Location: Salina Oklahoma

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. J. B. Moore

(See Grant, Daniel, Adair and Gusoduesga)-Cherokee Cornelia, daughter of Benjamin Franklin and Mary Delilah (McNair) Adair, was born at Salina, January 11, 1881. Graduated from the Cherokee Female Seminary. She married Jan. 10, 1904 James Brutus, son of Alexander Moore, born Nov. 8, 1874. They are the parents of: William Adair, born Dec. 25, 1904; James, B. born March 15, 1907; Lawrence, born June 9, 1910; Mary Eleanor, born May 1, 1913 and Cherokee Adair Moore, born June 1, 1915. On account of a love affair, to which his father objected, Joseph the son of William Martin, a wealthy merchant of Bristol, was given a ship, the Brice, during the first quarter of the eighteenth century and sent to Virginia, when shortly after his arrival he married Susannah Childs, a member of a prominent family and established a plantation near Charlotteville. Their son, Joseph was born there in 1740. The blood of the pioneer, Norman Knight, Martine, who was with William the Conqueror at the fateful cattle of Hastings in October 1066, impelled young Joseph to cross the southern Alleghenys where he became a prosperous fur trader and planter. In 1776, one year after the battle of Lexington, John Martin was elected captain of the Transylvania Militia, he almost unknown but indispensable guard of the revolution that enabled the Americans to send Ferguson back and turned the tide against...

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Biography of Rev. Joseph Franklin Thompson

Rev. Joseph Franklin Thompson, librarian of the Carnegie Library at Tahlequah and superannuated minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, having been retired since 1906, was born May 21, 1841, near Maysville, Arkansas, in what was then the Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory. His parents, both of whom are deceased, were James Allen and Martha (Lynch) Thompson, the former a native of South Carolina and the latter a native of Virginia and a member of an old Cherokee family there. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were married in Georgia and came to Beattie’s Prairie in 1838, with a detachment of Cherokees under Richard Taylor, superintendent of the Cherokee Nation. The father engaged in farming and in the conduct of a mercantile establishment there, achieving more than substantial success. He died in January, 1876. His wife passed away in October, 1872. Six sons and five daughters were born to their union, Joseph Franklin, whose name initiates this review, being the youngest child. In the acquirement of an education Joseph Franklin Thompson attended the schools of the Cherokee Nation and in due time enrolled as a student in the Tahlequah Male Seminary, graduating from the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1861, with the A. B. degree. After leaving school he enlisted for service in the Civil war and served as Sergeant Major for some time, receiving constant promotion until he became Lieutenant...

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Biography of Joseph Tolover Hairston

One of the prominent citizens of Salina is Joseph Tolover Hairston, who was born on the 10th of March, 1862, at Saltillo, Mississippi. The Hairston family is of Scotch descent, its progenitor in this country having migrated from Scotland to Virginia at an early day. His sons, William, John and Peter, removed to South Carolina during the Revolutionary war, and William and John have many descendants in the southern states. The grandfather of Joseph Tolover was William Hairston, who died in his eightieth year. His son, Little Tolover Hairston, fought in the Civil war and was killed at Chickamauga at 4:30 o’clock in the afternoon of September 20, 1863, in the last charge on Snodgrass Hill. He was survived by his widow and two children. She was the daughter of Reuben Morgan, who removed from South Carolina to Mississippi in 1842 and was a large landowner and prominent agriculturist there. His demise occurred in 1860. Sometime after Mr. Hairston’s death, Mrs. Hairston was again married, becoming the wife of Edward G. Norris. Her demise occurred on the 17th of March, 1919. In the acquirement of an education, Joseph Tolover Hairston attended the public schools of Mississippi and in early life became a house and bridge carpenter. In 1888 he came to Oklahoma, then Indian Territory, and engaged in farming and stock raising until 1895, also doing some general contracting....

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Biography of J. Edgar Buffington

J. Edgar Buffington, a representative of an honored pioneer family of Oklahoma, figures prominently in financial circles of northeastern Oklahoma as President of the Vinita National Bank, in which connection he is controlling one of the most substantial moneyed institutions in this part of the state. He was born in that portion of Indian Territory known as the Cherokee Nation, on the 13th of March, 1881, of the union of Ezekiel and Anna (Scarcewater) Buffington and when but an infant lost both of his parents. His boyhood was spent as an inmate of the Cherokee Orphans’ Home at Salina, in which he received his early education, and later he entered the Tahlequah Male Seminary, which he attended for two years, afterward completing a course in a business college at Kansas City. He then came to Vinita, securing a position in the institution which he now represents and with which he has since been identified. Beginning at the bottom of the ladder, he worked his way steadily upward, his diligence and ready adaptability winning him promotion from one position to another of greater importance and responsibility until he is now serving as President, having been chosen to fill that office in 1919, following the death of his cousin, Lucien W. Buffington, who was one of the founders of the institution and a very able financier. Mr. Buffington is well qualified...

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