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Location: Raleigh North Carolina

Emily H. Walker

Civilian Relief Dept., American Red Cross. Daughter of Mrs. Kate Dibrell Walker, of Raleigh, N.C. Taught in Wake County Schools, N.C.; supervisor of rural schools, Scotland County, at the same time; Food Administrator of the county; the first woman appointed as such in N.C. Record with Red Cross began in fall of 1917 with the Home Service Dept. of the Red Cross in Charlotte, N.C. Remained there several weeks. Promoted to Field Supervisor of Home Service, to be sent into any of the five Southern States of Red Cross–N.C., S. C., Ga., Tenn., Fla. At present Field Representative of the Red Cross, Headquarters, Atlanta,...

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Frederick Cain Manning

2nd Lt. Trench Mortar, 4th Battln. Born in Wake County Oct. 19, 1894; son of James S. and Mrs. Lula Cain Manning. Entered service April, 1917, at Raleigh, N.C. Sent to Fortress Monroe, January, 1918. Transferred to Camp Eustus, July, 1918; from there to Camp Newport News, Oct. 7, 1918. Sailed for France and landed Oct. 20, 1918. Sent to Naval Base Hospital No. 1, Oct. 20, 1918. Died in hospital October 24th, from influenza-pneumonia. Buried at Lembecelle Cemetery. Later remains removed and buried at Raleigh, July 25,...

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Narrative – Lunsford Lane

The small city of Raleigh, North Carolina, it is known, is the capital of the State, situated in the interior, and containing about thirty six hundred inhabitants. 1175 whites—207 free people of color—and 2,244 slaves. Total 3,626; according to the census of 1840. Here lived MR. SHERWOOD HAYWOOD, a man of considerable respectability, a planter, and the cashier of a bank. He owned three plantations, at the distances respectively of seventy-five, thirty, and three miles from his residence in Raleigh. He owned in all about two hundred and fifty slaves, among the rest my mother, who was a house servant to her master, and of course a resident in the city. My father was a slave to a near neighbor. The apartment where I was born and where I spent my childhood and youth was called “the kitchen,” situated some fifteen or twenty rods from the “great house.” Here the house servants lodged and lived, and here the meals were prepared for the people in the mansion. On the 30th of May, 1803, I was ushered into the world; but I did not begin to see the rising of its dark clouds, nor fancy how they might be broken and dispersed, until some time afterwards. My infancy was spent upon the floor, in a rough cradle, or sometimes in my mother’s arms. My early boyhood in playing with the...

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Biographical Sketch of Jones, Julia, Mrs.

Mrs. Julia Jones, daughter of Judge C. C. Dyer, was born in Fort Bend County in 1839. Her father was a native of Tennessee and was born at Dyersburg January 29, 1799, and came to Texas with William Stafford in 1824. In this same year he married Sarah Stafford, who was born February 5, 1809, near Raleigh, North Carolina, Judge Dyer had twelve in family six boys and six girls. He lived to quite an old age, served as county judge of Fort Bend County, and died in 1864 on his farm on the east side of the Brazos River, opposite Richmond. He had been suffering for some time with heart trouble and fell in the field one morning while taking a walk, and was brought to the house dead by the Negro field hands. Mrs. Dyer died in 1874. Their homestead is now known as the Pleasant’s place. William Thomas, eldest son of Judge and Mrs. Dyer, was born in 1825. He married Miss Annie Swenson, who still survives. Her brother, F. M. Swenson, lived in Fort Bend County prior to the Civil War, but removed to New York and became a prominent banker there. William Dyer died at Round Rock, Texas, February 25, 1903, at the advanced gage of 87 years. James Foster Dyer was born in 1827 and in 1852 married Miss Sarah Catherine Barnett, daughter...

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Biography of Pleasants, George W.

Austin Colonist George Washington Pleasants was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, March 30th, 1809, and came from there to Texas in 1830, and first settled at Columbia, and lived there until 1833. There was a great cholera epidemic that year at Columbia, which nearly depopulated the town. Mr. Pleasants had two sisters to die there; one, Fannie, was the wife of Kinchen Davis, and mother of Captain W. K. Davis, father of Judge J. H. P. Davis, of Richmond. Captain W. K. Davis was a Mier prisoner, as will be seen from the account elsewhere of that expedition. After the death of his sisters, Mr. Pleasants left Columbia with their children, and went out in the country to live. There were five or six of the Davis children, and two of the others, the names of whom (the latter) the writer has not been able to learn. When the war commenced with the Mexicans in 1835 Mr. Pleasants went with the army of General Austin to San Antonia, and was in all of the fighting around that place, and helped to storm the town under Colonel Ben Milam. He remained with the army until after the battle of San Jacinto, and then settled in Fort Bend County. In June, 1842, he married Miss Jane Brush, who was born November 5th, 1821. She and her mother, who was a widow,...

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