Location: Rockingham County NH

Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent,...

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Manchester New Hampshire Directories 1840-1965

19 free digitized directories found online for the city of Manchester New Hampshire covering the years of 1860-1918 (incomplete). Directories can provide such information on an individual such as their employment and address during the year issued. They may also indicate whether they were renting or residing with somebody else at the time.

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Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and saw what they had for supper that night. They however did not discover themselves till the second day after. They probably wished to take a little time to learn the strength and preparation of the inhabitants. The next day, Mrs. M’Coy, attended by their two dogs, went down to see if any of the other families had returned from the garrison. She found no one. On her return, as...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

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Early Probate Records of Hampton, N.H.

The early probate records of the Province of New Hampshire, from 1635 to 1771, have been published in nine volumes (vols. 31-39) of the set “New Hampshire State Papers” edited by Albert Stillman Batchellor, Henry Harrison Metcalf, and Otis G. Hammond. Originally published in the years 1907-1941 these books are available in many libraries throughout New Hampshire. Alphabetical list of probate records Abourn, George 1654 Blake, Timothy 1715 Boulter, John 1703 Boulter, Nathaniel 1695 Chapman, John 1705/6 Chase, James 1703/4 Chase, Thomas 1652 Cole, William 1662 Cotton, Seaborn 1684 Cram, Jonathan 1703/4 Cuddington, Stockdale 1650 Dalton, Philemon 1656 Dalton, Ruth (Leet) 1665 Dalton, Timothy 1657 Dalton, Timothy 1662 Dearborn, Godfrey 1680 Dow, Henry 1659 Dow, Joseph 1703 Drake, Abraham 1714 Drake, Robert 1663 Dudley, Samuel 1682/3 Eastow, William 1655 Elkins, Henry 1667 Fifield, Benjamin 1706 Fogg, Samuel 1671/2 Garland, John 1671 Godfrey, William 1667 Hilliard, Emanuel 1657 Hobbs, James 1680 Hobbs, Morris 1706 Huggins, John 1670 Hunkitt, John 1670/1 Johnson, Edmund 1651 Knowles, John 1693/4 Knowles, John 1733 Leavitt, Hezron 1702/3 Leavitt, Isabel (Bland) 1698/9 Leavitt, Thomas 1692 Locke, John 1707 Marston, James 1705 Mingay, Jeffrey 1658 Moulton, John 1649/50 Moulton, John 1706/7 Moulton, William 1663/4 Page, Francis 1706 Page, Francis 1755 Page, Robert 1679 Page, Thomas 1686 Palmer, Christopher 1706/7 Philbrick, Thomas 1663/4 Read, Robert 1664 Shaw, Roger 1660 Smith, Israel 1706 Stockbridge, John 1715 Swaine, Francis 1665...

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Biographical Sketch of David Sargent

David Sargent, a well-known farmer and cattle dealer of Dunbarton, Merrimack County, N.H., was born in this town in 1833, son of Eliphalet R. and Lydia (Wells) Sargent. His paternal grandfather, Thomas, was a native of Goffstown, N.H., in which place, also, he died. He was a farmer by occupation. Eliphalet R. Sargent was born in Goffstown, Hillsborough County, N.H. He acquired a common-school education in his native town, after which he engaged in farming during the rest of his active life. In politics he was a Republican; and he served as Selectman and as Representative to the legislature two years, besides filling other Lydia Wells Sargent, reared nine children. Mr. Sargent died at the age of eighty-two years. David Sargent, who was the next to the youngest of his parents’ four sons, was educated in the schools of Dunbarton and Derry, N.H. He then went to work on the farm, where he still remains. His enterprising spirit has led him to engage in the manufacture of lumber, and he has also dealt extensively in cattle. Some time ago he made a tour through the West, visiting Salt Lake City and many other important places, including some in California. Mr. Sargent married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Mehitable (Smith) Woodburn, of Londonderry, N.H.; and they have reared five children, namely: Fred D. Sargent, born February 5, 1858; Mary...

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Biography of James Madison Jones

James Madison Jones, the popular and efficient station agent of the Concord & Montreal Railroad at Concord, was born at Deerfield, N.H., April 26, 1833, son of James and Hannah L. (Marston) Jones. Jacob Jones, his grandfather, a native of Pittsfield, N.H., kept a successful clock and gunsmith shop in his native town for many years. He had a high local reputation as a mechanic, and he lived to a good old age. James Jones, who was born in Pittsfield, N.H., inherited his father’s mechanical talent. He took up and continued the paternal business of making and repairing clocks and executing gunsmith work, adding thereto that of a blacksmith. In the latter half of his life he removed to Concord, where he entered the employ of Abiel Chandler, the clock-maker, and soon established for himself a great local reputation in that city for skill in his line of business. He could repair any sort of machine or mechanical instrument. His useful life closed in Concord, at the age of seventy-eight years. He married Hannah L. Marston, of Pittsfield. Their family consisted of the following children: James Madison, the subject of this sketch; Thomas A., who went to Chicago, Ill., and was appointed paymaster on the Chicago & North-western Railroad; Charles E., who is an engineer on the Boston & Maine Railroad; George A., who enlisted for service in the...

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Biography of Elbridge G. Little

Elbridge G. Little was born August 5, 1807. He obtained his preliminary education at Exeter, N.H., and graduated from the Medical College at Cleveland, Ohio. He attained eminence in his profession, and in New Lisbon, Wis., where his last years were passed, he was one of the wealthiest and most prominent citizens. His wife, who was born November 4, 1809, was a daughter of Thomas and Judith (Dodge) Peabody, of the part of old Danvers, Mass., now known as Peabody. She was a sister of George Peabody, the wealthy and benevolent banker, who died in London, and who bequeathed to her son, George Peabody Little, a portion of his vast wealth. Six children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Little, George P.; Allen F., who was born August 12, 1838; and Henry C., who was born March 31, 1842. George Peabody Little was educated in the academy in Lewiston, N.Y., Pembroke Academy of Pembroke, N.H., and the gymnasium and military institute here, a branch of the Norwich Military Academy of Vermont. He taught school for one term in Pembroke, N.H., when he was eighteen years old, and the following year went to Portland, Me., where he was engaged in mercantile business some six years. The ten years ensuing he managed a photograph studio at Palmyra, N.Y., having taken a fancy to chemicals and cameras. Returning then to Pembroke, N.H.,...

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Biography of George Oliver Locke

George Oliver Locke, of Pembroke, an ex-member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, was born in South New Market, N.H., September 19, 1826, son of Simeon and Clarissa (Tash) Locke. His great-grand-father, David Locke, who was a native of Yorkshire, England, became an early settler in Rye, N.H., where he owned a good farm, and resided there until his death, which occurred at a good old age. Simeon Locke (first), grandfather of the subject of this sketch, followed farming in Epsom for a time. Later he moved to East Concord, N.H., and there spent the rest of his life. His habits of thrift and industry enabled him to acquire considerable property. In politics he voted with the Democratic party, but his retiring disposition would not permit him to take any active part in public affairs. He attended the Congregational church. At his death he was seventy-nine years old. He married Abigail Blake, a Epsom, who attained the age of seventy-three, and was the mother of nine children. Of these the third, Simeon Locke (second), was born in East Concord. He settled in South New Market, and there followed his calling of mechanic for the rest of his active period. He was an able business man as well as a good mechanic, and by making proper use of his opportunities he realized excellent financial results. He was a Democrat...

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Biography of James S. Elkins

James S. Elkins, a prominent citizen of Canterbury, N.H., was born in Rye, N.H., December 24, 1809, son of James and Mehitable (Rand) Elkins. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Elkins, was a native of Rye, where he was engaged in agriculture during the active period of his life. James Elkins was a farmer and fisherman, following the first-named occupation in Rye, where he was born May 3, 1777. He died in Canterbury, November 29, 1855. His wife, Mehitable Rand Elkins, was born in Rye, June 19, 1787, and died in Canterbury, July 20, 1859. James S., the subject of this sketch; David, born November 4, 1812, and now deceased; and Moses, born February 21, 1814, who died September 20, 1889. James S. Elkins received his education in the public schools of his native town. He remained at home, and helped on the farm until he was twenty years of age. His parents removed to Little Boar’s Head and then to Stratham, N.H., remaining four years in each place. In 1834 they moved to Canterbury. He was engaged in stone-cutting in Quincy, Gloucester, and Boston, where he helped build the First Merchants’ Exchange. In 1834 he bought a farm near the village of Canterbury. About 1873 he purchased the property where he now resides, and where for the last twenty years he has lived retired from business. In politics Mr. Elkins...

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Biography of Hosea Ballou Carter

Hosea Ballou Carter, son of Susan Shannon (Merrick) Carter and Tappan Sargent Carter, was born at East Hampstead, Rockingham County, N.H., on September 5, 1834. He was educated in the public schools of Hampstead and at Atkinson Academy, where he was a classmate of General William Cogswell, of Bradford, Mass., and later of Salem, Mass. The intrinsic inwardness of modern political and legislative contests has drawn to the service of political managers and corporate magnates the sagacity, shrewdness, and fidelity of a peculiar class of men, not infrequently found in New England, especially in New Hampshire, who, being of humble or obscure origin, finding themselves unable to demonstrate or promulgate their ideas, inventions, and schemes (not possessing the capital required therefor), enter the line of service indicated for the twofold purpose of compensation and education. The subject of this sketch, born and reared among the granite hills of New Hampshire, is an exponent of what an uncultured bucolic lad from the backwoods may accomplish when sustained by an equitable supply of sand tempered with ironic silence and commonplace courtesy. At the age of ten years he had learned the trade of shoemaking to aid his father in furnishing the meagre comforts of the humble home of that industrious New England mechanic, who has for more than threescore years daily continued to toil at the work-bench, and who now, at...

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