Location: Randolph County IN

Biography of George W. Fenimore

George W. Fenimore. After half a century of almost uninterrupted peace and prosperity America is again at war, and in this condition the people appreciate more than ever the splendid services and devotion of those brave boys in blue who defended the Union at the time of the Civil War. That war made America a great and united nation, unexampled in resources and material achievement, and there is a direct logical connection between the victories of the Union troops on Southern battlefields fifty years ago and the present great world struggle, when America, by lending its resources and soldiers to war stricken Europe occupies the dominant position in the world’s affairs and can practically dictate the terms on which national life everywhere shall be reorganized on a basis of permanent democracy. Hence there is every reason to refer gratefully to the soldiers of our own Civil War, and pay tribute to the guardians of the nation in those critical times. One of them in Champaign County was George W. Fenimore, proprietor of the Fenimore House of Sidney. After a long life of arduous labor and industry he spent his declining years with the tender devotion and care of his wife and daughters, and answered the final summons of death on October 29, 1917. George W. Fenimore was born in Randolph County, Indiana, February 22, 1842, a son of Pierson...

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Biography of Louis N. B. Anderson

Fortunate is the man who has back of him an ancestry honorable and distinguished, and happy is he whose lines of life are cast in harmony therewith. In person, in character and talents, Mr. Anderson is a worthy scion of his race. Though his life has been one rather of modest reserve than of ambitious self-seeking, he has shown himself a peer of the brightest men of his adopted state, and his mental talents led to his selection for the important position of superintendent of public instruction of Idaho for the years 1897 and 1898, in which capacity he served with distinction. For several generations his ancestors have devoted their energies to the advancement of intellectual acquirements among their fellow men. His great-grandfather, a native of Denmark, followed school teaching in his native land prior to his emigration to America. The latter event occurred, however, in the colonial period of our country, and he aided in the struggle which brought to the nation her independence. He afterward erected a schoolhouse, and conducted a private school throughout the remainder of his life. He was born December 22, 1747, and died in 1834, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. His son, Allen Anderson, the grandfather of our subject, was born in North Carolina, in 1777, and he likewise devoted his life to educational work. He married a Miss Evans, and...

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Biography of Simon Coats

Simon Coats. Among the men who are representing Wilson County in positions of public importance, none have a better record for clean and capable service than had Simon Coats, sheriff, who had held his present position since January, 1915, but who had been connected with the sheriff’s office since 1911. He had been a resident of Wilson County for more than forty-five years, during which time he had been identified with farming, stockraising and business ventures, and is well and widely known to the people of this community as an honorable man of business and an official possessed of the courage and the ability to discharge well the duties of any office to which he may be elected. Sheriff Coats was born in Randolph County, Indiana, June 30, 1860, and is a son of Daniel and Mary Ann (Snyder) Coats, and a member of a Welsh family that was founded in the United States prior to the Revolution, when the first of the name located in Pennsylvania. The great-grandfather of Simon Coats was John Coats, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1782. From that state he went to Ohio, and when he took up Government land in Indiana and became the pioneer of the family in that state, he was compelled to freight his supplies into the wilderness of Randolph County, where his new home was located. He was...

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Wright, Mary – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon The passing of one of Wallowa’s pioneers occurred Tuesday morning July 9th, when Aunt Mary Wright died at her home in Enterprise after an illness of several months. She and her husband homesteaded on Alder slope among the very first settlers in the county. Had she lived until December would have 89 years. Three sons are living in this city: George, Layfayette and Tom Wright. One son, Henry Wright lives in Portland and a daughter, Mrs. H. A. Owenby at Oregon City. The funeral is this afternoon at 2 p.m. at the Alder church, Rev. Sibley officiating. Wallowa County Reporter Wednesday July 10, 1918 Aunt Mary Wright Called To Last Rest Pioneer Woman Gone to Last Home Leaving a Record of a Long and Useful Life Mrs. Mary Wright, one of the oldest residents of Wallowa county, died at her home in Enterprise, early Tuesday morning, July 9. Funeral services were held yesterday at the Alder church, conducted by Rev. F.R. Sibley. The church were the services were held was on ground given by Mr. and Mrs. Wright from their homestead. Five children remain: Mrs. I. J. Ownbey, George W. Lafayette and Thomas of Enterprise, and Henry of Portland. “Aunt Mary” as she was familiarly called came to this county in 1872 and has resided here continuously. To her many old friends and to later residents the...

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Biography of William Craig, M. D.

William Craig, M. D., Redlands, was born in Pennsylvania, January 2, 1818. His father, Samuel Craig, was a tanner and farmer, and moved to Clark County, Ohio, in 1819. Our subject attended the common schools of Clark County, and in 1848 graduated at the Starling Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio. He then practiced medicine in Shelby County three years, and in Auglaize County three years. The five years following this he practiced in Winchester, Indiana, where he also carried on a drug business. Then he went to Muncie, Indiana, where he engaged in the drug business and practiced medicine for ten years. Then he successfully engaged in the baking powder business for some two years. In October, 1870, he moved to California, and was one of the first settlers in Riverside, where he pre-empted eighty acres of land and plowed the first furrow ever plowed there. He also built the first hotel in Riverside, and carried on the hotel business for about seven years, or until his hotel was burned. He, having previously purchased 108 acres of fine land three miles east of Redlands, has a magnificent country residence and as fine a vineyard as there is in the valley; also, 500 orange trees in full bearing. Dr. Craig has been twice married; first at Muncie, Indiana, March 30, 1838, to Joanna Moore. In six months she died, and...

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Biography of Kelita Davis Shugart, M. D.

Kelita Davis Shugart, M. D. No history of Riverside can be considered complete without a more than passing mention of the pioneer of Riverside colony whose name heads this sketch. In 1869 Dr. Shugart was a resident of Belle Plain, Iowa, and at that time was desirous of establishing his residence in some portion of Southern California. Early the next year he associated himself with Judge North, Dr. Greves, Sanford Eastman, C. N. Felton, of San Francisco, and Captain Broadhurst and others, and formed the Southern California Colony Association. The object of the association was to purchase some desirable tract of land in Southern California and establish a colony, build up desirable homes, and engage in horticultural pursuits. Some months were spent by members of the association in seeking a suitable location, but they were unable to decide the vexed question. The Doctor became impatient at the delay, and in August of 1870 came to California and joined his associates. Judge E. G. Brown, who had joined the company, and Dr. J. P. Greves, visited the Riverside Valley in June, and made a partial examination of the lands, water supply, etc., and strongly recommended the purchase of lands by the association; but nothing was done. On August 25, 1870, Dr. Shugart, accompanied by Dr. Greves, Messrs. Luther, of San Francisco, and Stewart, of San Bernardino, visited the lands and...

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Biography of James B. Jones M. D.

James B. Jones, M. D. For almost a half century Dr. James B. Jones had been in the active practice of his noble profession in Anderson County, Kansas, and while widely known and universally appreciated in other honorable capacities, it is as the skilled and experienced physician and surgeon that his people love him most. Doctor Jones was born October 21, 1847, in Randolph County, Indiana, in one of the picturesque little pioneer cabins that have long since given way in that section to the march of progress, but the memory of which still lingers along with childhood’s recollections. His parents were Llewellyn A. and Lucinda Jane (Parsons) Jones. The father of Doctor Jones was born in 1811 in Rockbridge County, Virginia, coming of Welsh stock, and he died in 1895, at Abilene, Kansas. His business was farming and he was also a minister in the United Brethren faith. In 1830 he was married to Lucinda Jane Parsons, who was a daughter of Robert J. Parsons, a veteran of the Revolutionary war. She was born in Randolph County, Indiana, and died there in 1850. To this marriage nine children were born, seven sons and two daughters, both of the latter dying in infancy. The sons were: William T., David, Lewis, Llewellyn A., all deceased; James B., Henry F., now of Chanute, Kansas, and John M., of Oklahoma. James B....

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Biography of Henry Brandley

Henry Brandley was born in Switzerland October 12, 1839, and died at his beautiful home at Matfield Green in Chase County June 1, 1910. When he was about twelve years of age his parents came to America, being fifty-two days in crossing the ocean. In 1852 the family settled in Cincinnati, where he finished his education and worked at the painter’s trade. In 1856 the Brandleys moved to Randolph. County, Indiana, and there the young man had further experience as a farm hand, in a shingle mill, as rail maker and digger of ditches. In the spring of 1859 he went overland to Western Iowa but in the same fall came on foot to Tecumseh, Kansas, where he was employed in a brick yard for a short time and then took up a claim in Chase County, which was still unorganized. During the following winter he built a shanty on his claim and when he returned from Ohio in 1860 he found another occupant on his quarter section. After a contest he was declared the legal owner and he at once set to work to develop and prove up. At the outbreak of the war he walked forty miles to Emporia to enlist with the Lyon County troops, commanded by L. T. Heritage. He was mustered in September 1, 1861, and a few days later the company was consolidated...

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Biography of Charles Samuel Strahan, M. D.

Charles Samuel Strahan, M. D. While Doctor Strahan has the distinction of having been the mayor of Galesburg, Kansas, his high standing in that community is chiefly due to his long and active practice as a physician and surgeon. Doctor Strahan fought many battles with circumstances before he was able to gain his ambition and enter upon the practice of medicine, and throughout life has been a hard worker, conscientious in all his dealings, and has thoroughly deserved every item of his success. The Strahan family is of Scotch-Irish origin, and Doctor Strahan’s grandfather, Robert, was a native of Scotland, came to America and settled in Virginia and afterwards went across the mountains into Kentucky, and followed farming until his death in Flemming County, Kentucky. He died before Doctor Strahan was born. The next generation of the family is represented by Samuel Strahan, who was born in Virginia in 1812. He grew to manhood in Fleming County, Kentucky, where he married. In early years he was a stock buyer, but in 1844 he removed to Randolph County along the east line of the State of Indiana and was a farmer there until his death in 1896. He was a republican voter and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Samuel Strahan married Martha Hunt, who was born in Fleming County, Kentucky, in 1821 and died in Randolph County, Indiana,...

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Biography of Calvin L. Long

Calvin L. Long. When Calvin L. Long came to Montgomery County thirty-seven years ago he found himself associated with the very early pioneers, and is one of the residents of that county who have witnessed practically every phase of development and progress. Mr. Long is one of the oldest men in the real estate business at Coffeyville, and his reputation as a reliable dealer and man of unusual judgment and experience in that line has been in full proportion to his years of activity. Born in Delaware County, Indiana, July 12, 1852, he grew up on a farm, attended country schools, apent two years in Ridgeville College, a Baptist institution at Ridgeville, Indiana, and in 1871 entered the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, where he took both the teachers’ training course and a business course, graduating in 1873. Meanwhile he had begun his work as a teacher, which he followed for a number of years. As teacher he faced the scholars of a country school in Delaware County for the first time on December 4, 1869. Altogether he taught eight years in Delaware County. He was then in the stock business and farming from 1879 until 1882. Coming to Montgomery County he found Coffeyville little more than a frontier village and market town for cattle man, with perhaps 1,000 inhabitants. For the first two years he was in...

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Biographical Sketch of W. P. Green

W. P. Green, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Ashmore; was born in Miami Co., Ohio, Sept. 8, 1827, being a son of James and Elizabeth (Heminway) Green; when he was about 10 years old, his parents removed to Randolph Co., Ind., and, in 1840, to Coles Co., returning a few years later to Ohio, and lived awhile in Darke Co., from which county they removed again to Randolph Co., Ind., and thence to Grant Co.; his father opened no less than seven farms in Ohio and Indiana the year the family returned to Ohio, Mr. Green made four trips between the two States; on becoming of age, he went to Preble Co., Ohio. He was married Nov. 2, 1851, to Miss Elizabeth Wilkinson, a daughter of Charles Wilkinson, of Preble Co., Ohio; she died Feb. 20, 1862, leaving three children, two of whom are living – Charles E. and James O. In the spring of 1863, Mr. Green came again to Coles Co., making seven trips during the summer. He was married Aug. 20, 1863, to Miss Eliza J. Brown, a daughter of J. W. and Martha R. Brown, of Ashmore; she was born at the Walnut Grove, in Edgar Co., Sept. 20, 1836; they have six children – Leona, Clarence E., Miner E., Jennie, Thomas L. and Nora. Mr. Green owns a farm of 160 acres, on which...

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