Location: Rockingham County VA

Biography of John Cravens

John Cravens, son of Dr. Joseph and Mary Cravens, was born in Harrisonburg, Rockingham county, Virginia, October 28, 1797, where he was reared and educated. He began the study of medicine under his father,, when in his nineteenth year, and began practice some six years later. After practicing with his father two years, he removed to Hardy county, Virginia now West Virginia, and began practice at Petersburg, but only remained one year, when he removed to Pendleton county, opened an office in Franklin, the county seat, and was an active practitioner in that county for ten years. In 1837 he removed to Missouri, and settled near Miami, where he lived eighteen months, and during that time gave up the practice of his profession. At the expiration of the time mentioned he changed his place of residence to Daviess county, locating near Gallatin in the spring of 1839, where he pursued farming and continued the practice of his profession until 1850, then moved to Gallatin, and gave his attention exclusively to his increasing practice. In 1857 he returned to his farm, one mile northwest of Gallatin, where he now lives. He continued the practice of medicine until the close of the war, when owing to his advanced age and impaired hearing,. he gave up practice entirely, devoting his attention to his farm. In 1842 he was elected presiding justice of...

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Biography of John E. Bowcock

John E. Bowcock, attorney at law of St. Louis, has since 1911 been connected with the division of building inspection in this city, having studied and specialized in this branch of law, so that he has become a recognized expert in this branch of the profession. He came to this city from the Atlantic seaboard, his birth having occurred in McGaheysville, Rockingham county, Virginia, February 23, 1860. He is a son of the late Jesse L. Bowcock, a native of Virginia and of English lineage, the family having been founded in America prior to the Revolutionary war. He took up the occupation of farming and stock raising as a life work and at the time of the Civil war responded to the call of the Confederate army, which he joined as a private, serving with his command throughout the period of hostilities. He married Maggie E. Reppetoe, a native of Virginia and of French descent. Both have now passed away. Mrs. Bowcock died in 1902 at the age of fifty-two years, while the death of Mr. Bowcock occurred in 1912 when he had reached the age of seventy-six. Their family numbered five sons and a daughter. John E. Bowcock, the eldest of the six children, was educated in private schools of Virginia and spent his life to the age of twenty-two years on the home farm, his experiences being...

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Biography of George Mitchell

George Mitchell was the son of Rev. John Mitchell and his first wife, Catherine Margaret Teter. John Mitchell was born at Dawston, Lancashire, England, May 1, 1763, and came to America in 1774. He lived in Hampshire, Rockingham, and Harrison (later Lewis) counties, Virginia. He died April 29, 1840, and his tombstone is still standing in the old Harmony churchyard near Jane Lew, Lewis County, West Virginia, where he had “preached the Gospel forty years.” This John Mitchell, Mrs. Guernsey’s greatgrandfather, according to the records in the War Department and Pension Office, served as a private in the Virginia militia and also in Capt. James Pendleton’s eompany, First Continental Artillery. He was in battle at Petersburg and was present at the siege and surrender of Yorktown. On her father’s side Mrs. Guernsey is also descended from the Rev. Anthony Jacob Henkel, who came to this country in 1717 as one of the founders of the Lutheran Church in America. He settled in Pennsylvania and became pastor of the church at Faulkaer’s Swamp, the oldest existing Lutheran Church in the United States. Mrs. Guernsey’s ancestors on her mother’s side were pioneers in the early settlement of Maryland and Western Pennsylvania, and in addition to the Rev. John Mitchell, the following are among Mrs. Guernsey’s Revolutionary ancestors: George Teter from Virginis, Patrick McCann from Maryland, Anthony Altman, Christopher and John Harrold...

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Biography of Jacob C. Garber

The efficient and capable postmaster of Grangeville, Jacob C. Garber, is a native of Rockingham County, Virginia, born near Fort Republic, January 7, 1829. The family is of Swiss origin and the ancestors of our subject crossed the Atlantic to the New World prior to the Revolutionary war. They were long residents of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and in religious faith were Dunkards. Martin Garber, the father of our subject, was born in the Old Dominion and married Miss Magdalen Mohler, a lady of German lineage and a representative of one of the old Virginian families. Fourteen children were born of this union, of whom eight sons and three daughters grew to years of maturity. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died of palsy, in the fifty-fourth year of his age. His wife attained a very advanced age and finally met death by accident, in the upsetting of a stagecoach in which she was a passenger. Jacob C. Garber, their fourth child, was educated in Virginia and Ohio, the family having removed to the latter state when he was fourteen years of age. Subsequently he emigrated with an older brother to Iowa, and in 1854 he sailed from New York to California, going by way of the Nicaragua route to San Francisco, where he arrived on the 13th of August. He then engaged in mining in Sierra and...

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Biography of Samuel Bowman

Samuel Bowman, now of Coffeyville, where he is engaged in the real estate, insurance and loan business with his sons, is a Kansas resident of nearly thirty-five years and was long prominent in Labette County, where he served two terms as probate judge. His Bowman ancestors were German people who came to Pennsylvania in Colonial times. His grandfather, Benjamin Bowman, a native of Pennsylvania, was a farmer and cabinet maker, also a minister of the Dunkard Church, and spent many years in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, where he died some years before Judge Bowman was born. It was in the valley of the Shenandoah, a mile from Harrisonburg, Virginia, that Samuel Bowman was born May 18, 1846. His father, John Bowman, was born in the same locality in 1790, and spent his life in that famous valley, engaged in farming and stock raising. He died at Harrisonburg in 1873. Though a resident of Virginia he was not in sympathy with the South on the issue of slavery, was a stanch Union man, and a whig and republican in politics. He was an active member of the Dunkard Church. John Bowman married Rebecca Wine, who was born in the Shenandoah Valley in 1802, and died on the old farm near Harrisonburg in 1872. A brief record of the children is as follows: Daniel, who was a Virginia farmer and...

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Biography of Paul Stafford Mitchell, M. D.

Paul Stafford Mitchell, M. D. Incomplete indeed would be any history of Kansas which did not include distinctive mention of that large body of men who labor in the broad field of medical service. Some have chosen a particular path and some have chosen to work under a particular combination of methods, but all can be justly credited with scientific knowledge and a due regard for the preservation of the public health. To the profession of medicine, Dr. Paul Stafford Mitchell devoted the early years of his manhood, and today, after seventeen years of successful practice, stands as a representative of all that is best and highest in his line of human endeavor, and is justly accounted one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Iola. Doctor Mitchell was born at Cherry Grove, Rockingham County, Virginia, November 11, 1875, and is a son of Dr. Jacob A. and Emily (Furr) Mitchell. His father, born in 1807, at Londonderry, Ireland, ran away from home when still a lad and emigrated to the United States, and here completed a medical education and began the practice of his calling near Washington, Rappahannock County, Virginia. There he was married and subsequently went to Rockingham County, Virginia. He was successful as a practitioner and was in fairly good circumstances when the Civil war came on, but was an ardent Confederate sympathizer, put all his...

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Biographical Sketch of V. R. Bridges, M. D.

V. R. Bridges, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born in Rockingham Co., Va., June 4, 1832; his father settled in Ross Co., Ohio, near Chillicothe, in 1836; in 1841, he came to Illinois and settled in Newton, Jasper Co.; he was engaged in contracting on public works, both in Ohio and Illinois. Dr. Bridges acquired a good academic education, mainly through his own exertions, and at the age of 14, began life for himself. At the age of 17, he taught his first school; in 1851, he was employed in the drug store of Dr. H. H. Hayes, at Lawrenceville, Ill., and began the study of medicine under him. He next came to Marshall, and completed his studies under Drs. Payne and Duncan. In the spring of 1854, he located in Salisbury, Coles Co., and began the practice of his profession. In 1860, he came to Mattoon, his present residence. He entered the U. S. service as Assistant Surgeon of the 62d Regiment, I. V. I; in 1863, he was promoted to be Surgeon of the 126th Regiment, and was mustered out in 1865, after the close of the war; soon after his discharge from the service, he was appointed Examining Surgeon for the Pension Bureau-a position he still holds. In 1876, he attended Rush Medical College, from which he graduated Feb. 27, 1877. He was married...

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Biographical Sketch of Madison H. Bear

Madison H. Bear a farmer and dairyman near Newport, was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, December 6, 1841, the fifth child in a family of eight children of David and Maria (Anderson) Bear. Was educated in Harrisonburg and also worked upon his father’s farm until he was twenty-seven years of age, when he married Miss Cornelia Firebaugh, of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and a daughter of John and Ella (McCutchen) Firebaugh. Mr. Bear then bought 120 acres of land four miles west of Harrisonburg and managed a farm there four years; selling out then, he came, in November, 1873, to California, rented land two years and then purchased the tract which he now occupies, half a mile east of Newport. For some years past he has been very successful in the dairy business. Politically he is an earnest and intelligent supporter of the Democratic party. He served as a soldier in the Confederate army, was captured in the Wilderness May 10, 1864, and held as a prisoner at Fort Delaware until the close of the war. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which for fourteen years he has held the office of elder. He has the following named children: Ernest C., Lena K., Irene E. and David...

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Biographical Sketch of J. H. Brannon

J. H. Brannon, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Oakland; born in Rockingham Co. Va., Sept. 1, 1836, where he engaged in farming until 19 years of age, when, in 1855, he emigrated to Missouri, where his father died soon after his arrival, when he returned to Virginia, remitting during the winter, and, in the spring of 1856, he returned to Illinois, and located in Oakland Tp., Coles Co., and engaged in farming, which business he has since successfully followed; he owns 200 acres of land, mostly under cultivation. His marriage with Sally A. Troxwell was celebrated Nov. 11, 1858; she was born in Coles Co., her parents being among the early pioneers of this county, settling here at an early day; they have eight children by this union-Winfield, Edward, Clara, Semantha H., John W., Hiram L., Franklin and Minnie...

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Biographical Sketch of Anthony, A.J.

A. J. Anthony, stock-raiser, first came to Lawrence in 1857, and engaged in staging until 1863; he then became conductor and express messenger on the Southern Overland Stage Line from Kansas City, Mo., to Santa Fe, N. M., until August, 1867. He then located at a ranch twenty miles west of Dodge City, where he kept a few cattle and a provision store. A year thence he moved to Fort Dodge and engaged in the sutler business until 1874, when he located on a stock-ranch three-fourths of a mile west of where Dodge City now stands, where he has been engaged in the livestock business. He has now about 500 head of cattle. He was born in Goochland County, East Virginia, and July 23, 1830, where he lived two years; then moved to Rockingham County, Central Virginia, where he lived twenty-one years, and then went to Ohio and followed agricultural pursuits until he came to Kansas, which was in 1857. He was married in 1872 to Mrs. Calvina Chambliss (Hagaman), of St. Louis, a native of Louisiana. They have had five children, of who three is dead William W. And Herman Ray is living. He assisted in organizing Ford County and Dodge City, and was the first County Treasurer, and has served three terms as County Commissioner of Ford County,...

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Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah C. Cravens

This gentleman was born in Saline county, Missouri, February 18th, 1838. He is a son of Dr. John Cravens, who for many years was the peer of the finest physicians and surgeons of the State. They are of Virginia ancestry, Jeremiah’s grandfather, Dr. Joseph Cravens, being for many years a leading physician of Rockingham county, Virginia. Jeremiah C. graduated from the Missouri State University in the class of 1860, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The civil war breaking out soon after leaving school, he cast his lot with the fortunes of the Confederacy, and followed its flag until its brilliant star set forever at Appomattox. He was promoted by Gen. Slack to the position of aid-de-camp, to rank as lieutenentcolonel. He was at the battle of Pea Ridge, in March, 1862, by the side of General Slack, when that gentleman fell mortally wounded. After the battle he went with the army to Corinth, Mississippi, and shortly after the evacuation of that place, he returned to Missouri, with Col. Hughes, and participated in the battles of Independence and Lone Jack. At the last named engagement, Lieut. Colonel Cravens commanded a company of recruits who fought desperately upon that sanguinary field. After the battle he was chosen captain and served with his company in the 6th Missouri Cavalry, under Generals Marmaduke and Shelby, until the war closed. He then...

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