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Location: Rockingham County NC

Assassination of John Walter Stephens

The year 1870 is one of the years that will go down in history as one of great social and political significance, and it well marks the culmination and the decline of the Ku Klux organization. Never before, nor perhaps since, was there a time when prejudice and feeling, intermingled with crime, ran so rampant along social and political lines. It was a time when the Negro, or the white man who took any part with the Negro in politics, on hearing after Nightfall the clattering of horses’ feet or the loud tap on his door, would feel his blood run cold in his veins for fear there was a raid on foot and perchance he might be the victim. John Walter Stephens was born October 14, 1834, in Guilford County, N. C. His parents were good people, comfortably situated on a farm, and were consistent members of the Methodist church. His father died when he was about 18 years of age, leaving a wife, four sons and two daughters. Walter, with his brothers, lived on the farm and supported the family. A few years later he learned to make harness, and went into the harness business. His education was of a very ordinary sort, for he had only the advantages of the common schools. He studied a great deal at home, however. When he grew into more matured...

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Slave Narrative of Charles Lee Dalton

Interviewer: Miss Nancy Woodburn Watkins Person Interviewed: Charles Lee Dalton Location: Madison, North Carolina Age: 93 Ex-Slave Biography–Charles Lee Dalton, 93. In July, 1934, the census taker went to the home of Unka Challilee Dalton and found that soft talking old darky on the porch of his several roomed house, a few hundred feet south of the dirt road locally called the Ayersville road because it branches from the hard surfaced highway to Mayodan at Anderson Scales’ store, a short distance from Unka Challilie’s. Black got its meaning from his face, even his lips were black, but his hair was whitening. His lean body was reclining while the white cased pillows of his night bed sunned on a chair. His granddaughter kept house for him the census taker learned. Unka Challilie said: “I’se got so I ain’t no count fuh nuthin. I wuz uh takin’ me a nap uh sleepin’ (‘ AM). Dem merry-go-wheels keep up sich a racket all nite, sech a racket all nite, ah cyan’t sleep.” This disturbance was “The Red Wolfe Medicine Troop of Players and Wheels” near Anderson Scales’ store in the forks of the Mayodan and the Ayresville roads. In 1937 in the home of his son, Unka Challilie ninety-three, told the cause of his no “countness.” “I wuz clean-up man in de mill in Mayodan ontill three years ago, I got too...

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Biography of Rev. Ira W. King

Rev. Ira W. King, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a prominent citizen of Alexandria, was born December 3, 1819, in North Carolina. He is the fourth of eight children born to Prof. Tho. H. And Ann (Harris) King. The father was a native of Virginia, born about 1790, of Scotch-Irish descent, a son of Henry King, also a native of Virginia. Tho. H. was reared and liberally educated in his native State. He went to Rockingham County, N. C., when a young man, where he married about 1810. In 1820 he moved to Williamson County, Tenn., and in 1832 located in Smith County. A few years prior to his death he went to Jackson County. He died in 1865. Many years of his early life were spent as a schoolteacher in North Carolina and Tennessee. He served as deputy sheriff and captain of militia for several years. The latter portion of his life was devoted to agricultural pursuits. His wife was born in North Carolina about the same year of his birth and died in 1873, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject was mostly educated at Castalian Springs, Sumner County, and at Lebanon, where he married in June 1843, Miss Deborah, daughter of Jackson N. and Elizabeth (Whitson) Brown. Of the ten children born to this union, four are living: Dr. Robt. W., of...

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Biography of Capt. Samuel W. Greer

CAPT. SAMUEL W. GREER. Industry, frugality and honesty were the main principles instilled into the lives of their children by the parents of Capt. Samuel W. Greer. Who can doubt but these principles, which have been adopted by Mr. Greer throughout his career, have had much to do with his success? He was born in Rockingham County, N. C., July 28, 1828. The son of John and Mary Jane (Brown) Greer, natives also of the Old North State. The mother died in that State when our subject was but a boy and the father afterward married Miss Parthenia Tuer. In 1849 they moved to Smith County, Tennessee, and from there to Missouri in 1859, locating in Oregon County. There the father died in 1867 when about fifty-nine years of age. He was a very successful farmer and bought the land which Capt. Greer now owns, near Alton. Mr. Greer was a member of the Methodist Church and was a class leader as far back as our subject can remember. He was a Mason, a member of blue lodge, and in politics a Whig at first, and later a Democrat. His father, Truman Greer, was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in North Carolina. By his first marriage John Greer became the father of eight children, two sons and six daughters,...

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Biography of James W. Reid

Idaho has won distinction for the high rank of her bench and bar. Perhaps none of the newer states can justly boast of abler jurists or attorneys. Some of them have been men of national fame, and among those whose lives have been passed on a quieter plane there is scarcely a town or city in the state but can boast of one or more lawyers capable of crossing swords in forensic combat with any of the distinguished legal lights of the United States. Idaho certainly has reason to be proud of her legal fraternity. In James W. Reid we find united many of the rare qualities which go to make up the successful lawyer, and he is today regarded as one of the most prominent representatives of the bar of the state. He possesses perhaps few of those dazzling, meteoric qualities which have sometimes flashed along the legal horizon, riveting the gaze and blinding the vision for the moment, then disappearing, leaving little or no trace behind: but he has, rather, those solid and more substantial qualities which shine with a constant luster, shedding light in the dark places with steadiness and continuity. He has in an eminent degree that rare ability of saying in a convincing way the right thing at the right time. His mind is analytical, logical and inductive, and with a thorough and comprehensive...

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Roy Andrew Hooker

Private., Inf., Co. E, 119th Regt. Inf., 30th Div.; of Stoneville, N.C.; son of G. R. and Mrs. R. A. Hooker. Entered service Sept. 1, 1917, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred to Ft. Jay, N. Y., then to Des Moines, Iowa. Now at Douglas, Arizona. Mrs. Hooker has sent three sons to fight for USA, one in navy two in the...

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Hugh W. White

Private, San. Co., 30th Div. Born in Rockingham County; the son of S. N. and Mrs. M. A. White. Entered service June 19, 1916, at Reidsville, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., transferred to Camp Merritt. Went to France May 13, 1918. Fought at Ypres. Transferred to 2nd Army Corps Hdqrs. On Mexican border from October, 1916, until March, 1917. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 7,...

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Allen J. Smith

Private 1st Class, M. P., Co. A, 81st Div., 306th Regt.; of Rockingham County; son of F. B. and Mrs. Lena Smith. Entered service Sept. 5, 1917, at Rockingham, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and then transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., July 29,...

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Robert H. Stone

First Sgt., Inf., Co. 8, 2nd Reg., T. R. B. N. Born in Rockingham County, Dec. 7, 1896; son of R. T. and Mary Stone. Entered service August 26, 1918, at Stoneville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., then to Camp Sevier, S. C. Promoted to rank of Corpl. Oct. 1, 1918; Sgt., Dec. 26, 1918. Promoted to rank of Supply Sgt., Dec. 27, 1918. Promoted to rank of First Sgt., Feb. 4, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 25,...

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S. L. Martin, Jr.

Sergt., Med. Corps, 319th Amb. Co., Div. 80th, Regt. 305th, San. Tr. Born in Rockingham County Nov. 12, 1893; son of S. L. Martin, Sr., and Mrs. Reaves John Martin. Entered service Nov. 15, 1917, at Leaksville, N.C. Sent to Camp Lee, Va. Sailed for France May 28, 1918. Promoted to Sergt. September, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel. Returned to USA June 20, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Dix, N. J., June 28,...

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Adolphus E. Martin

Private M. G. Btn., Co. D, 57th, 19th Div.; of Rockingham County; son of J. B. and Mrs. Fannie Martin. Entered service July 24, 1918, at High Point, N.C. Sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. Transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa. Mustered out at Camp Wadsworth, S. C., Feb. 7,...

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Grover Monroe Hooker

Gunner’s Mate, 1st Class. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Fannie B. Hooker. Entered service December 7, 1915, at El Paso, Texas. Went to training station, San Francisco, Cal. On the U. S. S. Maryland, U. S. S. South Dakota, U. S. Naval Base 17 and 18, U. S. S. Eagle 56, R. S. Portsmouth, N. H. Three trips on convoy. Was stationed overseas one year. Stationed around South American coast 11 months. Prior to enlistment in Navy, served in the U. S. Army, stationed at the Philippines, September 24, 1912, to September 16, 1914. Mustered out December 15, 1919, U. S. R. Ship, Portsmouth, N....

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George R. Hooker

1st Class Private, Co. B, 42nd Div., 117th T. H. and M. P. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Ollie Stafford Hooker. Entered service April 24, 1917, at Lynchburg, Va. Was sent to Ft. Monroe, Va.; transferred to Camp Elberta, Ill., then to Long Island, N. Y. Sent overseas Jan. 23, 1918; landed Feb. 2, 1918. Operations in Loneville Sector, in Baccerest, St. Clement, Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne Marne Offensive, St. Mihiel; operations between Meuse and Mozelle, Meuse-Argonne offensive; was through Germany four months. Two citations; gold chevrons Jan. 23, 1919. Landed in USA April 25, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Meade, Md., May 15,...

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A. L. Gammon

Water Tender (Navy); of Rockingham County; son of B. F. and Mrs. Elizabeth Gammon. Entered service Feb. 12, 1917, at Richmond, Va. Sent to Hampton Roads, Va.; transferred to battleship “New Hampshire;” six trips across on battleship “New Hampshire.” Served on board same ship until discharged. Mustered out at Hampton Roads, Va., Aug. 21,...

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Clyde H. Gentry

Private., Batry. E, 81st Div., 317th F. Artly.; son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Gentry; of Rockingham County. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Madison, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 8,...

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