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Location: Sangamon County IL

Biography of S. S. White

S.S. WHITE. – The pioneer experiences of Judge White are of an exceptionally interesting character. This well-known and highly valued citizen of Portland was born in Franklin county, Indiana, December 14, 1811. His father was much of a frontiersman, and, after a removal to Ohio in 1815, went three years later to Sangamon county, Illinois, settling on Sugar creek, twenty miles south of Springfield. This was then a remote and unoccupied region, Mr. White’s family and those of a Mr. Ellis and Mr. Vancil being the only families within the limits of the present Sangamon and Morgan counties, and sixty miles from white settlements. Various removals were made subsequently within that state. Upon arriving at his majority, young White entered the mercantile business, and continued in it near Galesburg. In 1831 occurred his marriage to Miss Hulda Jennings; and the next year an effort was made in company with Mr. Amzi Doolittle, and M.M. McCarver, so well known as one of our early citizens, to settle on a tract of land soon to be thrown open in consequence of a treaty of relinquishment from the Indians. The land was not to be subject to settlement until June of that year; but, not apprehending any opposition, these men located lands and put up cabins in February, but were removed with much rigor by government troops under Jefferson Davis, then a...

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Biographical Sketch of Merrill F. Hackett

Merrill F. Hackett, retired farmer; P. O. Oakland; born in Lexington, Fayette Co., Ky., Sept. 10, 1821; he removed with his parents, when 8 years of age, and located in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Ill., where he learned and worked at the trade of brickmason until 1841, at which time he removed to Charleston, Coles Co., and engaged at his trade and farming and stock-raising until 1856; he then removed to the northern part of Coles Co., where he followed farming and stock-raising until 1875, when he purchased his present place of about thirty acres, upon which he has a fine residence, and removed to Oakland, where he has since continued to live; he also owns 613 acres of land in Douglas Co., which he has rented. He married Jan. 22, 1867, Elizabeth J. Sargent; she was born in Coles Co., March 22, 1839; her parents were among the early pioneers of Coles Co., locating in 1830; they have four children by this union-Snowden S., Gennella C., Lora E. and Florence...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Curtis

Charles Curtis, farmer; P.0 Oakland; born in Oakland, Coles Co., Ill., Dec. 5, 1841; his father died when he was an infant, and he continued to live with his mother until her marriage with John Dollar, with whom he then lived until the spring of 1862, when he enlisted in the 63d I. V. I., and went forward to battle for the Union; he was in many severe battles, among which were the siege and capture of Vicksburg, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Atlanta, and was with Sherman’s army through Georgia, spending the Christmas of 1864 in Savannah; then north through South and North Carolina, being in many engagements, until the surrender of Johnston and his army, when he continued his march via Richmond to Washington, where, after the grand review of the army, he with his regiment went to Louisville, Ky., where he was mustered out of service, after which, he went to Springfield, where he received his discharge in July, 1865, having served upward of three years in the Union army; he then returned to Coles Co., Ill., and, in the spring of 1866, removed upon his present place, where he has since lived. He married April, 1864, to Martha I. Hannah; she was born in North Carolina in 1844, and died January, 1873, leaving three children now living, viz., James W., Lucinda E. and Roddie Ellsworth;...

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Biography of Charles Hedricks

In the death of this esteemed and worthy citizen Wallowa County suffered the loss of one of her best known and most widely beloved and substantial sons and his demise was a time of general mourning to all who knew him. Mr. Hedricks was capable and enterprising, and his real worth and noble qualities were manifest to all. Charles Hedricks was born on January 28, 1828, in West Virginia, to Charles and Hannah (Collins) Hedricks. The father was a native of West Virginia and was also a skilled machinist and he wrought for some time in the large iron works in Tennessee. While our subject was a very small child his parents brought him to Sangamon County, Illinois, where they settled on a farm. At the early age of seventeen Charles started in the battle of life for himself and, learning the carpenter trade, he assisted to erect the old fort Smith in Arkansas. When he had reached his twentieth year he had been enabled by careful savings to accumulate sufficient funds to purchase a farm, which he did in Platte County, Missouri, and there he remained for five years and then removed to Jefferson County, Kansas, being the first white settler in that county, where, also, he took up a pre-emption claim. For twenty-seven years he labored in this place, five of which were spent in the service...

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Biographical Sketch of Perce, William

Perce, William dealer in a general line of groceries, provisions and queensware, opened trade on October 4, 1880. He carries a stock of about $2,500. Came to Russell in 1874 and farmed five years. Was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1817, and raised as a farmer. Moved to Springfield, Ill., in 1849, and engaged in the manufacture of brooms a few years. He was City Marshal of Springfield for one year, and Captain of the Police in 1860-61. Enlisted as First Lieutenant in Company C, Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, in July 1861. Resigned the next May on account of ill-health, and re-enlisted again in 1862, in the Seventieth Illinois Volunteers, a three months’ regiment, and was elected Captain of Company B of this regiment. Served four months. Went to farming in 1863, and was appointed United States Deputy Marshal, under John Logan, in 1869, serving two years. Was also an operative of the Secret Service for the Southern District of Illinois. He was married in 1842 to Miss Roxana Vittium, a native of Ohio. They have five children – Mary, now married to Mr. S. Spindle; E. I., married to W. T. Shaw; Wm. A., married; Lewis A., married, and Clarinda A., now Mrs. J. F. Dollison. He has been Justice of the Peace in Russell for many...

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Biographical Sketch of Alfred A. Lowdermilk, M. D.

Dr. Lowdermilk is the son of William and Martha (Rhodes) Lowdermilk, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, June 24, 1848. In 1856, his parents moved to Sangamon county, Illinois, taking young Alfred with them. At fourteen years old, he started out to make his own living and learned the trade of tinsmith, which he followed till he was twenty-one years old. He then, in 1869, entered and took a course of lectures in the Louisville Medical College. The next year he began the practice in Vernon and Barton counties, this State, thus acquiring the means to complete his professional education. Returning to Louisville in 1875, he took a second course of medical lectures, graduating therefrom in 1876. Soon after this he began the practice in Illinois and continued till 1880, when he located at Bois D’Arc in this county, where he practiced actively till the fall of 1882. His failing health there necessitated his quitting active practice, and he opened a drug store, and has done only office practice since then. Dr. Lowdermilk has been a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge since he was twenty-one years old in which he has filled various offices. He is also a member of the Grand Lodge. February 13, 1866, he was married to Miss Lizzie Burton, of Scott county. She died April 13, 1870, leaving two children—Martin and...

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Biography of Gen. Smith D. Atkins

Smith D. Atkins, who is a lawyer, soldier, journalist and politician, was born on the 9th of June, 1836, near Elmira, Chemung Co., N. Y.; he came with his father’s family to Illinois in 1848, and lived on a farm until 1850. He then became an apprentice in the office of the Prairie Democrat, which was the first paper published in Freeport. He was educated at Rock River Seminary, Mt. Morris, Ill., working in the printing-office and studying during his spare hours, and in 1852 obtained the foremanship of the Mt. Morris Gazette, while he was yet a student in the seminary. In 1853 he became associated with C. C. Allen, who, during the war, was a Major on the staff of Maj. Gen. Schofield; they bought this paper and established the Register at Savanna, Carroll County. In the fall of the same year he entered the office of Hiram Bright, in Freeport, as a student of law, and was admitted to practice June 27, 1855. After his admission he continued to read law for some time in the office of Goodrich & Scoville, of Chicago, Ill., and then entered upon his practice in Freeport, dating his entry into the active duties of his profession Sept. 1, 1856. In 1860 Mr. Atkins made a spirited canvass for the election of Lincoln to the Presidency and one address of his...

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