Location: Scott County KY

Biography of Hon. Robert P. Henry

The son of a Revolutionary soldier and the representative of a distinguished family was Robert P. Henry. He was born in 1788 in Scott County, Ky., where his father, Gen. William Henry, had settled among the first in that region. He graduated in Transylvania University at Lexington, and studied law with Henry Clay. In 1809 he was admitted to the bar, and the same year was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney for the district. He served in the war of 1812 as aid to his father, with the rank of Major. In 1811 he married Miss Gabriella F. Pitts, of Georgetown, Ky., and some years after the close of the war of 1812 he removed to Christian County, where he continued to reside to the end of his life. Soon after he came to Hopkinsville he was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney, a position he filled with ability. He was elected to Congress from this district in 1823, and re-elected in 1825. As a member of the Committee on “Roads and Canals ” was instrumental in obtaining the first appropriation ever granted for the improvement of the Mississippi River. While in Congress he was appointed a Judge of the Court of Appeals, an honor he declined. He died suddenly before the close of his second congressional term, and before he had hardly reached the prime of life. As a lawyer, Mr. Henry was...

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Biography of Gov. John M. Palmer

John M. Palmer was born in Scott County, Kentucky, September 13, 1817, and soon after his birth his father, who had been a soldier in the war of 1812, removed to Christian County, where lands were then cheap. John M. is still remembered by many of the old citizens as a bright, intelligent boy, fond of reading, and who lost no opportunity to improve his mind. He received such education as the new and sparsely settled country afforded, and in 1831 his father removed to Illinois. Shortly after a college was opened at Alton on the “manual labor system,”...

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Slave Narrative of Parthena Rollins

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Parthena Rollins Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Scott County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1853 Place of Residence: 848 Camp Street (Rear) Federal writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. PARTHENA ROLLINS 848 Camp Street (Rear) Mrs. Parthena Rollins was born in Scott County, Kentucky, in 1853, a slave of Ed Duvalle, who was always very kind to all of his slaves, never whipping any of the adults, but often whipped the children to correct them, never beating them. They all had to work, but never overwork, and always had plenty to eat. She remembers so many slaves, who were not as fortunate as they were. Once when the “nigger traders” came through, there was a girl, the mother of a young baby; the traders wanted the girl, but would not buy her because she had the child. Her owner took her away, took the baby from her, and beat it to death right before the mother’s eyes, then brought the girl back to the sale without the baby, and she was bought immediately. Her new master was so pleased to get such a strong girl who could work so well and so fast. The thoughts of the cruel way of putting her baby to death preyed on her mind to such an extent, she developed...

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Slave Narrative of Aunt Harriet Mason

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Harriet Mason Location: Lancaster, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County KY Date of Birth: April 14, 1847 Garrard County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Eliza Ison) [HW: Ky 11] Aunt Harriet Mason-Ex-Slave: She was born one mile below Bryantsville on the Lexington Pike in Garrard County, and was owned by B.M. Jones. She gives the date of her birth as April 14, 1847. Aunt Harriet’s father was Daniel Scott, a slave out of Mote Scott’s slave family. Aunt Harriet’s mother’s name was Amy Jones, slave of Marse Briar Jones, who came from Harrodsburg, Ky. The names of her brothers were Harrison, Daniel, Merida, and Ned; her sisters were Susie and Maria. Miss Patsy, wife of Marse Briar gave Maria to Marse Sammy Welsh, brother of Miss Patsy’s and who lived with his sister. He taught school in Bryantsville for a long time. “General Gano who married Jane Welsh, adopted daughter of Marse Briar Jones, took my sisters Myra and Emma, Brother Ned and myself to Tarrant County, Texas to a town called Lick Skillet, to live. Grapevine was the name of the white folks house. It was called Grapevine because these grapevines twined around the house and arbors. Sister Emma was the cook and Myra and me were nurse and house maids. Brother married Betty Estill, a slave who cooked for the Estill family. Mr. Estill later...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas J. Vanderslice

Thomas J. Vanderslice, a prominent figure in the earlier affairs of the Great Nemaha Indian Agency, a public man of the territory and state, was a native of Scott County, Kentucky, born in 1827. He enlisted from his native state as a soldier for the Mexican war, but never saw service. In 1853 he came to Kansas and stopped at the Great Nemaha Agency, where his father, Maj. Daniel Vanderslice, had just assumed the agency there of the Iowas, Sacs, Foxes and Kickapoos, and from 1854 to 1856 served as farmer and miller for the Sacs and Foxes, He was elected to the Territorial Legislature of 1860 and to the State Legislature of 1868, and served two terms as sheriff of Doniphan County, beginning 1874 and 1876. During the Civil war he belonged to the state troops who repelled Sterling Price in his threatened raid against Kansas City. Shortly before his death he moved to Oklahoma, dying at Perry March 18,...

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Biography of Joel B. Harper

History has long since placed on its pages the names of those who, coming to the Atlantic coast, planted colonies in the New World and opened up that section of the country to civilization. As the years passed, and the population of that region rapidly increased, brave pioneers made their way into the wild districts farther west. The names of Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton were enduringly inscribed upon the records of Kentucky, that of John Jacob Astor upon the history of Michigan and other states of the upper Mississippi valley. Later Kit Carson and John C. Fremont made their way into the mountainous districts west of the “father of waters’ and subsequently the explorers penetrated into the vast wildnesses of the Pacific slope. The development of the northwest, however, is comparatively recent, but when time shall have made the era of progress here a part of the history of the past, the names of men no less brave and resolute than those who came to the shores of New England or made their way into the Mississippi valley will be found illuminating the annals of this section of the Union, and on the list will be found that of Joel Beauford Harper, who is numbered among the early settlers of both California and Idaho. Mr. Harper was born in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky, October 15, 1837. His father,...

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Biography of Isaac Roberts

Isaac Roberts, retired farmer and blacksmith; P. O. Charleston; born in Bourbon Co., Ky., Feb. 25, 1807; his grandfather emigrated from Wales in the early part of the seventeenth century, and located in Virginia, then to Kentucky, where he died; his father, Azariah Roberts, was born in Kentucky about the year 1775, and died in Indiana about 1847. The subject of this sketch removed to Scott Co., Ky., when quite young, where he lived until 22 years of age, and learned and worked at the blacksmith trade until 1828, when he removed to Hendricks Co., Ind., and followed his trade until 1852, during a period of twenty-four years; he then emigrated to Illinois, and located upon his present place in June, 1853, where he has since continued to live; he first purchased 120 acres of land upon his present farm, to which he has since added until he has 360 acres, which he has accumulated by his own hard labor, energy and industry. He married in April, 1822, to Nancy Bowles; she was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., in November, 1807; she died Feb. 28, 1866; nine children were the fruit of this union, five of whom are deceased; the names of the living are William D., born April 29, 1829; Aratus, born Oct. 20, 1833; Isaac M., born June 16, 1847, and Alpheus, born Feb. 24, 1850; Mr....

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Biographical Sketch of John Craig White

John Craig White, farmer and blacksmith, Sec. 15; P. O. Campbell; owns 120 acres; was born in Scott Co., Ky., Dec. 5, 1830, and lived with his parents on the farm until 19 years of age. He was married to Louisa Beckum Feb. 25, 1855; she was born in Coles Co., Ill., Feb. 25, 1836; died Aug. 10, 1859; he then married Sarah Elizabeth Kemper May 8, 1862; she was born in Fayette Co., Ky., Jan. 10, 1833, and has had eight children, viz., John I., Katie, Edward and Coleman; deceased-Ida F., Charles, George O., Sarah A. Mr. and Mrs. White’s parents are natives of...

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Scott County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Scott County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Scott County USGenWeb Archives Project Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Scott County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Scott County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Scott County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Census Index Transcribers Notes Census (File 1 Of 2) Census (File 2 Of 2) Census (File 2 Of 2) Hosted at RootsWeb Census Index Census Notes Census Transcription (File 1 of 2) Census Transcription (File 2 of 2) Census Transcription (File 2 of 2) Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Scott County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Scott County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Scott County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Scott County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Scott County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Scott County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1830...

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Biography of Philemon L. Mitchell

In recalling to mind those men who in an early day laid the foundation of Rock Island’s present commercial and financial stability, one’s memory instinctively turns to an individual who, during his lifetime, was instrumental in organizing and conducting one of the largest banking houses in Rock Island County, and who was a tower of moral and financial strength in the community, Philemon L. Mitchell, deceased. He was born October 16, 1812, at Limington, Maine, and died at his home in Rock Island January 23, 1895. His parents were Isaac and Martha (Libby) Mitchell. The father was a native of Maine and the mother of Ire-land, she having come to America with her parents in her early childhood. To this couple seven children were born, four sons and three daughters. The parents spent their lives in the City of Limington, where their family was born and reared, the father dying in that city January 26, 1853, at the age of eighty-two years. The death of the mother occurred in the same city January 3, 1877, she having attained the extreme age of ninety-four years. Philemon L. Mitchell spent his early boy-hood in Limington, his school days being limited to a short attendance in that city’s public schools. But his education was not in any sense a limited one on that account, for he was throughout his life a student...

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Biographical Sketch of George F. Hackett

George F. Hackett, farmer, S. 18; P. O. Oakland; born in Scott Co., Ky., Aug. 27, 1827; he emigrated with his parents, in the fall of 1834, to Illinois, and located in Coles Co., where he attended school during the winter, and assisted his father farming during the summer, until 18 years of age, when he worked by the month during the summer driving cattle from Coles Co. to Wisconsin, and attending school during the winter for four years; in 1850, he drove an ox-team, overland, to California, going via the old Oregon route, by Fort Hall, arriving in Wearville, Aug. 26, of the same year, being on £the road six months and twelve days, leaving St. Joe, Mo., May 14; he traveled 2,200 miles without seeing a house or habitation, save three forts, which were occupied by United States soldiers; he then went directly to the mines, where he followed mining, meeting with fair success, for two and a half years; when he came home, by steamer. via New York, arriving at Oakland, April 16, 1853, having been gone for upward of three years; he then engaged in farming five miles from Oakland, which he followed until 1858, when he purchased his present place, where he has since lived for a period of upward of twenty years. He married March 9, 1854, to Edna Pemberton; she was born...

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