Location: Ross County OH

The War with the Indians of the West during Washington’s Administration

After the termination of the Revolutionary War, the hardy settlers of the west had still a contest to maintain, which often threatened their extermination. The Indian tribes of the west refused to bury the hatchet when Great Britain withdrew her armies, and they continued their terrible devastation. The vicinity of the Ohio River, especially, was the scene of their operations.

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Biography of W. D. McDonald

W. D. McDonald was born in Ross county, Ohio, August 6, 1826. His parents, William and Mary McDonald, were both natives of Virginia. His mother was a daughter of Nathaniel Wilson who was the first State printer of Ohio, and a sister of the late Nathaniel Wilson, who with his father started the Scioto Gazette in 1800, in Scioto county, one of the first papers of Ohio. Mr. Wilson died a few years ago at the age of ninety-two years-the oldest editor then in America. Our subject was five years old when his father died and he was reared by Ex-Governor McArthur, of Ohio, and educated in the select schools of Chillicothe, Ohio. After he quit school he dealt in cattle, driving them to the eastern markets, and continued that business for about seven years. He then engaged at farming which has been his avocation since. In 1854 he settled in Peoria county, Illinois, and in 1856 came to this county. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Thirty-third Enrolled State Militia and at the organization was appointed adjutant, and soon after was appointed by the governor commissary of exemption, which place he filled for one year, was then appointed acting adjutant general for Colonel Williams, commanding this district, with headquarters at St. Joseph, and held that position under the following officers as they came in command of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph S. Chenoweth

Joseph S. Chenoweth, the subject of this sketch, was born in Ross county,. Ohio, on the 18th of February, 1833. His father, Richard Chenoweth, was a native of Kentucky,. and a farmer; his mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Smith, and she was a native of Maryland. They became the parents of eight children, of whom Joseph is the sixth, and when he attained the age of three years, they removed to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and three years later to Missouri,. settling in Grundy county. There Joseph was reared and educated’, and there his father died in 1861, and his mother in 1879. Young Chenoweth began business for himself when twenty years of age, as a carpenter in Grundy county, where he resided until 1865, when he came to Jamesport, where he has since been engaged working at his trade. Joseph S. Chenoweth was united in marriage, on the 25th of August,. 1859, to Miss Sarah A. Forshay, daughter of Edward and Sarah Forshay, of Indiana. She was born near Lebanon, Ohio, January 28, 1839: By this union they have three children, Lilian R., Sarah E., and Joan. Mrs. Chenoweth is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Chenoweth is a Republican in politics; and is a member of the Jamesport Lodge No. 201, A. F. & A. M. He has, by strict attention to his business, won the...

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Illinois Burial Customs

The term Illinois Indians as used by some early writers was intended to include the various Algonquian tribes, encountered in the “Illinois country,” in addition to those usually recognized as forming the Illinois confederacy. Thus, in the following quotation from Joutel will be found a reference to the Chahouanous – i. e., Shawnee – as being of the Islinois, and in the same note Accancea referred to the Quapaw, a Siouan tribe living on the right bank of the Mississippi, not far north of the mouth of the Arkansas. Describing the burial customs of the Illinois, as witnessed by him during the latter years of the seventeenth century, Joutel wrote: ” They pay a Respect to their Dead, as appears by their special Care of burying them, and even of putting into lofty Coffins the Bodies of such as are considerable among them, as their Chiefs and others, which is also practised among the Accancea’s, but they differ in this Particular, that the Accancea’s weep and make their Complaints for some Days, where as the Chahoaanous, and other People of the Islinois Nation do just the Contrary; for when any of them die, they wrap them up in Skins, and then put them into Coffins made of the Barks of Trees, then sing and dance about them for twenty four Hours. Those Dancers take Care to tie Calabashes, or...

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Biography of Judge John Brown

Judge John Brown has been for over sixty years identified with the best interests of Douglas County. He was born in Ross County, Ohio, May 7, 1822, on a farm, where he remained until the age of seventeen. This farm was located on Paint creek, two miles from Chillicothe, the County seat of Ross County. Our subject is a son of Nimrod Brown, who was a native of Augusta County, Virginia, and who served in the war of 1812. His mother was, before her marriage, Elizabeth Eigelbright, and was born in Monroe County, Virginia. When our subject was but seven years old his father died, and his mother, with three sons and four daughters, emigrated to what is now Douglas County, in about 1838, and settled in what is now Sargent Township. The Judge’s paternal grandfather, Washington Brown, was a Virginian by birth. At the time his mother located in Sargent Township she was very poor, the oldest son, Washington, managing the business. Land at that time sold for from four to six dollars an acre, but money was very scarce. This was in September, 1838, the date of his mother’s settlement in Sargent Township. Judge Brown married in 1844, Sally Ann Barnett, who was a daughter of William and Mary Barnett, natives of Kentucky and early settlers in Vermilion County. Mrs. Brown died in 1853, leaving one child,...

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Biography of David Wolff

DAVID WOLFF. In the whole range of commercial enterprise no interest is of more importance than that representing the sale of groceries. This fact is recognized and appreciated by all thoughtful and intelligent persons. In this connection we take pleasure in calling attention to a house which, though only established since 1883, has already proved itself to be indispensable to the locality. David Wolff is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Ross County January 2, 1852, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth Wolff, both of whom died in Ohio. This worthy couple were the parents of seven children, only two besides our subject now living: Charles A., who is still in Ohio, and Fredrick, who is in Kalamazoo, Mich. One son, William, who died in 1883, was a soldier in the Civil War as was also Charles and Fredrick. John, another son, died after reaching mature years, and the remainder of the children, daughters, died young. The Wolff family settled in Ohio at an early date and the father of our subject was a merchant there. He was a native of Germany and came to this country when young. David Wolff attained his growth in his native State and was about nine years of age when his father died. He received his scholastic training in his native town and when twenty-one years of age started...

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Biography of Arthur Robinson Stewart

Arthur Robinson Stewart’s chief work in Champaign County has been as an unusually competent and capable farmer. It is one of the larger and better managed places in Champaign Township where he has put into practice the accumulated wisdom and experience of many years as an agriculturist and stockman. Mr. Stewart and family are well known socially in their country community and also in the city centers of the county. He was born in Ross County, Ohio, July 25, 1855, but in the same year was brought to Champaign County by his parents, Samuel G. and Jane (Evans) Stewart. His father was born in New York State, April 4, 1816, and his mother in Ohio on December 28, 1820. After coming to Champaign County Samuel Stewart located land in Somers Township, and gave his time and toil to the improvement and cultivation of that farm for many years. His death occurred May 10, 1891. His wife had died August 26, 1867, and both were buried in Champaign. There were nine children: Esther, who died April 3, 1908; William, who became a Union soldier and died while still in the service at Memphis, Tennessee, October 20, 1863, being then little past twenty-one, since he was born January 14, 1842; Martha Ann, born October 28, 1843, died December 12, 1881; Mary E., born March 10, 1845, died July 15, 1893; Jane...

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Biography of J. W. Remley

J. W. Remley. The winning of a comfortable prosperity after many struggles with fortune and the establishment and provision for a home and place as an honored and influential citizen of his community is short measure of the accomplishment of J. W. Remley, who for many years has been identified with Champaign County. Mr. Remley is proprietor of the Pleasant Vale Stock Farm in Harwood Township, in section 14. He was born in Ross County, near Chillicothe, Ohio, a son of Alexander and Cutright Remley. His parents were also natives of Ohio. There were five children in the family and they were educated in district school No. 4 of Springfield Township in Ross County. When J. W. Remley was sixteen years of age, in March, 1875, his mother died and later his father married again. At the age of twenty-three J. W. Remley left home for Indiana. When he reached Indianapolis he was persuaded by his sister to come on to Champaign County, Illinois. When he first came here it was with the intention of remaining only a year, but he became so well satisfied with the country that it took a hold upon him as. a permanent residence. Two years after coming to Champaign County Mr. Remley established a home of his own by his marriage to Miss Amelia A. Reynolds. She was born in Knox County, Illinois,...

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Biography of Warren S. Plummer

Warren S. Plummer, former county clerk of Pottawatomie County, is secretary, treasurer and manager of the Westmoreland Mercantile Company, the largest general merchandise house in business at the county seat. Mr. Plummer started life with an earnest purpose, and had steadily kept that in view and by industry and honorable dealings had attained a position where he is recognized as one of the leading men of his home county. He is a native of Pottawatomie County, having been born near the present Village of Flush, then known as Myers Valley, on January 7, 1875. He is of old American stock, the Plummers having come from England and settled in Virginia in Colonial times. His father Hezekiah Plummer was one of the early settlers in Pottawatomie County. He was born near Chillicothe, Ohio, in February, 1826, and when a boy entered upon an apprenticeship at the cooper and wagon making trade. He became a skilled workman. He was reared and married near Chillicothe and from there moved to Indiana. In 1862 he volunteered his services in Company I of the Thirtieth, Indiana Infantry, but after six months of service was discharged on account of disability. He then went back to Chillicothe, Ohio, and lived there until 1868, which was the date of his coming to Pottawatomie County. He took up a homestead, developed it as a farm, and sold out...

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Biography of Presley M. Bruner

A prominent practitioner at the bar of Hailey, and ex-district attorney of Alturas (now Blaine) County, Idaho, Presley Morris Bruner, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. September 15, 1850. On the paternal side is of German lineage, and on the maternal of Scotch descent. His father, J. A. Bruner, was born in Virginia, a representative of one of the old and prominent families of that state, living in the Blue mountain region. He married Miss Margaret Morris, a daughter of Judge Presley Morris, of Chillicothe, Ohio. Her father was a descendant of the McDonald clan of the highlands of Scotland, and traced his ancestry back to Mary, Queen of Scots. Mr. Bruner’s father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and devoted fifty-six years of his life to spreading the gospel of peace on earth, good will to men. He removed to California in 1856, going by way of the isthmus, and spent the remainder of his days as a member of the California conference. He was a man of scholarly attainments, of marked ability in his chosen calling, a persuasive speaker and a power for good among men. He departed this life in 1892, at the age of seventy years, and his wife passed away three years previously, at the age of sixty-nine. She was to him a most faithful helpmeet, ably assisting him in his work, and...

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Biography of Frederick William Herman

Frederick William Herman identified with a number of substantial business enterprises at Lincoln, Kansas, Frederick William Herman, who had been a resident of Lincoln County since 1873, conducts them with the thorough efficiency that brings profit to himself and contributes also to the commercial prosperity of the city. Mr. Herman is a grain merchant and owned a fine elevator. He is also an extensive grower of flowers and vegetables and markets the same all over this section of the state. Frederick William Herman was born in Ross County, Ohio, September 21, 1851. His parents were Alexander and Amelia (Bodenstadt) Herman. The father was born in Germany in 1809, came to the United States in 1839 and died in Ross County, Ohio, in 1885. By trade he was a silversmith. He was married in Germany to Amelia Bodenstadt, who was born there in 1811, and died in Lincoln County, Kansas, in 1895. They came to America at a time when the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean consumed fifty-two days. They settled first in Pennsylvania and from there moved to Ohio. They were members of the Lutheran Church but later in life united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and were always liberal supporters of the same. They became the parents of the following children: Henry, who was a soldier in the Union army in the Civil war and lost his life...

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Biographical Sketch of Ludwig S. Conelly

Conelly, Ludwig S.; real estate; born, Ross County, O., 1883; son of George B. and Elizabeth Shaner Conelly; educated in country schools of Ross County, O., and finished in the grammar schools of Cleveland; married, Cleveland, Nov. 24, 1904; Sadie M. Cummings; issue, son (1906), and daughter (1911); first lieut. Cleve-land Grays (joined in 1903); pres. The Conelly Co.; member Cleve-land Real Estate Board; Athletic Club; trustee Cleveland Grays. Recreations: Horseback Exercise and Rifle...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Samuel McWilliams

McWilliams, Thomas Samuel; minister; born, Kentucky, Nov. 22, 1865; son of Samuel and Martha A. Harrington McWilliams; Centr. College, Danville, Ky., A. B., 1886, A. M., 1889, D. D., 1899; Danville Theological Seminary, 1886-1888; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1888-1889; married, Chillicothe, O., Dec. 5, 1887, Susan Probasco Nipgen; one son, John P. McWilliams; pastor First Presbyterian Church, Chillicothe, 0., 1889-1892; American Presbyterian Church, Montreal, Can., 1892-1902; pastor Calvary Presbyterian Church, Cleveland, since 1902; in 1911, chairman of committee that formed the Association of Federated Churches of Cleveland; pres. of Cleveland Peace Society, 1911, member Kappa Alpha Fraternity; member Mayfield, and Country Clubs. Golf favorite...

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Biographical Sketch of William R. Cox

William R. Cox, farmer; P. O. Hutton; was born in Bedford Co., Virginia, Feb. 25, 1832; when he was 16 years of age, his parents, Joel and Margaret Cox, moved to Ross Co., Ohio, living there eight years; they came to Coles Co. in 1856, and, three years afterward moved to Independence, Warren Co., where they died, his mother in 1874, and his father in March, 1876. While living in Ohio, Mr. Cox married Miss Hannah C. Thompson, April 28, 1853; she was a daughter of Nathan Thompson, who was a native of Virginia, and moved to Ross Co., Ohio, at an early day; he remained there three years; engaged in farming and milling, and in the year 1856, moved to Coles Co., Hutton Tp., and in September, 1870, purchased and moved upon his present farm on Secs. 22 and 23, containing 129 acres. For twelve years, before coming to his present home, he carried on the “Blakeman Flouring-Mill,” three and one-half miles southeast of Charleston in this county. Soon after the organization of the townships, he was elected Commissioner of Highways, serving three years; he was elected Supervisor in 1877,-for two terms. His wife was born Oct. 19, 1834; they had six children, five living – Emza H. (now Mrs. Fred. Cottingham), born June 28, 1854; Mary C. (now Mrs. Daniel Pipher), born March 9, 1856; Joel F.,...

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