Location: Rutland Vermont

Biography of Hiland Southworth

Hiland Southworth. Abilene was far out on the western frontier when a young lawyer named Hiland Southworth joined himself to the community in 1878. In the growth and development of the city and surrounding connty Mr. Southworth afterward had a most infinential and active part. His own success and prosperity rose with the community and he made his business, that of investment banking, a tried and sure resource and a bulwark of financial integrity. The judgment and abilities required for the handling of investments both large and small Mr. Southworth possessed to a rare degree approximating genius. Mr. Southworth was of New England ancestry. He was born at Clarendon in Rutland County, Vermont, September 26, 1849, the fourth son of Seymour and Rachel (Sherman) Southworth. His parents were natives of the same town and state, They had ten children, four daughters and six sons. Mr. Southworth grew up on a Vermont farm. His people were thrifty New Englanders, though in moderate circumstances, and they encouraged him to acquire a liberal education. In September, 1871, he entered Middlebury College at Middlebury, Vermont, and was graduated with the honors of his class in 1875. For a year he read law at Rutland, Vermont, and for another year he taught school and read law at the same time at Rosendale, Wisconsin. Coming to Kansas in 1876, Mr. Southworth continued his law reading...

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Biography of Hon. Ruel Rounds

Ex-Senator Ruel Rounds, postmaster and prominent citizen of Idaho Falls, was born in Rutland, Vermont, September 3, 1841, a son of William M. and Maria (Sanderson) Rounds, both natives of Vermont, where his ancestors were early settlers. Forefathers of his in both lines fought for American liberty in the Revolutionary war. His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and wielded an influence for good upon all who knew them. His father, who was a successful farmer, died in his fifty-eighth year. His mother died ten years younger. Of their eight children, five are living and Ruel was the first born. After having gained requisite primary education in the district schools near his home, Ruel Rounds entered Windsor College, from which institution he was “graduated” into the United States Army in May 1861, without waiting to finish his classical course. He became a member of Company K, First Regiment Vermont Volunteer Infantry, and on the l0th of June, the next month after his enlistment, received his “baptism of fire,” in the battle of. Big Bethel. His term of service expired in 1862, and he reenlisted in Company K, Twelfth Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry, which was included in the Army of the Potomac. He was in numerous engagements, among them those of Falmouth, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg; where he participated in heavy and prolonged fighting. At the end of his...

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Warner, Kenneth George – Obituary

Kenneth George Warner, 67, well-known sheep man, died yesterday [May 22, 1939] in St. Anthony’s hospital of a complication of illnesses. He was born in Rutland, Vermont, and came west in 1885 to reside in the Pilot Rock region. In his early life he assisted his father in the sheep business, and later enlisted in The Dalles Company H, participating in overseas activities during the Philippine insurrection. On returning to Oregon, he went into the sheep business for himself. He was also active in the Oregon Wool Growers Association and for two terms was president of the state association. He was a member of the Masconic Order in Pilot Rock, Lodge No. 165 A.F. & A.M.; a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and joined the Methodist Church many years ago. His life was one of industry and integrity and his friends were many. He is survived by his widow, formerly Margaret May Lee, whom he married in 1902, two sons; Lawrence of Pilot Rock; Byron of Burbank, Calif.; one daughter, Ms. R. Allen Bean, of Eugene; two grandchildren, David Allen Bean and Patricia Jean Warner; a brother, Raymond J. Warner of Portland and a sister, Eleanor Richards of Portland. Funeral services will be held at the Bomboy Chapel tomorrow, 2:30 p.m. with Rev. Louis C. Kirby, Methodist pastor, officiating, assisted at the grave by the Masonic order....

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Timothy Todd of Rutland VT

Timothy Todd5, (Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born May 16, 1758, died Dec. 1, 1806, married Nov. 27, 1783, Phebe, daughter of Jehiel Buel of Killingworth, Conn. “Timothy Todd was sergeant after the Lexington Alarm, served as coast guard 150 days. Enlisted May 15, 1780.” He was a physician in Southern Vermont. Dr. Todd removed to Arlington, Vermont, having previously seen Vermont while in the Continental army as he was engaged in the battle of Bennington. “He was active, resolute and Persevering, his professional reputation rising and he soon had an extensive medical practice.” He was a man of considerable literary taste and talent, and wrote many medical and other articles for the journals of the day, and on various occasions pronounced popular orations. A curious little memorandum book of his, still preserved, contains, in his own hand writing, “an abstract view of the miscellaneous writings of Timothy Todd, the unfortunate.” The catalog gives the titles of orations, contributions to magazines, poems and plays, some of which were acted, and some operas, most of them having reference to politics. He was a Freemason and termed a noted mason. He joined the military and bore a captain’s commission. Represented Arlington for at least five years in the General Assembly, and for three years he was a member of the Governor’s Council, a body of twelve men which, under the old Colonial...

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Levi Todd of Aurora IL

Levi Todd6, (Ruel5, Job4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Aug. 29, 1815, in East Wallingford, Vt., died April 10, 1891, in Aurora, Ill., married in Shewsbury, Vt., Jan. 24, 1836, Rachel Walker, daughter of Jonathan and Hannah (Walker) Gibson, who was born June 6, 1818, in Shewsbury, Vt., died Jan. 13, 1874. He married second, in Rutland, Vt., Nov., 1874, Maria Murrow, who died March 13, 1885. With the exception of one year (1839) he lived on the old home farm in East Wallingford, Vt., until 1854, when he with his wife and seven children moved to Illinois, where he bought one hunder and sixty acres of land in Sugar Grove, Kane County. During the summer of that year, he built a house. He carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1869 in which he moved to Aurora, Ill., which was about nine miles east of his farm in Sugar Grove. For the next four years, he was engaged in selling agricultural machinery. From 1873 to the time of his death, he lived a retired life in Aurora, Ill., in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. He was very prosperous in his business ventures in the west, his reliability in business affairs never being questioned. In all his dealings he was scrupulously honest and straightforward and displayed an aptitude for successful management. His word was considered as valuable as any...

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Joel Todd of Rutland VT

Joel Todd7, (Ruel6, Ruel5, Job4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) born June 24, 1843, married first, Addie Knight; second, Weltha Cooper. He is now (1913) living in Rutland, Vt. Child by Addie Knight: *1790. Nettie. Children by Weltha Cooper: 1791. Jerry, d. young. 1792. Harry, he is now (1920) living at 2136 Clinton Ave., New York, N....

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Biography of John Deere

No citizen in Rock Island County, or throughout the country, was probably more widely known than John Deere of Moline. He was born at Rutland, Vermont, February 7, 1804, and died May 17, 1886. 1805 the family moved to Middlebury, Vermont, where the children attended school in a district schoolhouse, which had a long fire place across the end of the room. The reading, writing and little arithmetic obtained here, before he was twelve years old, was the principal educational start Mr. Deere had for life. He afterwards attended private school for a few months, but the inborn inclination for active practical work must assert itself, and the career began, which, for unconquerable energy, determined will, and self-made success, has few equals, if any superiors. Becoming tired of the schoolroom, he hired himself to a tanner to grind bark, and the pair of shoes and suit of clothes purchased with the wages were the first inclination the mother had of John’s doings. At the age of seventeen he became an apprentice to Captain Benjamin Lawrence, and began learning the blacksmith trade. He faithfully worked out his engagement of four years, and was then employed in the shop of William Wells and Ira Allen, to construct iron wagons, buggies and stagecoaches. A year later he was in Burlington, and did the entire wrought iron work on the saw and linseed...

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