Location: Russellville Arkansas

Slave Narrative of Milton Starr

Person Interviewed: Milton Starr Date of Birth: February 24, 1858 I was born a slave, but was not treated like other slaves and my folks never told me anything about slavery. So there is very little I can tell of those days. My birthplace was in the old Flint District of the Cherokee Nation; the nearest town was Russellville, Arkansas, and the farm was owned by Jerry Starr, half-breed Cherokee, who was my master and father. They told me I was born February 24, 1858, right in my master’s house, and when I was a baby had the care of the average white child. My mother was Jane Coursey of Tennessee, a slave girl picked up by the Starrs when they left that country with the rest of the Cherokee Indians. My mother wasn’t bought, just stole by them Indians, and when she was freed she went back to Tennessee; I stayed with Starr family, being raised by Millie and Jerry Starr. Jerry Starr said when the Cherokees come to this country they crossed Barron Fork Creek east of Proctor (Okla); they were riding in a government wagon and they crossed Barron Fork on ice so thick the mules and wagons didn’t break through. My master had a brother named Tom Starr, and he come to this country with some earlier Cherokees than did Jerry. Tom settled at Walking-stick...

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Slave Narrative of John White

Person Interviewed: John White Location: Sand Springs, Oklahoma Date of Birth: April 10, 1816 Age: 121 Occupation: Yard Worker Of all my Mammy’s children I am the first born and the longest living. The others all gone to join Mammy. She was named Mary White, the same name as her Mistress, the wife of my first master, James White. About my paopy. I never hear his name and I never see him, not even when I was the least child around the old Master’s place ‘way back there in Georgia more’n one-hundred twenty years ago! Mammy try to make it clear to me about my daddy. She married like the most of the slaves in then days. He was a slave on another plantation. One day he come for to borrow something from Master White. He sees a likely looking gal, and the way it work out that gal was to be my Mammy. After that he got a paper saying it was all right for his to be off his own plantation. He come a’courting over to Master Whites. After a while he talks with the Master. Says he wants to marry the gal, Mary. The Master says it’s all right if it’s all right with Mary and the other white folks. He finds out it is and they makes ready for the wedding. Mary says a preacher...

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Biography of Judge James P. Wood

Integrity, intelligence and system are qualities which will advance the interests of any man or any profession, and will tend to the prosperity to which all aspire. The life of Judge James P. Wood in the professional arena has been characterized by intelligence, integrity, sound judgment and persevering industry. He is one of Cleburne County’s most popular and capable attorneys, who has acquired prominence because he is worthy of it. He was born on a farm in Barbour County, Ala., in 1843, a son of James and Nancy (Byrd) Wood, who were born, reared and married in the Old North State, and in 1830 moved to Barbour County, Ala., where they both died when fifty-two years of age. The father was prominent in the Democratic circles of Alabama, and also stood high in Masonry and mercantile and agricultural circles. Judge James P. Wood was the eighth of nine children born to his parents, and received his education in the Military Academy of Clayton, Ala. Early in 1861, before Alabama had succeeded from the Union, he had joined the Clayton Guards of the First Alabama Infantry, and was stationed at Pensacola for one year. At the reorganization of the Confederate Army, in 1862, he became a member of Company B, of the Thirty-ninth Alabama Infanty, and held the rank of second lieutenant. On July 28, 1864, when he was wounded...

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Biography of Vernon B. Ellington

Since January, 1919, Vernon B. Ellington has served as postmaster of Wagoner and in that capacity has made an excellent record. He has a thorough understanding of the duties that devolve upon him and is prompt and efficient in their execution. Mr. Ellington was born in Russellville, Arkansas, in March, 1892, a son of Rev. L. G. and Mary A. (Dunlap) Ellington, natives of Tennessee. The father entered the Methodist ministry at the age of eighteen years and preached throughout Tennessee and Arkansas until 1893, when he removed to Indian Territory, where he worked among the Indians in districts where there were no churches. He was active in the ministry until his death in August, 1909. The mother is still living. Vernon B. Ellington was but one year of age when his parents came to Indian Territory and he was reared and received his education in Wagoner. After leaving school he clerked in various stores throughout the community and at the age of eighteen years was employed in the post office. On the 15th of June, 1918, he became acting postmaster and was appointed postmaster in January, 1919, his term expiring in January, 1923. Mr. Ellington is methodical in the discharge of his duties and has carefully systematized the work of the office. On the 15th of August, 1921, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ellington and Miss Cherry...

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