Location: Sandusky Ohio

Huron Tribe

Commonly known as the Huron Tribe, Huron Indians, Huron People, Huron First Nation, Wyandot Tribe, and Wyandot Indians (Huron – lexically from French huré, bristly,’ ‘bristled,’ from hure, rough hair’ (of the head), head of man or beast, wild boar’s head; old French, ‘muzzle of the wolf, lion,’ etc., ‘the scalp,’ ‘a wig’; Norman French, huré, ‘rugged’; Roumanian, hurée, ‘rough earth,’ and the suffix –on, expressive of depreciation and employed to form nouns referring to persons). The name Huron, frequently with an added epithet, like vilain, ‘base,’ was in use in France as early as 1358 1La Curne deSainte-Palaye...

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Biography of Hon. Edwin N. Cooke

HON. EDWIN N. COOKE. – The subject of this sketch is a lineal descendant of the Puritans, who came to America in the ship Mayflower, and landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, December 21, 1620. Among the passengers of that historical band were Francisco Cook and his son, John Cooke, who settled and the families of whom for many generations lived in that and other colonies, up to the time of the Revolutionary war. At the commencement of the Revolutionary war, Mr. Cooke’s great-grandfather, Asaph Cooke lived near Boston, Massachusetts, and had four sons who espoused the American cause and enlisted in the patriotic army, and remained there until the termination of the war, seven years afterward, serving with distinction, and afterwards marrying and rearing large families. The subject of our sketch has seen three of them when very old men, and heard them recount the story of the struggle over and over again. The grandfather of Mr. Cooke, after the Revolution, married Thankful Parker, and settled in Granville, Washington county, New York. He reared a family of four sons and one daughter. The eldest son, Asaph, was the father of E.N. Cooke, who married Mary Stewart in 1805, and had one son and one daughter born to them, when he moved in 1808 to Jefferson county of the same state, where Edwin N. Cooke was born, February 26, 1810, near...

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Biography of Mrs. Eliza Cooke

MRS. ELIZA COOKE. – All who are acquainted with the estimable lady whose name heads this brief résumé of her life well known that the best eulogy that can be written only illustrates how impossible it is to bear fitting portrayal of the genuine worth of so good and noble a woman. Grandma Cooke has ever been known in her intercourse with others to be generous and unselfish in the highest degree, one of the gentlest of mothers, the most patient of wives, an affectionate friend, and the kindest of neighbors. Whether meeting with trials incident to a long, tedious and dangerous journey across the plains, enduring the privations of pioneer life, or surrounded thereafter, as she has been, with a competence of life’s comforts, the tenor of her life has run in the same channel, ever manifesting to all about her those qualities which make the good, true woman akin to the angels. She was born in Rensselaer county, New York April 29, 1816. In early Rensselaer county, New York, April 29, 1816. In early life her parents removed to Ohio and located in Erie county. On September 5, 1835, she was married to Edwin N. Cooke, at Oxford, in that state. For a number of years they resided at Sandusky City, when they removed to Fremont, where they remained until their departure for Oregon in the fall...

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Biography of A. N. Bain

A. N. Bain, proprietor of the Charleston Foundry, Charleston; was born in Erie Co., Ohio, April 3, 1828; his father was a ship-carpenter, with a family of nine children; at the age of 14, Mr. Bain began working on a farm, which he continued until the spring of 1845, when he entered the Mad River & Lake Erie Railroad shop at Sandusky, Ohio, as an apprentice, remaining there until 1852, and thoroughly mastering the machinist’s trade. He then went to New Albany, Ind., where he was married, Feb. 3, 1853, to Miss Catharine Caldwell, of that city, who was born in Appomattox Co., Va., Feb. 8, 1832. While in New Albany, he worked as a mechanic in the shops of the New Albany & Salem Railroad; in April, 1853, he removed to Terre Haute, Ind., and entered the foundry of Grover & Madison, and remained in their employ until April 1, 1857; he then came to Charleston, and, with his brother, William Bain, and George 0. Carr, erected a small building, 25×50 feet in size; Mr. Carr soon retired from the firm; they ran a general repair foundry till 1863, when they made their first stove, and enlarged their buildings, which now cover four town lots, while their trade extends from Indianapolis on the east, to the Rocky Mountains on the west; in 1869, Mr. Bain engaged in the...

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