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Location: Rochester New York

Betsey Sylinda Todd Packard of Rochester NY

PACKARD, Betsey Sylinda Todd8, (John7, Daniel6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 17, 1836, in Rodman, N. Y., married July 4, 1852, Dr. Morgan D. Packard. She is now (1913) living at 529 Parsells Ave., Rochester, N. Y. Children: I. Dianna Nancy, b. May 18, 1853, d. Dec. 19, 1912, m. Caton Crandall and had issue: (1) Ella May, b. July 4, 1855, and m. Warren Standish; she and her infant son died in 1881 and were buried in the same grave. II. Myrtie...

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Henry Perine Todd of Rochester NY

Henry Perine Todd8, (Caleb7, Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 22, 1839, died June 14, 1911, married June 18, 1879, Mary Stone, daughter of Timothy Marther and Elizabeth Ann (Swain) Todd, who was born Dec. 9, 1844. She is now (1913) living in Rochester, N. Y. For her ancestry see No. 582. Mr. Todd was born in Marcellus, Onondaga County, N. Y., where his father was a farmer at one time. When he was about ten years of age, the family moved to Dewitt, Onondaga County, N. Y. He attended the Academy at Moravia, N. Y. In July, 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, he enlisted at Syracuse, N. Y., and became a member of Company B., 3rd New York Cavalry, and saw much hard service until early in 1862, when he was discharged for physical disability. He survived the very severe illness incurred in the service, however, and after the war moved with his parents to Spencerport, Monroe County, N. Y., where they purchased a farm. There he lived until 1908, when he retired and moved to Rochester, N. Y. At the time of her marriage, Mrs. Todd was a teacher of music in a private academy in Haddonfield, Penn. Her home was in Fayetteville, N. Y. She was born in Manlius, Onondaga County, N. Y., her father owning and operating “Todd’s Mill” at...

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Biography of Frank B. DeVine

No history of Riverside purporting to record her growth and prosperity can lay claim to real value and interest that does not award the merit to her mercantile enterprises, and the men who have conducted them. Most prominent in this record would be the names of Boyd & DeVine, commission merchants and jobbers, whose establishment is located on the corner of Eighth Street and Pachappa Avenue. This is one of the most important wholesale and commission houses in the city, dealing extensively in groceries, grain, honey, etc. They are also large fruit and raisin packers, placing their products on the markets under the celebrated “Sunbeam” brand. Their packing business was first established by the German Fruit Company, who sold out their interest to Boyd & DeVine in May 1887. The few brief facts gathered regarding Mr. DeVine’s career previous to locating in Riverside are of interest. He was born and reared in Rochester, New York, dating his birth in 1848, had the advantages of a good schooling, and graduated at the high school of that city with honor. He then entered into mercantile life as a clerk and bookkeeper, in the well-known establishment of Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & Co., of his native city. In 1870 he went to New York City, and for the next twelve years was engaged in mercantile pursuits, holding responsible positions in some of the...

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Biography of Barnabas Tibbals

Barnabas Tibbals, owner of a fine orange grove in Brockton Square, on the south side of Bandini Avenue, about two miles south of Riverside, purchased this place in August, 1887 and immediately commenced his horticultural pursuits. At this writing his land, consisting of ten acres, is all in orange trees, except a few deciduous trees and table grapes. About one-half of his trees are seedlings, and the rest Washington Navels. He has spent much labor in pruning, fertilizing and cultivating, since buying the place, and has now a very productive grove. The improvements on the place consist of a commodious two-story residence surrounded with ornamental trees and flowers, and substantial outbuildings. Mr. Tibbals was born near Rochester, Monroe County, New York, in 1824. He was the son of Lewis and Betsey (King) Tibbals. His father was born in Cayuga County, New York, and his mother was a native of Suffield, Massachusetts. In 1826 Mr. Tibbals’ parents moved to Michigan, and located on what afterward became the township of Avon, Oakland County. They were, among the earliest pioneers of that section, the country at that date being wild and uninhabited except by roving tribes of Indians. The subject of this sketch spent his early youth and young manhood in hard labor upon their pioneer farm, deprived of all schooling except such as could be obtained in the pioneer schools of...

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Biographical Sketch of R. B. F. Watrons

R. B. F. Watrons. – No man in Redlands is more worthy of mention in a work of this kind than is B. F. Watrons, M. D. He came to Redlands with $350, with which he bought a team and went to work. He had previously contracted for ten acres of land for $1,000, and had paid $250 down. He began improving it the second year and put up a $400 house. He afterward bought ten acres more for $1,500 and borrowed money for the first payment. In five years he had bought and paid for thirty-one acres in Redlands and twenty in San Diego County. Since then he has bought and sold in this and also in San Diego County, and is recognized as one of Redlands most enterprising and prosperous citizens. He was born in Cortland County, New York. He received his literary education at Homer Academy and his medical education at the Pennsylvania University, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1870. He at once commenced the practice of medicine in Ithaca, where he remained six years; he then went to Rochester, where he remained two years. Then he went to Brodhead, Wisconsin, and from that place came to California. Dr. Watrons was Second Sergeant in the Seventy-sixth Regiment New York Volunteers, and rendered his country good service at the battles of Fredericksburg, South Mountain,...

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Biography of Ebenezer Griffin Brown

Ebenezer Griffin Brown (“Judge Brown,” as he is familiarly known) is one of Riverside’s well-known pioneers. He was one of the original members of the Southern California Colony Association, and with the late Dr. Greves visited the lands now occupied by the city June, 1870, the first members of the association on the grounds. From the very first he was the strongest advocate in demanding the purchase by the association of these lands. His persistency was of little avail at first, but he was in earnest, and when Judge North, the president of the company, refused to act in accordance with his wishes, the judge returned to his home in Iowa and set about forming another colony association, with the express view of purchasing the Riverside lands. This move hastened the actions of the old association, and in September, 1870, the purchase was made and the colony established. That being the result desired by the Judge, he abandoned all further proceedings, never intending or desiring a rival to Riverside. He then settled his affairs in Iowa, and in May 1871, established himself and family in the new colony. He located upon Government land in sections 13 and 24, securing 104 acres lying one-half mile north and east of the Riverside town site on Colton Avenue. His means were limited, but he commenced his new life and pursuits with that...

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Biographical Sketch of R. J. A. Mack

R. J. A. Mack, of Redlands, is a native of Syracuse, New York, born June 24, 1842. He received his education in the schools of Syracuse and Fulton, New York, and commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Townsend, of Syracuse; he also attended and graduated at the college at Geneva. He began practice at Syracuse, afterward continuing at Rochester, and later at Lyons, New York. Thence he removed to Chicago, where he attended Bennett Medical College (Eclectic), graduating in 1876. He practiced in Chicago until 1886, when he removed to California, and on the 9th of November of that year settled in Redlands; being one of the Chicago colonies that located here. He conducted the Prospect House a year and a half, practicing also at the time. He then built his present handsome residence, on a tract of one and a half acres which he purchased. He has 40,000 orange seedbed stock, 2,000 of last year’s buds and 6,000 of this year’s buds, on his home place. He also has ten acres of land in the Crafton District, part of which is already planted to oranges, and the remainder will be in 1890. Dr. Mack was married November 26, 1876, to Annetta Bishop, a native of New York City. They have three children living, viz.: John A., Jr.; Roy A. and Raymond. One is deceased, Grace, aged seven...

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Biographical Sketch of Bernard Borgman

Bernard Borgman, president and treasurer of the Vance Boiler Works of Geneva, New York, owes his present high position in the community, and his present prosperity entirely to his own efforts, rising from the ranks by dint of earnest and unremitting toil and energy. (I) Bernard Borgman, father of the present Bernard Borgman, was born in Germany, and died in America, 1896. He came to this country at the age of eighteen years and lived for one year in Albany, New York. He then removed to Rochester, where he was employed as a car builder in the Rochester Car Shops, his trade having been originally that of carpentry. He married in Germany, Christina Evercamp, who came to America at the same time that he did, and who died in...

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Biographical Sketch of Bernard Borgman

(II) Bernard (2) Borgman, subject of this sketch, was born in Rochester, New York, September, 1854. His elementary education was received in the schools of his native city, and he then attended those of Yates county, New York. He had learned the cabinet-maker’s trade, and at the age of twenty-five years he made his first business venture, establishing himself in the furniture and undertaking line in Penn Yan, Yates county, New York. For nine years he conducted this business successfully, then sold his interest in the concern to his partner and established himself in the same manner, but independently, in Geneva, New York, where he soon attained the first rank in this business. He continued this until 1905, when he sold it advantageously and became connected with the Vance Boiler Works. His first step was to reorganize the company and he is now (1910) the principal stockholder as well as president and treasurer; T. A. Kam is the vice-president, and Charles H. Sweeney is the secretary. The factory has been equipped with the latest improvements and the transactions show an annual increase. There is an average of fifty men employed in the manufacture of steam and hot water boilers, marine and stationary engines, tanks, smoke stacks and all kinds of sheet iron equipments. Mr. Borgman has amassed considerable wealth and is the owner of two fine farms in Yates...

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Biography of Patrick Henry Leahy

Patrick Henry Leahy, who is clerk of and counsel for the board of supervisors of Ontario county, New York, in addition to attending to his large legal practice, is a fine example of what may be achieved by earnest and unremitting striving, when heavily handicapped by adverse circumstances. He owes his present high standing in his profession and in the community entirely to his own unaided efforts, and his inflexible and unfaltering courage in every relation of life have won for him the respect and confidence of all with whom he has come in contact. Judging from the success which has attended his labors in the past, a most brilliant future apparently lies before him. John Leahy, his father, was born in Castle Island, Ireland, in 1833, and died in this country in April, 1873. He had labored diligently as a workman all his life, deeming no work too humble, as long as it was honorable. During the civil war he enlisted in 1862, served as a private in Company E, One Hundred and Sixtieth New York Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered out with honor at the close of the war. His untimely death left his little family unprovided for. Patrick Henry Leahy was born in a log cabin in Canadice, Ontario county, New York, June 21, 1873. He was educated in the public schools of this county, and...

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Biography of Rev. James T. Dougherty

When De Nonville and his French army, in 1687, destroyed the Indian village of Gannagaro and Gaudougarae, the inhabitants were driven eastward and formed a village near the foot of Canandaigua Lake, which village and lake have since then borne that name. Among the Indian inhabitants in those days were many Catholics, some of them Senecas and most of them Hurons and Algonquin captives, the result of fifty years of missionary labor of the zealous Jesuits. Even in our day the beads and crucifixes given the Indians by the missionaries are still picked up on the sites of the old Indian towns. Following the revolution and the white settlement of western New York, Canandaigua became a prominent center of commerce and government, and no doubt many Catholics were among the pioneers. The family of Hugh Collins came as early as 1823, others followed, and there are traditions of lumber wagons leaving here Saturday afternoons to bring the people to the Sunday mass at St. Patrick’s in Rochester. About 1840 Rev. Bernard O’Reilly, of Rochester, said the first mass in Canandaigua in the Patrick Doyle house on Antis street. Mass was celebrated in various homes for the following few years. At length, in 1844, a lot was purchased by Father O’Reilly from Thomas Beals, and in the fall of 1846 the pew books give the following list of pewholders. On...

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Biography of Frederick Cook

FREDERICK COOK A MAN who has reflected great honor upon American institutions, is the Hon. Frederick Cook, ex-secretary of state of New York. He is a striking representative of the best type of a German citizen whose leading traits of character have been fully developed upon American soil. He was born on the 2nd of December, 1833, at Wildbad, Germany, a noted watering place in the famous Black Forest district. His father was a contractor, a man who intended to have given his son Frederick the advantages of a thorough collegiate course. The boy was placed at the best school in the neighborhood, and his youthful years were earnestly devoted to the elementary branches of learning. The industrious young student was increasing rapidly in knowledge from year to year, with the brightest prospects before him, when suddenly a dark cloud overshadowed his opening literary career and dashed to the ground his hopes of obtaining a complete collegiate education. When he had reached his twelfth year, his excellent father, who had taken so deep an interest in the instruction of his promising son, died, leaving a family of eight children. By this irreparable loss the happy home was broken up and the children scattered abroad. Without a father’s watchful care, Frederick was left at this tender age almost entirely to his own resources. But with a brave heart and an...

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Biography of Willis S. Paine

WILLIS S. PAINE IN the exacting, complicated, and responsible duties connected with the history and oversight of banking institutions in our state no man has gained a more exalted reputation or been more generally commended for his official acts than the subject of this sketch. His public services are well known, even beyond the limits of our own state, and his career is replete with interest to banking men and financiers. Born in Rochester, N. Y., on the 1st of January, 1848, he spent his childhood in that beautiful city; growing up under the tender and watchful care of cultured and highly esteemed parents. His ancestry is of the enterprising, solid and patriotic New England stock. Robert Treat Paine, one of the signers of the declaration of independence was a member of this old family. Willis S. is a son of Nicholas E. Paine, who was a distinguished lawyer of Rochester, and who on account of his forensic ability was elected district attorney of Monroe County, while yet a young man. In later life he held the offices of mayor and president of the board of education in Rochester. His mother’s maiden name was Abby M. Sprague, a descendant of the old governors, Bradford and Prince, famous in the colonial history of Massachusetts. In 1885 Nicholas E. Paine and his wife Abby celebrated their golden wedding in true New...

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Biography of Hon. John T. Browning

The oldest member of the Rock Island County Bar, a lawyer of ripe learninig and wide experience, who has now retired from the active practice of his profession, is the Honorable John T. Browning, of Moline. He was born in Genesee County, New York, June 11, 1830, his parents being John L. and Lucy (Tillotson) Browning. He received an academic education at Rochester, where later he was admitted to the bar in the Autumn of 1858. He came west in December of that same year and located at Moline, where he immediately engaged in the practice of law, being that city’s first City Attorney. Of course one of his duties in this position was to compile and arrange a code of ordinances governing the affairs of the City, and this work was done in a highly creditable and systematic manner. In 1876 he formed a law partnership with Mr. Entriken, the well known Moline attorney who has served this County as State’s Attorney and Master in Chancery, the firm being known as Browning & Entriken. Two years previous to the formation of this partnership Mr. Browning had been elected to represent this Senatorial District in the Illinois General Assembly. He was re-elected in 1876 and served through another session of the Legislature. During Mr. Browning’s young manhood he entertained very pronounced anti-slavery views and was in fact an ardent...

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Biography of John H. Thornton

Mr. John H. Thornton, veteran of the Civil War and for many years employed in the Government service at Rock Island Arsenal, was born in Ireland June 24, 1847, and died at his home in Moline July 9, 1903. He was the son of Patrick and Mary Thornton and came to America with his parents while an infant, aged nine months. The mother died in Rochester, New York, after which the father removed to Philadelphia, from which city, at the age of sixteen, young Thornton enlisted, July 26, 1862, in Company Fifty-three, Twenty-Ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Third Infrntry. His Company was assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was in numerous engagements, among them may be named the Battle of Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Zurmell Hill. In 1865 he was honorably discharged and returning to Philadelphia he followed the arts of peace for the succeeding five years, when in 1870 he enlisted in the Ordnance Corps of the United States Army, and was assigned for duty at Rock Island Arsenal. Coming here with Captain Farley, who was next in command at the Arsenal, when General Flagler was Commandant, Mr. Thornton served on the Island till 1894, when he was placed on the retired list as Sergeant, after a total of thirty years of service, with pay of forty...

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