaho was made at Mount Idaho, the present County seat of Idaho County. Probably the first permanent settlement, however, was made in 1834 in which year Nathaniel J. Wyeth, with a party of sixty men, started across the continent and established Fort Hall as a trading post near Snake River. This fort was the most important point between the Missouri River and Salt Lake to...

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The Hecla Group

The Hecla mine is located at Burke, Shoshone County (Lalande mining district). The original claims comprising the Hecla group were the Hecla and Katie May lode claims, located by James Toner on May 5, 1885. The property was purchased by the Hecla Mining Company, a corporation of Idaho, the principal stockholders being A. B. Campbell, John A. Finch, Patrick Clark, Simon Haley and a party of Milwaukee gentlemen. Up to January 1 , 1898, the Hecla shipped thirteen thousand dollars’ worth of lead-silver ore while the development work was progressing. This ore was taken out partly by the company and partly by leasers. During the spring and summer of 1898 the Hecla Mining Company of Washington was organized, with a capital of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, one million shares of the par value of twenty-five cents each, the officers being: A. B. Campbell, president; John A. Finch, vice-president; and H. R. Allen, secretary and treasurer The new company purchased the Hecla and Katie May claims from the old Hecla company, and also purchased the Or-No-Go fraction lode from James Doherty, M. Maher and John Stack. A bond was taken on the Orphan Boy, Orphan Girl, Leadville, Denver, Climax and Sylvanite, from John H. Van Dorn, which was subsequently taken up by the company. Later on the company purchased the Muscatine and Burlington claims from J. H. Van...

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The Standard Group Of Mineral Claims

The Standard group of claims consists of the following patented lode claims: Standard, Banner, Snow Line, Sancho, Sandwich, Youngstown, Sullivan Fraction, Banner Fraction, Parallel, Little Chap, Mammoth Fraction, a portion of the Mammoth, and Tariff, also the Columbia, Crown Point and Tom Reed, all located in the Coeur d’Alene silver-lead mineral belt, Lalande mining district, Shoshone county, Idaho, one mile from Burke, also the Union Mill-site located at Wallace, Idaho, together with water rights and flumes from which is developed about three hundred horse-power. The Standard claim was located May 7, 1885, by Timothy McCarthy, Timothy Hynes. Frank Hanson and John H. Simmons. All the claims in the Standard group are patented, the patents having issued direct to the Standard Mining Company, with the exception of the Mammoth, Tariff and Mammoth Fraction. These claims are patented, but the patent issued direct to the original owners and was afterward transferred to the Standard Mining Company. The Standard Mining Company is a corporation of Idaho. Its capital stock is five hundred thousand dollars, divided into five hundred thousand shares of the par value of one dollar each. The officers of the company are as follows: Amasa B. Campbell, president; John A. Finch, vice-president and treasurer; W. E. Finch, secretary. The stock is held principally by the Finch & Campbell Syndicate of Youngstown, Ohio, Chicago and Milwaukee. The property was purchased by...

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The Lead Belt Of The Coeur d’Alenes

Lead was first discovered in the Coeur d’Alene mining district, in northern Idaho, on Canyon creek in the fall of 1884, the discovery at that time being the Tiger mine, situated at the town of Burke. During same year a few other locations were made on Canyon creek, a few at Mullan, and in the fall of 1885 the Bunker Hill & Sullivan mines were discovered at Wardner. At the time these discoveries were made the country was inaccessible, with no railroads, wagon roads or trails, and the only way of getting in was by foot; ten to fifteen miles’ travel per day was about all the distance a prospector could cover, owing to the heavy underbrush and timber at that time. The prospector of that day who has not kept posted with the progress of the Coeur d’Alenes would hardly be able to recognize the country at this time. The camp at present may be divided into four districts, viz.: Canyon Creek, Wardner, Mullan and Nine Mile, and standing in the importance of output in the order named. The veins in the Canyon creek district are true fissure veins and as such are likely to go to great depth, some of them having already reached a depth of one thousand feet to one thousand two hundred feet, with no signs of any decrease in quality or quantity of...

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The Coeur d’Alene Mining District

This article, as well as that following, concerning the lead belt of the district, is contributed by F. R. Culbertson, under date of July 9. 1898: The Coeur d’Alene mineral belt of northern Idaho, in area about twenty miles square, first came into prominence as a gold-placer camp in the summer and fall of 1883. Placer gold was first discovered on Pritchard creek, near Eagle City, now a deserted camp in Shoshone County. Fabulous reports of the richness and extent of this gold soon spread and attracted the attention of the outside world. In the spring of 1884 there was quite a stampede into the Coeur d’Alene district, being somewhat similar to the present excitement over Klondike. Prospectors for the Coeur d’Alenes from the west outfitted at Spokane and proceeded thence by rail to Rathdrum, by stage to Coeur d’Alene city and from this point on by the old Mullan road (built by the government as a military road) to Evolution, about twenty miles above the Mission; and from this point on by trail to Eagle City. Prospectors from the east left the main line of the Northern Pacific at Herron and Trout Creek and continued from there by trail into the mines. The stories told by the old prospectors of the difficulties of get-ting into the country over these trails remind one of the description and accounts of...

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Labor Troubles In The Coeur d’Alene District

The following account of the recent labor troubles in the Coeur d’Alene mining district is contributed by H. H. Smith, of the Cincinnati Post, who, as a reporter of the Scripps-McRae League, was present on the scene and made careful investigation of the matter: The blowing up of the Bunker Hill and Sullivan mill at Wardner on April 29, 1899. entailing a financial loss of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and the murder of two men was the culminating act of violence in the ten-years war between labor and capital that has waged in the Coeur d’Alenes. In...

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1859 Petition for Bitterroot County, Montana

In the winter of 1859 a petition had been addressed to the legislature of Washington by the settlers of Bitterroot Valley and the Flathead agency, to have a county set off, to be called Bitterroot County. This petition had seventy-seven names attached, and chiefly these of the Mullan wagon-road company, who could hardly be called settlers, although a few names of actual pioneers are to be found among them. The petition does not appear to have been presented until the session of 1860-1, when two counties, called Shoshone and Missoula, were created out of the region east of the later boundary of Washington, the 117th meridian. The list is as follows: W. W. Johnson J. A. Mullan G. C. Taliaferro J. Sohon C. R. Howard James S. Townsend Theodore Kolccki W. W. De Lacy George H. Smith Cyrus Spengler A. J. Horton William Lowery A. E. D’Course J. Cashman William Plug Charles J. Clark Daniel F. Smith Robert P. Booth David Carroll James Conlan Isaac H. Rocap Frederick Sheridan W. L. Wheelock John C. Davis Thomas Hudson W. Burch D. Hays John Carr George Ruddock Patrick Graham Canhope Larard John Larard Joseph Tracy William O’Neil Patrick Mihan James N. Heron Edward Scully M. McLaughlin William Craig William Hickman J. C. Sawyer A. J. Batchelder A. L. Riddle James McMahon William Galigher L. Neis Zib. Teberlare George Young John Owens...

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Biography of Edward H. Moffitt

Edward H. Moffitt, secretary and treasurer of the Coeur d’Alene Hardware Company, of Wallace, Idaho, is numbered among the native sons of the Keystone state, his birth having occurred in Allegheny City, August 22, 1845. His parents were Rev. Thomas and Maria L. (Patterson) Moffitt. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1818, and for many years devoted his energies to the work of the ministry in connection with the Methodist Episcopal church. His death occurred in 1878, when he had reached the age of sixty years. His wife, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1818, is now a resident of Canon City, Colorado. The family resided in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, until 1857, when they removed to central Illinois, where they remained until 1870, the year of their removal to Kansas. It was in the latter state that the father died, and since 1881 the mother has made her home in Colorado. Mr. Moffitt, whose name introduces this review, acquired his education in the public schools of Pennsylvania and Illinois, and in January, 1864, when eighteen years of age, loyally offered his services to the government as a defender of the Union, and was assigned to Company F, Second Illinois Cavalry. He served until January 1866, and was mustered out at San Antonio, Texas, for the war had ended and his aid was no longer needed. Returning to his...

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Biography of Walter Allen Jones

This gentleman is the senior member of the law firm of Jones & Morphy, of Wallace, and holds a position of distinctive precedence at the bar of northern Idaho, by reason of his eminent ability as counsel and advocate. He was born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1855, and is a son of Joseph D. and Catherine A. (Kaercher) Jones, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania and spent their entire lives in that state, as had their ancestors since early colonial days. The father died at the age of forty-five years, and the mother was called to her final rest when seventy-three years of age. The subject of this review was reared and educated in the common schools of Pottsville and further continued his studies in the Paschal Institute, at that place. Determining to prepare for the bar, he began familiarizing himself with the principles of jurisprudence in 1874, as a student in the law office of the Hon. W. H. M. Oram, of Shamokin, Pennsylvania. He was admitted to the bar at Sunsbury, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1878, and immediately afterward began practice, spending one year in Mount Carmel, and then removing to Shamokin, where he practiced from 1879 until the close of the year 1885. In January 1886, he came to the Coeur d’Alene country and took up his abode in Murray, Shoshone County, where through the...

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Biography of Robert E. McFarland

Robert E. McFarland, late incumbent of the responsible position of attorney general of Idaho, by his faithful and capable discharge of duty won the highest commendation. Thoroughly versed in the principles of jurisprudence, he was well fitted to handle the intricate problems which presented themselves for solution, and his success affords the best evidence of his capabilities. He is a native of Missouri, born in Independence, November 21, 1857. The family is of Scotch lineage, the first American ancestors having crossed the Atlantic in colonial days and actively participated in the events which form the history of that epoch. They also battled for the freedom of the nation in the war of the Revolution. The father of our subject Rev. W. B. McFarland was born in Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Virginia, and later to Missouri. He married Miss Elvira Early, a sister of General Jubal Early, and at the age of sixty-five she departed this life. Rev. W. B. McFarland now resides in Iowa and has attained the advanced age of seven-ty-nine. He has led a long and useful life in the Methodist ministry, and is now practically retired, although he still preaches occasionally. One of a family of nine children, Robert Early McFarland was reared in a cultured home and acquired his education in Central College, at Fayette, Howard county, Missouri. He began reading law in Pettis...

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Biography of Caleb S. Stone, M. D.

Dr. Stone has left the ranks of the many to stand among the more successful few in a profession where advancement depends solely upon individual merit. In other walks of life, especially in commercial circles, one may enter upon a business already established and carry it on from the point where others laid it down, but the physician must rely solely upon his knowledge and ability, and these must be acquired through close and earnest application. That Dr. Stone, of Wallace, is numbered among the leading physicians and surgeons of his section of the state is therefore evidence of his power in his chosen calling. A native of Missouri, he was born May 10, 1859, his parents being Robert Harris and Eliza (Rodes) Stone, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, and are now deceased. The father died in Missouri, in 1881, at the age of sixty-five years, and the mother in Texas, when about thirty-five years of age. Mr. Stone engaged in merchandising throughout his business career. The Doctor obtained his preliminary education in the common schools of his native state, and supplemented it by study in an academy for boys at Little Rock, Arkansas, and in Woodlawn Seminary, at St. Charles, Missouri. He began the study of medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, at the age of seventeen years, and in 1879 he went to Leadville, Colorado, where he...

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Biography of William W. Woods

Idaho is fortunate in having an able bar. The importance of the legal business growing out of mining enterprises early drew to the state lawyers of ability and experience in large affairs and litigation involving big sums and values. As a result, there is at every important business center of the state legal talent which would do credit to Chicago or New York. Major William W. Woods, one of the leading lawyers of Idaho, was born in Burlington, Iowa, January 24, 1841, a son of James W. and Catharine (Wells) Woods. His father was a successful lawyer, and was born in New Hampshire in 1810, settled in Iowa in 1836 and died at Waverly, Iowa, in 1880. His mother was born in New York in 1825 and died at Burlington, Iowa, in 1864. Major Woods received an academical education at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and at nineteen began the study of law in the office and under the preceptorship of J. C. & B. J. Hall, of Burlington, Iowa. He was called from his legal studies by the demand for soldiers to protect our national interests in the civil war, and in August, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company L, Fourth Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, with which he served until September 1865, when he was mustered out, with the rank of major, after having made an admirable record as a...

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Biography of Peter J. Holohan

The gentleman whose name appears above claims distinction as having been one of the first settlers at Wallace, Idaho, and as a member of the firm of Holohan & McKinlay, dealers in tobacco and cigars, he is recognized as one of the prominent business men of that city. He is a native of Hardin county, Kentucky, and is a son of Michael and Ann (Welsh) Holohan, natives of Ireland, who came early in life to the United States and met and married here, settling in Kentucky about 1850. Michael Holohan died in Idaho, in 1880, aged about fifty years, and his widow, now about sixty-two years old, is living at Wallace. They had eight children, of whom six are now living, and of whom Peter J. Holohan was the second in order of nativity. At nine years of age Peter J. Holohan accompanied his parents and brothers and sisters from Kentucky to Iowa, where the family lived until 1878. He then went to Oregon, but remained only a short time before settling with his father’s family on Camas prairie, in Idaho (now in Idaho county), where he lived until 1885, five years after his father’s death, and then came to Wallace, where he was one of the first settlers. Mr. Holohan’s first enterprise after taking up his residence at Wallace was in packing merchandise to the various mining camps...

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Biography of William F. Herrington

The medical profession would seem to afford a better business training than any other of the learned professions. At least, of the lawyers and clergymen who turn their attention to the business very many of them fail. Very few physicians do, and in almost any community the successful physician develops, without apparent effort, into the successful man of affairs. One of the many medical men who are making noteworthy careers as businessmen is the gentleman whose name is the title of this article. Dr. William F. Herrington was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, September 12, 1861, a son of S. G. and Jane (Beeler) Herrington. His father was born in Missouri also, in 1841, and is now a well-to-do farmer in the southern part of that state. His mother, a native of Tennessee, died in Missouri, when only twenty-four years of age. After gaining a practical education in the public schools of Salem, Missouri, and spending several years in business pursuits, young Herrington began the study of medicine, at the age of twenty-four, under the preceptorship of Dr. L. B. Laws, of Houston, Missouri. Later he took a course of professional lectures at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was graduated in 1889 from the American Medical College, of St. Louis, Missouri, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He practiced his profession one year in Missouri and one year in the...

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