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Location: Saskatchewan Canada

Houses of the Assiniboin Tribe

The Assiniboin were, until comparatively recent times, a part of the Yanktonai, from whom they may have separated while living in the forest region of the northern section of the present State of Minnesota. Leaving the parent stock, they joined the Cree, then living to the northward, with whom they remained in close alliance. Gradually they moved to the valleys of the Saskatchewan and Assiniboin Rivers and here were encountered by Alexander Henry in 1775. Interesting though brief notes on the structures of the Assiniboin as they appeared in 1775 and 1776 are contained in the narrative of Henry’s...

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Houses of the Blackfoot Confederacy

The tribes forming this group are the Siksika, or Blackfeet proper, the Piegan, and the Kainah, or Bloods. Closely allied and associated with these were the Atsina, a branch of the Arapaho, but who later became incorporated with the Assiniboin. These tribes roamed over a wide territory of mountains, plains, and valleys. Early accounts of the manners and ways of life of the Blackfeet are to be found in the journals kept by traders belonging to the Hudson’s Bay Company, who penetrated the vast, unknown wilderness southwestward from York Factory daring the eighteenth century. Although the records are all...

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Seymour, Violet Isabel Johnson – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Violet Isabel Johnson Seymour died May 29, 2007 in Enterprise. She was 76. Mrs. Seymour was born Sept. 5, 1930, to Elmer and Evelyn Johnson in Saskatchewan, Canada. She married Gail Seymour on Jan 1. 1950. She was a professional bowler with a league for seven years. She worked for Boeing Company in the 1970’s, in real estate and with the Boeing Employees Credit Union. She retired from the BECU in 1983. She was a member of the Alpine Golf Course, was active in the Women’s Golf Club Leadership and a member of Civil Air Patrol, attaining the rank of Lt. Col. in Seattle, Wash. He loved fishing, camping, golfing and watching kid’s sports, including football, basketball, and soccer. She was a member of the Enterprise Christian Church. She is survived by her son Jim Seymour; daughters Laura and Randy Lanfell of Hayden Lake, Idaho, Betty and Sonny Settergren of Enterprise and Sherry and Bill Campbell of Valleyford, Wash.; seven grandchildren and two great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents. Memorial services will be held at the Enterprise Christian Church on June 8 at 4:30 p.m. Fellowship and food will follow the service. Wallowa County Chieftain, June 7, 2007 Contributed by Dixie...

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Burnside, Emily L. Cerkonck Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Emily L. Burnside, 89, a long-time Baker City resident,died Oct. 21, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. Visitations will be from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Her graveside service will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Burnside was born Oct. 30, 1914, at Saskatchewan Providence, Canada, to Albin and Anna Cerkonck. The family moved from Canada to Fall City, Wash., when she was a young girl. She received her schooling there. She married Elmer Lloyd Burnside in 1935 at Yakima, Wash. They lived in several locations until settling at Richland working on a farm. In 1942, they moved to Halfway where they owned and operated a restaurant, bar and hotel, now known as Stockman’s. They divorced in 1946 and Mrs. Burnside moved with her children to Baker City where she had lived since. In Baker City, she took care of her children as well as many others as a certified foster parent for Children Services. She also ran a day care center for many years. She loved her family and taking care of children. She enjoyed cooking and always had a large garden. She will be very missed by her children and grandchildren who loved her very much. Survivors include her children, Deannie Burnside Wirth, and her husband, Wayne, of Spokane, Wash., Patricia...

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Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins, such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Sikisa proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with these are the Atsina and the Sarsi. Within the recent historic period, until gathered upon reservations, the Blackfeet held most of the immense territory stretching almost from North Saskatchewan River, Canada, to the southern head-streams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about longitude 105° to the base of the Rocky Mountains. A century earlier, or about 1790, they were found by Mackenzie occupying the upper and middle South Saskatchewan, with the...

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