Location: Rowan County NC

Memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom

I will here present to the reader the memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom the oldest of the three brothers who cast their lot in their morning” of life among” the Choctaws, and became the fathers of the Folsom House in the Choctaw Nation, as related by himself to the missionary, Rev. Cyrus Byington, June, 1823, and furnished me by his grand-daughter Czarena Folsom, now Mrs. Rabb. “I was born in North Carolina, Rowan County, May 17th, 1756. My father was born in Massachusetts or Connecticut. My mother was born in New Jersey. My parents moved to Georgia, and there my father sent me to school about six months, during which time I learned to read and write. My mother taught me to read and spell at home. My father had a great desire to go to Mississippi to get money; they said money grew on bushes! We got off and came into the Choctaw Nation. The whole family came; we hired an Indian pilot who led us through the Nation to Pearl River, where we met three of our neighbors who were re turning on account of sickness. This alarmed my father, who then determined to return to North Carolina. We came back into the Nation to Mr. Welch’s, on Bok Tuklo (Two Creeks), the father of Mr. Nail. At this time I was about 19 years of age. At...

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John Alexander – Descendants

The Genealogy of the Alexander family, into which Robert Love, commonly known as “Carter Bob”(my Father-F.D. Love) married, having married Sarah Matilda Alexander, May 25th, 1848, Alexanders —- John Alexander, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, where he married Rachel Davidson (a first cousin of General William Davidson, who in the War of the Revolution was killed at Cowan’s Ford of the Catawba River in resisting the passage of Cornwallis), daughter of John Davidson. John Alexander removed from Rowan County to Lincoln County, North Carolina; thence to Buncombe County, (the Burke County) North Carolina (one of its first settlers); thence to Tennessee, settled on the Harpeth River where he and his wife died. His son, James Alexander, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, on Buffalo Creek, December 23rd, 1756. He removed thence to Crowder’s Creek, Lincoln County, North Carolina, near King’s Mountain, and participated in the great battle fought at that place last mentioned on the American side. On March 19th, 1782, he married Rhoda Cunningham, who was born in Pennsylvania, October 13th, 1763 and moved thence to Maryland and thence to York District, South Carolina. James Alexander (Presbyterian) and wife removed to Buncombe County (then Burke), North Carolina, and settled at the Alexander Place on Bee Tree Creek near where it empties into the Swannanoa River, ten miles East of Asheville. Here he died in 1844....

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Slave Narrative of Charley Watson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Charley Watson Location: South Carolina Age: 87 “Dis is a mighty hot day I tells you, and after climbing them steps I just got to fan myself befo’ I give answer to your questions. You got any ‘bacco I could chaw and a place to spit? Dis old darkie maybe answer more better if he be allowed to be placed lak dat at de beginnin’ of de ‘sperience. “Where was I born? Why right dere on de Hog Fork Place, thought everybody knowed dat! It was de home place of my old Marster Daniel Hall, one of de Rockefellers of his day and generation, I tells you, he sho was. My pappy had big name, my marster call him Denmore, my mammy went by de name of Mariyer. She was bought out of a drove from Virginny long befo’ de war. They both b’long to old marster and bless God live on de same place in a little log house. Let’s see; my brother Bill is one, he livin’ at de stone quarry at Salisbury, North Carolina. My sister Lugenie marry a Boulware nigger and they tells me dat woman done take dat nigger and make sumpin’ out of him. They owns their own automobile and livin’ in Cleveland, Ohio. “Us live in quarters, two string of houses a quarter mile long and...

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Biography of Hon. Archibald Henderson

Hon. Archibald Henderson was born in Granville county, N.C., on the 7th of August, 1768; studied law with Judge Williams, his relative, and was pronounced by the late Judge Murphy, who knew him long and well, to be “the most perfect model of a lawyer that our bar has produced.” … No man could look upon him without pronouncing him one of the great men of the age. The impress of greatness was upon his countenance; not that greatness which is the offspring of any single talent or moral quality, but a greatness which is made up by blending the faculties of a fine intellect with exalted moral feelings. Although he was at all times accessible and entirely free from austerity, he seemed to live and move in an atmosphere of dignity. He exacted nothing by his manner, yet all approached him with reverence and left him with respect. His was the region of high sentiment; and here he occupied a standing that was pre-eminent in North Carolina. He contributed more than any man, since the time of General Davie and Alfred Moore, to give character to the bar of the State. His career at the bar has become identified with the history of North Carolina: and his life and his example furnish themes for instruction to gentlemen of the bench and to his brethren of the bar. May...

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Biography of Mrs. Elizabeth Steele

The long, arduous and eventful retreat of General Morgan through the Carolinas, after the battle of the Cowpens, and the eager pursuit of Cornwallis to overtake him, encumbered with more than five hundred prisoners, on his way to a place of safety in Virginia, affords many interesting incidents. General Greene having met Morgan on the eastern banks of the Catawba river, at Sherrill’s Ford, and directed his forward movements, proceeded to Salisbury, a little in advance of his forces. It had been slightly raining during the day, and his wet garments, appearance of exhaustion and dejection of spirits at the loss of General Davidson at Cowan’s Ford, as he dismounted at the door of the principal hotel in Salisbury, indicated too clearly that he was suffering under harassing anxiety of mind. Dr. Reed, who had charge of the sick and wounded prisoners, while he waited for the General’s arrival, was engaged in writing the necessary paroles for such officers as could not go on. General Greene’s aids having been dispatched to different parts of the retreating army, he was alone when he rode up to the hotel. Dr. Reed, noticing his dispirited looks, remarked that he appeared to be fatigued; to which the wearied officer replied: “Yes, fatigued, hungry, alone, and penniless!” General Greene had hardly taken his seat at the well-spread table, when Mrs. Steele, the landlady of...

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Biography of Richmond Pearson

Richmond Pearson, late of Davie county when a part of Rowan, was born in Dinwiddie county, Va., in 1770, and at the age of nineteen years came to North Carolina and settled in the forks of the Yadkin river. When the war of the Revolution broke out he was a Lieutenant in Captain Bryan’s company (afterward the celebrated Colonel Bryan, of Tory memory). After the Declaration of Independence, at the first muster which occurred, he requested some on whom he could rely to load their guns. When Captain Bryan came on the ground he ordered all the men into ranks. Pearson refused, and tendered his commission to Bryan, whereupon he ordered him under arrest. This was resisted, and he was told that the men had their guns loaded. They then came to a parley, and it was agreed by the crowd, as matters stood, that Bryan and Pearson, on a fixed day, should settle this national affair by a fair “fist fight”, and whichever whipped, the company should belong to the side of the conqueror, whether Whig or Tory. At the appointed time and place the parties met, and the Lieutenant proved to be the victor. From this time the Fork company was for liberty, and Bryan’s crowd, on Dutchman’s creek, were Loyalists. The anecdote illustrates by what slight circumstances events of this period were affected. When Cornwallis came...

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Biography of General Griffith Rutherford

General Griffith Rutherford was an Irishman by birth, brave and patriotic, but uncultivated in mind and manners. He resided west of Salisbury, in the Locke settlement, and actively participated in the internal government of the county, associated with such early and distinguished patriots as Moses Winslow, Alexander Osborn, Samuel Young, John Brevard, James Brandon, William Sharpe, Francis McCorkle, and others. He represented Rowan county in the Provincial Congress which met at Halifax on the 4th of April, 1776, and during this session he received the appointment of Brigadier General of the “Salisbury District.” Near the close of the summer of 1776, he raised and commanded an army of two thousand four hundred men against the Cherokee Indians. After being reinforced by the Guilford Regiment, under Colonel James Martin, and by the Surry Regiment under Colonel Martin Armstrong, at Fort McGahey, General Rutherford crossed the “Blue Ridge,” or Alleghany mountains, at Swannanoa Gap, near the western base of which the beautiful Swannanoa river (“nymph of beauty”) takes its rise. After reaching the French Broad he passed down and over that stream at a crossing-place which to this day bears the name of the “War Ford.” He then passed up the valley of “Hominy Creek,” leaving Pisgah Mountain on the left, and crossed Pigeon River a little below the mouth of East Fork. He then passed through the mountains to Richland...

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J. C. Austin

Cook, 15th Co., Infantry. Son of J. H. and M. M. Austin. Husband of L. A. Austin, of Rowan County. Entered service June 6, 1918, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Was mustered out of service at Camp Sevier, S. C., November 30th,...

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G. B. Weaver

Private 1st Class, Co. C, 81st Div., 306th F Signal; of Rowan County; son of W. A. and Mrs. S. A. Weaver. Husband of Mrs. Nealie L. Weaver. Entered service May 29, 1917, at Salisbury, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., then to Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y. Mustered out at Camp Merritt, N. J., Nov. 10,...

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Gentery Weant

Private, Engrs., Co. E, 30th Div., 105th Regt.; of Rowan County; son of J. H. and Mrs. Cora Weant. Husband of Mrs. Eva Weant. Entered service March 30, 1918, at High Point, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., to Camp Mills. Sailed for France; landed July 2, 1918. Voormizelle, Belgium, Sept. 1st; Bellicourt Sept. 29th; La Selle River; Mazinghein, France, Oct. 17th to 20th. Returned to USA April 19, 1919; landed at Charleston, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 24,...

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George Tichle

1st Class Private, Co. C, 29th Div., 116th Inf.; of Rowan County; son of W. H. and Mrs. Alice G. Tichle. Husband of Mrs. Sallie Tichle. Entered service July 23, 1917, at Danville, Va. Sent to Camp McClellan, Ala. Sailed for Brest, France. Battles July 25th to Sept. 23rd, defensive of Center Sector, Haute, Alsace, Oct. 8, 1918; battle of Malbrick Hill Oct. 10, 1918; battle of Malselle Farm Oct. 16, 1918; battle of Grand Montague Oct. 23rd; capture of Etroye Ridge. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., May 29,...

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Abraham Saleeby

Private, 22nd Receiving Depot; from Rowan County, N.C. Entered the service at Salisbury, N.C., July 6, 1918, and sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. Mustered out of the service at Camp Hancock, Ga., Jan. 13, 1919. Was discharged as member 6th Group, Hdqrs. Co., Q. M....

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Charles L. Shaver

Capt., Inf., Co. N, 5th Div., 6th Regt.; of Rowan County; son of Robt. L. and Mrs. Margaret V. Shaver. Husband of Mrs. Sudie D. Shaver. Entered service Feb. 23, 1903, at Salisbury, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., transferred to Camp Forrest. Sailed for Brest, France, April 9, 1918. Promoted to rank of 1st. Lt. Nov. 27, 1917; to Capt. June 30, 1918. Fought at St. Die offensive. Returned to USA Sept. 9, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Sept. 12,...

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James E. Sifford

2nd Signal Q. M. C. (Navy). Born Sept. 4, 1900; son of W. L. and Fannie J. Sifford, of Rowan County. Entered the service June 3, 1918, at Raleigh, N.C. Sent to Hampton Roads, Naval Base. Was on board U. S. S. Ohio, second line battleship. One trip across; landed at Brest, France. Mustered out at Hampton Roads, Naval Base, March 24,...

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Curtis Van Wyatt

Private, Btry. D. 53rd F. A.; of Rowan County; son of J. E. and Mrs. Janetta Wyatt. Husband of Mrs. Mary Alice Wyatt. Entered service March 6, 1918, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Ft. Scriven, Ga., transferred to Camp Stuart, Va. Sailed for Brest, France, Aug. 25, 1918. Fought at Verdun Sector, Argonne Forest. Sailed for USA Feb. 25, 1919. Landed March 11, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Eustis, Va., March 23,...

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