Location: Russell County AL

Slave Narrative of Jim Allen

Interviewer: Mrs. Ed Joiner Person Interviewed: Jim Allen Location: West Point, Mississippi Age: 87 Jim Allen, West Point, age 87, lives in a shack furnished by the city. With him lives his second wife, a much older woman. Both he and his wife have a reputation for being “queer” and do not welcome outside visitors. However, he readily gave an interview and seemed most willing to relate the story of his life. “Yas, ma’m, I ‘members lots about slav’ry time, ’cause I was old ‘nough. “I was born in Russell County, Alabamy, an’ can tell you ’bout my own mammy an’ pappy an’ sisters an’ brudders. “Mammy’s name was Darkis an’ her Marster was John Bussey, a reg’lar old drunkard, an’ my pappy’s name was John Robertson an’ b’longed to Dr. Robertson, a big farmer on Tombigbee river, five miles east of Columbus. De doctor hisself lived in Columbus. “My sister Harriett and brudder John was fine fiel’ hands an’ Marster kep’ ’em in de fiel’ most of de time, tryin’ to dodge other white folks. “Den dere was Sister Vice an’ brudder George. Befo’ I could ‘member much, I ‘members Lee King had a saloon close to Bob Allen’s store in Russell County, Alabama, and Marse John Bussey drunk my mammy up. I means by dat, Lee King tuk her an’ my brudder George fer a whiskey debt....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Rev. W. B. Allen

Interviewer: J. R. Jones Person Interviewed: Rev. W. B. Allen Interviewed: June 29, 1937 Location: Columbus, Georgia Residence: 425-Second Ave, Columbus, Georgia [JUL 28 1937] [TR: Original index refers to “Allen, Rev. W.B. (Uncle Wash)”; however, this informant is different from the previous informant, Washington Allen, interviewed on Dec. 18, 1936. The previous interview for Rev. Allen that is mentioned below is not found in this volume.] In a second interview, the submission of which was voluntarily sought by himself, this very interesting specimen of a rapidly vanishing type expressed a desire to amend his previous interview (of May 10, 1937) to incorporate the following facts: “For a number of years before freedom, my father bought his time from his master and traveled about over Russell County (Alabama) as a journeyman blacksmith, doing work for various planters and making good money—as money went in those days—on the side. At the close of the war, however, though he had a trunk full of Confederate money, all of his good money was gone. Father could neither read nor write, but had a good head for figures and was very pious. His life had a wonderful influence upon me, though I was originally worldly—that is, I drank and cussed, but haven’t touched a drop of spirits in forty years and quit cussing before I entered the ministry in 1879. I learned to...

Read More

Osochi Indians

Osochi Tribe: Meaning unknown. Osochi Connections. Within recent times the closest connections of this tribe have been with the Chiaha, though their language is said to have been Muskhogean, but there is some reason to think that they may have been originally a part of the Timucua. (See below.) Osochi Location. Their best known historic seat was in the great bend of Chattahoochee River, Russell County, Alabama, near the Chiaha. (See also Georgia and Florida.) Osochi Villages. The town of Hotalgi-huyana was populated in part from this tribe and in part from the Chiaha. The census of 1832 gives two settlements, one on the Chattahoochee River and one on a stream called Opillike Hatchee. Osochi History. The suggestion that the Osochi may have been Timucua is founded On the resemblance of their name to that of a Timucua division in northwest Florida called by the Spaniards Ossachile or Ugachile On the fact that after the Timucua uprising of 1656 some of the rebels “fled to the woods,” The later mention of a detached body of Timucua in the neighborhood of the Apalachicola. Early in the eighteenth century they seem to have been living with or near the Apalachicola at the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint. From what Hawkins (1848) tells us regarding them, we must suppose that they moved up Flint River somewhat later and from there to...

Read More

Sawokli Indians

Sawokli Tribe: Possibly meaning “raccoon people,” in the Hitchiti language, and, while this is not absolutely certain, the okli undoubtedly means “people.” Sawokli Connections. The Sawokli belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and to the subdivision called Atcik-hata. (See Apalachicola.) Sawokli Location. The best known historic location was on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of the present Barbour County, Ala. (See Florida and Georgia.) Sawokli Villages Hatchee tcaba, probably on or near Hatchechubbee Creek, in Russell County, Ala. Okawaigi, on Cowikee Creek, in Barbour County, Ala. Okiti-yagani, in Clay County, Ga., not far from Fort Gaines. Sawokli, several different locations, the best known of which is given above. Sawoklutci, on the east bank of the Chattahoochee River, in Stewart County, Ga. Teawokli, probably on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of Russell County, Ala. Sawokli History. When first known to the Spaniards the Sawokli were living on Chattahoochee River below the falls of Columbus, Georgia, on the Alabama side. A Spanish mission, Santa Cruz de Sabacola, was established in one section of the tribe by Bishop Calderón of Cuba in 1675, and missionaries were sent to a larger body among the Creeks in 1679 and again in 1681. Most of the Indians surrounding these latter, however, soon became hostile and those who were Christianized withdrew to the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, where they were settled...

Read More

Apalachicola Indians

Apalachicola Tribe. From Hitchiti “Apalachicoli” or Muskogee “Apalachicolo,” signifying apparently “People of the other side,” with reference probably to the Apalachicola River or some nearby stream. Also called: Talwa lako or Italwa lako, “big town,” name given by the Muskogee Indians. Palachicola or Parachukla, contractions of Apalachicola. Apalachicola Connections. This was one of those tribes of the Muskhogean linguistic stock which spoke the Atsik-hata or Hitchiti language, and which included in addition the Hitchiti, Okmulgee, Oconee, Sawokli, Tamali, Mikasuki, Chiaha, and possibly the Osochi. Apalachicola Location. The earliest known home of the Apalachicola was near the river which bears their name in the center of the Lower Creek country. Later they lived for a considerable period at the point where it comes into existence through the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers. (See also Alabama and Florida.) Apalachicola  Subdivisions and Villages. The following names of towns or tribes were given by a Tawasa Indian, Lamhatty, to Robert Beverley (1722) and may well have belonged to the Apalachicola: Aulbdley, Ephtppick, Sonepáh, and perhaps Socsoóky (or Socsósky). The census of 1832 returned two distinct bodies of Indians under the synonyms Apalachicola and Tälw łåko. Apalachicola History. According to Muskogee legend, the ancestors of the Muskogee encountered the Apalachicola in the region above indicated, when they entered the country, and they were at first disposed to fight with them but soon...

Read More

Native American History of Russell County, Alabama

In 1832 the Treaty of Cusseta transferred the lands of the Creek Confederacy to the United States.  This territory included what is now Russell County. Although most Alabamans today probably assume that the Creek Indians are an ancient, indigenous ethnic group, that once occupied all or most of their state, the Creek Tribe, in fact, is a political entity that is not much older than Alabama itself. The ethnic label “Creek” does not even appear on official British maps until around 1745. Until after the American Revolution, maps described locations of specifically named ethnic groups within the geographical regions denote as “Creek.”  The word “Muscogee” – which nowadays is considered synonymous with “Creek” – does not appear on any maps until late in the 18th Century. Russell County figures very prominently in the pre-European and Federal periods of the Muskogee-Creek history.  Although the archaeological profession is aware of at least some of the Native American town and village sites in Russell County, these archaeological zones have not received public protection, nor are they generally known to those in Russell County charges with the management of the county’s development. The State of Alabama is obviously proud of its Native American history as evidenced by past investments at Moundville, AL.   The State of Alabama was also supportive of the efforts to reconstruct Fort Mitchell in Russell County.  Fort Mitchell functioned as...

Read More

Muskogee Indians

Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled by Shawnee or Chickasaw, probably near Sylacauga, Talladega County. Lun-ham-ga, location unknown. Talladega,...

Read More

Russell County, Alabama Census Records

  1840 Russell County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Russell County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Russell County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Russell County, Alabama: 1840 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Russell County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Russell County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Russell County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Russell County, Alabama: 1850 Census Index 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 1: File 1 Of 1) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 2: File 1 Of 2) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 2: File 2 Of 2) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 3: File 1 Of 2) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 3: File 2 Of 2) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 4: File 1 Of 1) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Beat No. 5: File 1 Of 1) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Other Townships: File 1 Of 5) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Other Townships: File 2 Of 5) 1850 Federal Census Russell County, Alabama (Other Townships: File 3 Of 5) 1850...

Read More

Russell County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Russell County Cemetery Map Hosted at Ancestry.com Cemetery Records of Jefferson County, Alabama$ Pine Grove, Phenix City, Russell County, Alabama Hosted at Russell County, USGenWeb Archives Project Davis Cemetery, Russell, Alabama Evans Cemetery, Russell, Alabama Girard Cemetery (Hood Surname)/Partial – Russell, Al McLendon Family Cemetery Cottonton, Russell Co., AL Hosted at Russell County ALGenWeb Abercrombie Cemetery Inscriptions Russell County, AL Morgan Cemetery Inscriptions Russell County, AL Unknown Cemetery, Russell County, AL – Though titled on page as Abercrombie, it is not....

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest