Location: San Francisco County CA

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Herbert Seth Anderton

One of the most successful physicians and surgeons on the peninsula is Dr. Herbert S. Anderton of Burlingame, who although only established in this county two years, has a large and growing practice. Dr. Anderton was located in San Francisco when he saw the field of opportunities that waited at the door of the metropolis and quickly recognized this county as the land of advancement. After finishing medical school Dr. Anderton specialized on different subjects in several large eastern institutions. He then studied at the Marine Hospital in San Francisco and later was a surgeon in the emergency service in San Francisco. Dr Anderton is one of the directors of the Burlingame Commercial Club and one of the leading spirits of that organization. He has unbounded faith in the future of Burlingame and the peninsula and has made investments in Burlingame property. Dr. Herbert Seth Anderton was born in Virginia on September 29, 1885 and has been a resident of California for five years. Dr. Anderton belongs to the Burlingame lodge of...

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Biographical Sketch of Horace W. Amphlett

Brilliant futures are In store for some of San Mateo county’s young men. Among these is H. W. Amphlett, formerly assistant postmaster of San Mateo and amateur playwright. Famed not only for his literary talents but admired for his sterling character, rare personality and keen ability, Horace Amphlett easily takes a place among the best liked young men on the peninsula. After acquiring his early education in the San Francisco schools, Mr. Amphlett continued his studies in San Mateo graduating from the local high school in 1908. He immediately went Into the postoffice and in only two years he worked up to the position of assistant postmaster. He has served in this capacity for the past five years. Mr. Amphlett resigned his position in February to fill the position of assistant cashier of the National Bank of San Mateo, where he will no doubt become a fixture. In the literary world Mr. Amphlett has brought himself into fame. His sketches and small playlets have been produced locally by the Peninsula Club, the Elks and the Catholic Club. Some were of sufficient merit to interest big eastern producers who sent to Mr. Amphlett for his manuscripts. The best known are “Thru Green Eyes,” “Tess of the Tennement,” “The Misogynist,” “The First Stone” and “The Roof Garden,” all of which are copyrighted. Mr. Amphlett is one of the organizers and is...

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Biography of Hon. Charles Eisebeis

This wealthy resident of Port of Washington gained his eminence by sturdy industry and sagacious investment during the pioneer days. He is a native of Prussia, was born in 1832, and the fifth in a family of ten children. Of his father he learned the trade of a baker, and was prepared upon his arrival in America in 1856 to earn thereby, in company with his brother, an independent livelihood at Rochester, New York. In 1858 he came via Panama to San Francisco, and in the fall of the same year arrived at Port Townsend. He here opened a shop and prepared for the market the first baker’s goods in the town, and probably the first in the territory, except at Vancouver. He was under engagement with the firm of Priest & Peterson, becoming a partner within a few months. The site was the same as that now occupied by his present fine building. Two years later he removed to Steilacoom, and after a sojourn of five years at this point, during which he engaged successfully in his former business and in brewing, returned to the city of his first choice, continuing a remunerative management of his shop, and investing his saving in real estate. by this means he has acquired some of the finest property in the city, and at Seattle has been very successful in that line....

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Biography of Hon. Wilder W. Parker

HON. W.W. PARKER – There is no name in the city at the mouth of the Columbia better known in the business and social circles than that of Parker; and of those bearing it Wilder W. Parker wields an influence perhaps the most extended. A pioneer not only in name but also in fact, he ha brought to bear upon public affairs a mind keen, quick and powerful, and has been able to give the people the benefit of opinions carefully elaborated and lucidly stated, and held by himself with conscientious firmness. In intellect and character he is the ideal New Englander, and has found his life interest in the great political and moral development of the nation. He was born at Orange, Vermont, October 19, 1824, but removed as a child to Washington in the same state; and that town became his own until he attained his majority. Being ambitious and fond of study, he sought an education in advance of that afforded at the common schools; and for this purpose selected Newberry Seminary, an institution under the control of the Methodist denomination and deemed at the time the best equipped in Vermont. Assisting himself by teaching school in the winters, he graduated from the academic department of that seminary, and completed his course at Norwich University, an institution which had grown out of the military school of...

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Biography of Charles Wood Davis

A significantly varied, distinguished and interesting career was that of the late Charles Wood Davis, and fortunate it was for the State of Kansas that he early established his residence within its borders, for his splendid initiative and executive powers came most effectively into play in the furtherance of the eivic, industrial and general material development and progress of this commonwealth. He was one of the famous argonauts of the year 1849 in California, was long and prominently identified with railway interests, was a recognized authority in all matters pertaining to the basic industry of agriculture, was a pioneer in the exploiting of the coal-mining industry in Kansas, and there seemed to be no bounds set about his constructive energy and broad-minded public spirit. By very reason of his two personal names he became widely known and highly honored throughout the Middle West by the sobriquet of “Cotton Wood Davis.” He was one of the venerable and honored pioneer citizens of Sedgwick County, Kansas, at the time of his death, and it is signally fitting that in this history of the state and its people be entered a tribute to the memory of this strong, resourceful and noble man. Charles Wood Davis was born at South Dartmouth, Massachusetts, on the 17th of April, 1832, and was a scion of the staunchest of colonial stock in New England, where his...

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Biographical Sketch of Abel C. Wilder

Abel C. Wilder, prominent in the free-soil movements of Kansas Territory, in the establishment of the republican party within its limits and the founding of the commonwealth, was born at Mendon, Massachusetts, March 18, 1828. With little book learning, he early became identified with business at Rochester, New York, and did much to found its public library. While still a resident of the East, the Kansas question enlisted his deep interest and sympathy, and he came to the territory at his first opportunity in March, 1857. Engaging in the land business at Leavenworth, he at once became prominent in that line, as well as an earnest opponent of the Lecompton constitution. Mr. Wilder was a delegate to the Osawatomie convention of May, 1859; afterward became secretary of the first republican central committee, and chairman in 1860 and 1862. He served as chairman of the Kansas delegation to the national republican convention held at Chicago in 1860, being a strong supporter of Seward. President Lincoln appointed him a brigade commissary in August, 1861, with headquarters at Fort Scott. He was elected a member of the Thirty-eighth Congress in November, 1862, and declined a re-election in 1864. In the fall of 1865 he returned to Rochester, New York, and, with his brother, Daniel W. Wilder, engaged in the publication of the Evening Express. He was elected mayor of that city in...

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Biography of Henry Greve

Henry Greve, a member of Governor Hyde’s staff and one of the prominent business men of St. Louis, has made his home in this city since 1875 and through the intervening period his steady progress and advancement along business lines have brought him to a place of prominence and distinction, for he is now sole owner and president of the John Wahl Commission Company and is also a director of the LibertyCentral Trust Company. A native of Germany, he was born in Velen, Westphalia, on the 6th of March, 1856, his parents being Henry and Maria Anna (Brueggemann) Greve, who were also natives of Germany, where the father engaged extensively and successfully in dealing in live stock. Liberal educational advantages were accorded Henry Greve, who attended the public and high schools of his native country and afterward became a student in the university of Coesfeld in Westphalia. His liberal training constituted the foundation upon which has been built his later success. America, “the land of opportunity,” attracted him in 1873, and bidding adieu to friends and native country, he sailed for the new world, first taking up his abode in Dyersville, Iowa, where he initiated his business career by accepting a clerkship in a general store. He afterward removed to Quincy, Illinois, where he was again connected with mercantile interests and later resided for a time in Helena, Montana,...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert J. Shea

While the older members of the pioneer staff are retiring one by one, it is pleasant to note that there are younger men of courage and enterprise to take up the worthy labors of these estimable men, who opened this country for settlement, and to prosecute them with an untiring zeal and a sagacity that is sure to win in the battle of life. Among this wide awake class, we are con-strained to mention the subject of this article, who has made a name and place for himself in the ranks of the leading stockmen of Malheur County, being justly entitled to the position he holds, because of his merit and worth, and because of his brilliant achievements. Albert Shea was born in Owyhee County, Idaho, on February 4, 1872, being the son of Cornelius Shea, the well and widely known stockman of this country. The senior Mr. Shea was one of the heaviest stock owners west of the Rockies and one of the keenest and most energetic operators that ever handled cattle. He sold out his immense herds in 1897, and is now living with his family in San Francisco. He is a native of Canada and came to this section in 1867. Reverting more particularly to our subject, we note that he was educated in San Francisco and also on the farm and in the saddle in...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank O’Neill

The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O’Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the “Harvest Queen.” a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O’Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. “thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were horn to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Loran and Francis P. In 1882, very soon...

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Biographical Sketch of James P. Dickenson

James P. Dickenson has gained a good success in material things in Harney county since his advent here and is one of the substantial and leading stockmen and farmers to-day. He and his family have two good hay farms near the Narrows and also three near Lawen. These fine tracts of land return him annually large amounts of hay and give him opportunity to handle many head of stock. James P. was born in Grayson county, Virginia, on February 18, 1842, being the son of John and Rosa (Hale) Dickenson. He grew up on the farm and gained his education from the common schools, and in the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Company C, Forty-fifth Virginia, as second lieutenant under General John B. Floyd. He was in the battles of Wytheville, Parisburg, Big Sewell Mountain and Carnifax Ferry, besides many skirmishes. At the end of the year for which he enlisted he retired from the army and went home and was chosen tax collector for Grayson county. Eighteen months later he enlisted in the Twenty-second Virginia Cavalry and took part in the battles of Lynchburg and Luray valley, at which last place his horse was shot from under him and he was captured. He languished in the war prison at Point Lookout, Maryland, until the close of the war, July, 1865. The treatment was sever in the prison....

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Biographical Sketch of Nathan Brown

The worthy pioneer and capable business man of whom we now have the privilege of speaking is one of the leaders in the business realm of Burns, being senior member of the firm of N. Brown & Sons, general merchants, who have one of the largest stocks in the county and do a mammoth business, being well established and highly esteemed by all. Mr. Brown was born in Germany, in January, 1835, and at the age of thirteen years came to America. In 1852 he came via Cape Horn to San Francisco, and thence to Oregon City, where he engaged in business for a few years. We next see him in Walla Walla, where he took up the business of general merchandising, and in 1866 he returned to San Francisco and there operated at the clothing business until 1883, at which time he sold out his entire business there and came to Burns. It was 1884 when he entered into business here, taking his two sons, Benjamin and Leon M., as partners. They began in a small way and by careful attention to business and deferential treatment of the patrons have increased their trade until it is at present of far reaching and generous proportions, and success in a very brilliant form is theirs to enjoy. In 1896 they erected a large two-story structure, which they occupy at this...

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Biographical Sketch of N. E. Duncan

It is with pleasure that we are enabled to write concerning the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he has been one of the potent factors in the development of Harney county, has manifested wisdom and enterprise in all his ways here, has labored as a true pioneer in many other sections of the country and has always manifested the same unswerving integrity, moral uprightness and sound principles, having sustained a reputation as an exceptionally reliable man, and ever arraigned on the side of right. Mr. Duncan was born in Williamson county, Illinois, on March 27, 1838, being the son of Dudley W. and Elizabeth Duncan. On April 16, 1859, Mr. Duncan started to New Orleans on the Panama route to California. He had an adventurous spirit and was ready to grapple with the hard problems of pioneer life and has since proved himself of the right kind of stuff. He stopped five days on the way, at Havana, and then landed in San Francisco on May 16. He worked for wages until the fall of 1861, then went by steamer to Portland, Oregon. On April 16, 1863, he started to Auburn, Baker county, arriving there on the 16th of May, and for fifteen years he was numbered with the hardy and worthy miners of that vicinity. It was 1878 that he came to...

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Biography of Henry Louis Dausman A.M., Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Henry Louis Dausman, a physician and surgeon of St. Louis, his native city, was born January 18, 1855. His father, the late Henry Dausman, was a native of Germany but was brought by his parents to America when only two years of age, the family home being established on a farm near Evansville, Indiana. There Henry Dausman was reared, pursuing his education in nearby schools and after reaching a working age learned the tobacco business, thoroughly acquainting himself with that task. In 1850 he became associated in tobacco manufacturing in connection with John E. Liggett under the firm style of Liggett & Dausman. This connection was maintained until 1873, when the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Dausman became a partner of John T. Drummond, organizing the Dausman & Drummond Tobacco Company. This partnership was continued for a number of years, at the end of which time the business was sold to the tobacco trust. At the time of the sale the firm was among the largest conducting business independently in the United States. The death of Henry Dausman occurred in St. Louis in 1891, when he had reached the age of seventy-seven years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Nancy Jones, was a native of Virginia and a representative of one of the old families of that state of English lineage. Her grandfather was an officer...

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Biography of Relf Bledsoe

The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more interesting or romantic tales than our own western history. Into the wild mountain fastnesses of the unexplored west went brave men, whose courage was often called forth in encounters with hostile savages. The land was rich in all natural resources, in gold and silver, in agricultural and commercial possibilities, and awaited the demands of man to yield up its treasures, but its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests difficult to penetrate, and the magnificent trees, the dense bushes or the jagged rocks often sheltered the skulking foe, who resented the encroachment of the pale faces upon these “hunting grounds.” The establishment of homes in this beautiful region therefore meant sacrifices, hardships and oft times death, but there were some men, however, brave enough to meet the red man in his own familiar haunts and undertake the task of reclaiming the district for purposes of civilization. The rich mineral stores of this vast region were thus added to the wealth of the nation; its magnificent forests contributed to the lumber industries and its fertile valleys added to the opportunities of the farmer and stock-raiser, and today the northwest is one of the most productive sections of the entire country. That this is so is due to such men as Captain Relf Bledsoe, whose name is inseparably interwoven...

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