Location: Rush County IN

Cropper, Robert – Obituary

Robert (Bob) Cropper, age seventy-seven, widely known Shelby township farmer living near Fenns, died at 2:00 a.m. Tuesday [March 19, 1940] at the Major Hospital here following a two-week illness. His death was due to pneumonia. The son of John and Emily Cropper, he was born November 11, 1862, in Rush County, and was married to Mrs. Sarah Hendrickson 45 years ago. She died 24 years ago. One child born to the union died in infancy. Survivors are two nieces, Mrs. Leonard McQueen and Mrs. Earl Shoaf, of Washington township; two half-sisters, both living in California, and a step-son, Earl Hendrickson, of Akron, Ohio. He was a brother of William Cropper, who died in 1936. Funeral services will be held at the C. F. Fix & Son mortuary at 2:00 p.m. Thursday. Rev. Ray Bozell, of Edinburg will officiate, assisted by Rev. Henry White, of Flat Rock, and burial will he made in Forest Hill Cemetery. Friends may call at the mortuary at any time. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of James Madison Harvey

James Madison Harvey, fifth governor of the State of Kansas, was born in Monroe County, Virginia, September 21, 1833, and was the second child and oldest son of Thomas Jefferson and Margaret (Walker) Harvey. His ancestors for several generations were Virginians. His paternal ancestor in America was Henry Harvey, who came from England about 1725, settling in Orange County. Henry Harvey’s son John was the paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketeh. Other ancestors of the colonial period were Michael Woods of Albermarle County, who was a deseendant of a Yorkshire trooper of Cromwell’s army; Capt. Henry Walker, who came to Botetourt Gounty from England a few years before the Revolutionary war; John Handley, an early settler of Augusta County, and Robert Poage of Augusta County, a descendant of Seotch Covenanters. Of the women among his ancestors several were of Seotch descent, Grizelda Pollock, Mary Campbell and Isabella Bruce. Lucy Estes was the maiden name of his paternal grandmother. His parents removed from the Old Dominion when their son James M. was an infant, going first to Rush County, Indiana, thence to Iowa, and finally to Adams County, Illinois, where both died, leaving their children a goodly heritage in all save worldly wealth. Besides their own family of nine children, their household included a large family of orphaned nephews and nieces, and the combined family of cousins had...

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Biography of Robert Groves

Robert Groves, now living retired at Sidney, when in his prime was regarded as one of the keenest and best judges of live stock in Champaign County. He has had a long and useful career, and one that is deserving of more than passing mention. Mr. Groves was born in Rush County, Indiana, at the town of Fairview, September 17, 1839, son of Joseph and Nancy (Baker) Groves. The original Groves came from Havre de Grace. Maryland, and distributed themselves in the states of Kentucky and Indiana. A more remote origin of the family is found in Holland, where Hans and Jacob, known in English as John and Jacob, Graff lived and emigrating from that country they bought land from William Penn in Pennsylvania. The name Graff became in time Grove. These two brothers married and settled in Pennsylvania and reared large families who in subsequent generations moved to Virginia, Ohio, Indiana and other states. From the first they were noted as progressive and ambitious men, and it used to be a common saying in Pennsylvania there was never a lazy Groves known. They excelled as hunters and were among the brave frontiersmen. On one occasion two Groves brothers, John and Mike, were returning with some young men from a deer hunt in Pennsylvania. They met a small war party of Indians, from whose belt hung the scalps of...

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Biography of George Egbert Shawhan

George Egbert Shawhan was for twenty-one years county superintendent of schools in Champaign County, and in this county, which has been his home for over sixty years, he has found ample opportunities for a life of quiet usefulness and service. He was born at Falmouth, Rush County, Indiana, March 20, 1844. His grandfather, John Shawhan, was probably a native of Pennsylvania, but was reared in Kentucky and combined his work as a minister of the Presbyterian Church with practical farming. He died in Kentucky. He married a Miss Flowers, who was born and reared in Virginia. William McCune Shawhan, father of George E., was born near Lexington, Kentucky, grew up in Bourbon County in that state, in 1837 removed to Rush County, Indiana, and on April 17, 1856, arrived in Champaign County, settling in Section 19 of Raymond Township. He was a practical farmer and also did considerable business as a cattle shipper. He lived on his farm in Champaign County until his death. He was attending church at Sidney and died without a word during the service on May 5, 1875. He was an active member of the Church of Christ or Disciples Church, was a Democrat in politics, and at the time of his death was acting as supervisor of Raymond Township. He married Nancy Redmond, daughter of a Kentucky farmer. She was born on a farm...

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Biography of Hiram W. Oliver

HIRAM W. OLIVER. – It is with pleasure that we are enabled to grant to the esteemed pioneer and capable citizen whose name is at the head of this article a representation in the history of the county of Union, where he has labored long and faithfully, both for its advancement and development and for the successful culmination of his various business enterprises, wherein he has demonstrated a consummate wisdom in handling the raw resources of the wild country and in subduing it and bringing forth the wealth that lay wrapped in its coffers of natural stores, while also he has manifested a stanch and upright character, unswerving integrity, and capabilities of the best order. Hiram W. was born on December 29, 1827, in Rush county, Indiana, being the son of Elijah T. and Catherine (Boone) Oliver. Catherine Oliver was a granddaughter of a brother of the famous Daniel Boone. He came to Kentucky with Daniel and brought his family there. Another brother, Isaac Boone, was killed in the battle on the Raisin river. With his parents, our subject removed to Cass county, thence to Pulaski county and in the spring of 1849 to Morgan county, the latter being in Illinois. Soon after, they went thence to Marion county,Iowa. In January, 1855, Mr. Oliver returned to Scott county, Illinois, to marry the lady of his choice, Miss Julia A....

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Biography of Col. James L. Abernathy

Col. James L. Abernathy. For nearly a half century one of the conspicuous figures in Kansas history was the late James L. Abernathy, whose name is inseparably interwoven with the material prosperity of Leavenworth, to which he came in 1856, when it was but a frontier town. He was born in Warren County, Ohio, March 20, 1833. In early manhood he accompanied his parents in their removal to Rush County, Indiana, and at Rushville, the county seat, embarked in mercantile pursuits. In the early ’50s the great West, then represented by the vast unsettled territory west of the Missouri River, seemed to possess glamour and fascination for the adventurous spirit of American youth, and it found lodgment in the mind of young Abernathy. In 1856 the contention of the free soil and proslavery factions for possession of Kansas soil, and the notable public debates of the time, had focused attention on this section of the country. This may have had something to do with Mr. Abernathy’s choice of Leavenworth as a home. Undoubtedly he was attracted by the business possibilities of the place, for it was full of bustle and enterprise, a frontier forwarding point for the rapidly increasing population. He was accompanied by his brother, William, and together they embarked in the retail furniture business, in a small way beginning the manufacture of furniture, and this was the...

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Biography of William S. Tyner

William S. Tyner was one of the early settlers of Kansas, though he lived in the state only a few years, but founded a family which had become especially well known and prominent in Osage County. The Tyners were an old and prominent family of Indiana. William S. Tyner was one of seven sons and was born on a farm in Rush County, Indiana, September 20, 1820. His parents were John and Nancy (Sailors) Tyner, both Indiana people. William S. Tyner was a consin of James N. Tyner, who served as postmaster-general under President Hayes. The early education of William S. Tyner was acquired in the district school of Rush County. When he was nineteen years of age his family removed to Wabash County in that state. In 1842 William Hyner married Mary Washburn of Indiana. Six children were born to their union: Milton, deceased; Helen, Mrs. Hiza Wilson of Michigan Valley, Kansas; Jonas of California; Willis H. of Lyndon; Arminda, who lives on the old homestead in Indiana; Edgar, deceased; and Melvin of Arcadia, Tennessee. The Indiana home of William S. Tyner for many years was a 160-acre farm. There he and his wife reared their family. In 1869 he followed two of his older sons, Milton and Jonas, to Kansas, located on a farm of a quarter section in Douglas County. In Douglas County he became prominent...

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Biographical Sketch of William B. Hawkins

William B. Hawkins, retired farmer; P. O. Humbolt; the subject of this sketch is one of the early settlers of this township; he was born in Boone Co., Ky., July 31, 121. He married Miss Abigail Morgan Feb. 20, 1843; she was born in Ohio, and died Oct. 8, 1846; they had two children, viz., Francis M. and Louisa A.; his present wife was Miss Nancy Danner; they were married Oct. 4, 1848; she was born in Rush Co., Ind., Oct. 11, 1823; he lived about two and a half years in Kentucky,. when, with his parents, he moved to Rush Co., Ind., where they engaged in farming; he lived there until 1840; be then came to Illinois and engaged by the month on a farm on the Okaw, now in Coles Co.; he lived there about eighteen months, then went to Indiana, and lived there until 1850, when he again came to Coles Co. and settled in Humbolt Tp., about one mile from the present village of Humbolt; at this time there were less than one dozen settlers in this township; he lived on his farm until 1865, then here to the village; he was the first Township Collector in this township and served in offices connected with the school and road; he yet retains the old homestead, he takes no active part in its management; in 1866,...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Bell

Henry Bell, farmer; P. O. Hutton; was born in Randolph Co., N. C., in the year 1819; his parents Pierce and Rebecca moved to Preble Co., Ohio., in the year 1820, and after remaining about fifteen years, moved to Rush Co., Ind., where they lived for about fifteen or twenty years; in 1850, they came to Coles Co. and settled on Sect 16, where his father died at the age of 88, his mother dying the year afterward. Mr. Bell moved to his present farm on Sec. 15 Feb. 14, 1856, containing 80 acres. In 1843, he married in Indiana Miss Sarah Cox (daughter of Isaac Cox, of North Carolina); she died in the year 1853; they had five children; one living, Mary (now Mrs. N. Dunbar, of Charleston), born March, 1866; and four died-Jane E., Sarah E., Eli and one that died in infancy. He married his second wife Mrs. Nancy Brewer (widow of Jesse Bell), Feb. 12, 1853; she died Aug. 5, 1875; they had eleven children, all living – Jonas V., born Nov., 10, 1854; Jesse B., Nov. 19, 1856; Lucretia, March 17, 1858; William H., June 10, 1859; Alman, Oct. 14, 1860; Louisa, June 23, 1862; John, Oct. 22, 1863; Margaret D., May 14, 1865; Charles M., Oct. 28, 1866; Susanna, August 23, 186S, and James E., born March 4,...

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Biography of Hon. Amos F. Tullis

HON. AMOS F. TULLIS. – Amos F. Tullis was born January 6, 1830, at Carthage, Rush county, Indiana. Both of his parents were natives of Ohio, and, having migrated to Indiana, followed farming. At the age of five years his mother died; and five years later his father followed her to the great silent majority, leaving a family of four sons and two daughters, of whom Amos was the fourth child. He lived on the farm of his parents until 1846, when he accompanied an older sister with her husband to Iowa. He resided at Mount Pleasant, Burlington and Ottumwa in that state until March 18, 1852. On that date, with his two brothers, John, now deceased, and James, now one of the substantial farmers of Lewis county, he started with ox-teams to cross the plains for Oregon. They arrived at Portland on the 8th of August. They did not tarry at that embryo metropolis, but started for Olympia, on Puget Sound (then Oregon Territory), which they reached August 27th. Mr. Tullis found immediate employment in the sawmill of Ward & Hays at Tumwater, and shortly afterwards leased the mill for six months. He loaded the ship Leonesa with the entire result of his occupancy, and accompanied her to San Francisco, intrusting the sale of the same to a commission merchant in San Francisco; but not a dollar was...

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Biographical Sketch of Moore, O. S.

Moore, O. S. proprietor of the Golden Rule steam flouring-mills. These mills were erected in 1880, size of which are 32×52 feet and 45 feet high, built of stone, capacity is 100 barrels in twenty-four hours, cost is $22,000. They do an exchange business only in custom work. They employ six men besides their own help. Mr. O. S. Moore first came to Bunker Hill in August 1878. He was born in Brown County, Ohio in 1848; was raised and educated in Rush County, Ind.; family moving there in 1854. Married in 1879 to Miss Carrie S. Edwards, of Binghamton, N. Y. They have two children: Jessie G. and an infant son not yet named. He is a member of Russell Lodge No. 115, I. O. O....

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Biography of Rev. Augustus H. Tevis

The scholarly subject of this sketch is a native of Rush County, Indiana, born on his father’s farm, May 13, 1841, and was the ninth child of a family of three sons and seven daughters. His parents were Dr. Daniel H. and Phoebe (Scott) Tevis, the former having been a physician by profession,—a self-made man, who enjoyed a large and lucrative practice. He (Dr. Daniel H.) was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, and was quite a scholar as a linguist, being a proficient in both Latin and Greek. The elder Dr. Tevis died in 1858, and his wife in 1862, both of whom are buried in Rush county, Indiana. After his father’s death, the management of the extensive farming operations, embracing several large farms, left by him, all devolved on Augustus H., then but seventeen years old. In 1860 he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana, then under the control of Bishop Bowman. Early in the beginning of the civil troubles, however, young Tevis left college to volunteer like a true patriot and aid in suppressing the rebellion. He enlisted in September, 1861, and became second lieutenant of company H, thirty-seventh Indiana volunteers. He was in active service for over three years, participating in many hard battles, fights and skirmishes, including Stone river, New Hope Church, Resacca, before Atlanta, and numerous others. At Stone river, he was slightly wounded,...

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