Location: Raleigh North Carolina

Slave Narrative of Herndon Bogan

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Herndon Bogan Location: State Prison, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Union County, South Carolina Age: 76 (?) Occupation: Houseboy, Night Watch Railroad Tracks An interview with Herndon Bogan, 76 (?) of State Prison, Raleigh, N. C. I wus bawned in Union County, South Carolina on de plantation o’ Doctor Bogan, who owned both my mammy Issia, an’ my pap Edwin. Dar wus six o’ us chilluns; Clara, Lula, Joe, Tux, Mack an’ me. I doan’ member much ’bout slavery days ‘cept dat my white folkses wus good ter us. Dar wus a heap o’ slaves, maybe a hundert an’ fifty. I ‘members dat we wucked hard, but we had plenty ter eat an’ w’ar, eben iffen we did w’ar wood shoes. I kin barely recolleck ‘fore de war dat I’se seed a heap o’ cocks fightin’ in pits an’ a heap o’ horse racin’. When de marster winned he ‘ud give us niggers a big dinner or a dance, but if he lost, oh! My daddy wus gived ter de doctor when de doctor wus married an’ dey shore loved each other. One day marster, he comes in an’ he sez dat de Yankees am aimin’ ter try ter take his niggers way from him, but dat dey am gwine ter ketch hell while dey does hit. When he sez dat he...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Viney Baker

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Viney Baker Location: S. Harrington Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 78 An interview with Viney Baker 78 of S. Harrington Street, Raleigh. My mammy wuz Hannah Murry an’ so fur as I know I ain’t got no father, do’ I reckon dat he wuz de plantation stock nigger. I wuz borned in Virginia as yo’ mought say ter my marster Mr. S. L. Allen. We moved when I wuz little ter Durham County whar we fared bad. We ain’t had nothin’ much ter eat an’ ter w’ar. He had a hundert slaves an’ I reckon five hundert acres o’ lan’. He made us wuck hard, de little ones included. One night I lay down on de straw mattress wid my mammy, an’ de nex’ mo’nin’ I woked up an’ she wuz gone. When I axed ’bout her I fin’s dat a speculator comed dar de night before an’ wanted ter buy a ‘oman. Dey had come an’ got my mammy widout wakin’ me up. I has always been glad somehow dat I wuz asleep. Dey uster tie me ter a tree an’ beat me till de blood run down my back, I doan ‘member nothin’ dat I done, I jist ‘members de whuppin’s. Some of de rest wuz beat wuser dan I wuz too, an’ I uster scream dat I wuz sho’ dyin’....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Ora M. Flagg

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Ora M. Flagg Location: 811 Oberlin Road,┬áRaleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: October 16, 1860 My name is Ora M. Flagg. I wus born in Raleigh near the Professional Building, in the year 1860, October 16. My mother wus named Jane Busbee. Her marster wus Quent Busbee, a lawyer. Her missus wus Julia Busbee. She wus a Taylor before she married Mr. Busbee. Now I tell you, I can’t tell you exactly, but the old heads died. The old heads were the Scurlocks who lived in Chatham County. I heard their names but I don’t remember them. Their children when they died drawed for the slaves and my mother wus brought to Raleigh when she wus eight years old. She came from the Scurlocks to the Busbees. The Taylors were relatives of the Scurlocks, and were allowed to draw, and Julia Taylor drawed my mother. It wus fixed so the slaves on this estate could not be sold, but could be drawed for by the family and relatives. She got along just middlin’ after her missus died. When her missus died, mother said she had to look after herself. Mr. Busbee would not allow anyone to whip mother. He married Miss Lizzie Bledsoe the second time. I wus only a child and, of course, I thought as...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Addy Gill

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Addy Gill Location: 1614 “B” St., Lincoln Park, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Millburnie, Wake County, NC Date of Birth: Jan. 6, 1863 Age: 74 Occupation: Butler I am seventy four years of age. I wus born a slave Jan. 6, 1863 on a plantation near Millburnie, Wake County, owned by Major Wilder, who hired my father’s time. His wife wus named Sarah Wilder. I don’t know anything ’bout slavery ‘cept what wus tole me by father and mother but I do know that if it had not been for what de southern white folks done for us niggers we’d have perished to death. De north turned us out wid out anything to make a livin’ wid. My father wus David Gill and, my mother wus Emily Gill. My father wus a blacksmith an he moved from place to place where dey hired his time. Dats why I wus born on Major Wilders place. Marster Gill who owned us hired father to Major Wilder and mother moved wid him. For a longtime atter de war, nine years, we stayed on wid Major Wilder, de place we wus at when dey set us free. Mr. Wilder had a large plantation and owned a large number of slaves before de surrender. I only ‘members fourteen of de ones I know belonged to him. Mr....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Lucy Ann Dunn

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Lucy Ann Dunn Location: 220 Cannon Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 90 Occupation: House girl Aunt Lucy’s Love Story An interview with 90 years old, 220 Cannon Street, Raleigh, N. C. My pappy, Dempsey, my mammy, Rachel an’ my brothers an’ sisters an’ me all belonged ter Marse Peterson Dunn of Neuse, here in Wake County. Dar wus five of us chilluns, Allen, Charles, Corina, Madora an’ me, all borned before de war. My mammy wus de cook, an’ fur back as I ‘members almost, I wus a house girl. I fanned flies offen de table an’ done a heap of little things fer Mis’ Betsy, Marse Peterson’s wife. My pappy worked on de farm, which wus boun’ ter have been a big plantation wid two hundert an’ more niggers ter work hit. I ‘members when word come dat war wus declared, how Mis’ Betsy cried an’ prayed an’ how Marse Peter quarreled an’ walked de floor cussin’ de Yankees. De war comes on jist de same an’ some of de men slaves wus sent ter Roanoke ter hep buil’ de fort. Yes mam, de war comes ter de great house an’ ter de slave cabins jist alike. De great house wus large an’ white washed, wid green blinds an’ de slave cabins wus made of slabs wid plank floors. We had plenty...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Elbert Hunter

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Elbert Hunter Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: Method, North Carolina Date of Birth: 1844 Age: 93 I wuz borned eight miles from Raleigh on de plantation of Mr. Jacob Hunter in 1844. My parents were Stroud and Lucy an’ my brothers wuz Tom, Jeems an’ Henderson. I had three sisters who wuz named Caroline, Emiline an’ Ann. Massa Hunter wuz good to us, an’ young Massa Knox wuz good too. My mammy wuz de cook an’ my pappy wuz a field hand. Massa ain’t ‘lowed no patterollers on his place, but one time when he wuzn’t ter home my mammy sent me an’ Caroline ter de nex’ door house fer something an’ de patterollers got us. Dey carried us home an’ ’bout de time dat dey wuz axin’ questions young Massa Knox rid up. He look dem over an’ he sez, ‘Git off dese premises dis minute, yo’ dad-limb sorry rascals, if us needs yo’ we’ll call yo’. ‘My pappy patterolls dis place hisself.’ Dey left den, an’ we ain’t been bothered wid ’em no more. I toted water ‘fore de war, minded de sheeps, cows and de geese; an’ I ain’t had many whuppin’s neither. Dar wuz one thing dat massa ain’t ‘low an’ dat wuz drinkin’ ‘mong his niggers. Dar wuz a ole free issue named Denson who digged...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Jennylin Dunn

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Jennylin Dunn Location: 315 Bledsoe Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Wake County NC Age: 87 Ex-Slave Story An interview with Jennylin Dunn 87, of 315 Bledsoe Avenue, Raleigh, N. C. I wuz borned hyar in Wake County eighty-seben years ago. Me an’ my folks an’ bout six others belonged ter Mis’ Betsy Lassiter who wuz right good ter us, do’ she sho’ did know dat chilluns needs a little brushin’ now an’ den. My papa wuz named Isaac, my mammy wuz named Liza, an’ my sisters wuz named Lucy, Candice an’ Harriet. Dar wuz one boy what died ‘fore I can ‘member an’ I doan know his name. We ain’t played no games ner sung no songs, but we had fruit ter eat an’ a heap of watermillions ter eat in de season. I seed seberal slabe sales on de block, front of de Raleigh Cou’t house, an’ yo’ can’t think how dese things stuck in my mind. A whole heap o’ times I seed mammies sold from dere little babies, an’ dar wuz no’min’ den, as yo’ knows. De patterollers wuz sumpin dat I wuz skeerd of. I know jist two o’ ’em, Mr. Billy Allen Dunn an’ Mr. Jim Ray, an’ I’se hyard of some scandelous things dat dey done. Dey do say dat dey whupped some of de...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Charlie H. Hunter

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Charlie H. Hunter Location: 2213 Barker Street, West Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: May, 1857 Place of Birth: Wake County NC Age: 80 My full name is Charlie H. Hunter. I wus borned an’ reared in Wake County, N. C., born May, 1857. My mother wus Rosa Hunter an’ my father wus named Jones. I never saw my father. We belonged to a family named Jones first, an’ then we wus sold to a slave owner seven miles Northwest by the name Joe Hayes an’ a terrible man he wus. He would get mad ’bout most anything, take my mother, chain her down to a log and whup her unmercifully while I, a little boy, could do nothing but stan’ there an’ cry, an’ see her whupped. We had fairly good food an’ common clothing. We had good sleeping places. My mother wus sold to a man named Smith. I married first Annie Hayes who lived sixteen months. No prayer meetings wus allowed on de plantations an’ no books of any kind. I can read an’ write, learned in a school taught by Northern folks after the surrender, Mr. an’ Mrs. Graves who taught in Raleigh in the rear of the African Methodist Episcopal church. The school house wus owned by the church. We played no games in slavery times. I saw...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Jerry Davis

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Jerry Davis Location: 228 E. South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Warren County NC Age: 74 Jerry Davis Ex-Slave Story and Folk Tale An interview with Jerry Davis 74 of 228 E. South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. I wus borned in Warren County ter Mataldia an’ Jordan Davis. Dere wus twenty-two o’ us chilluns, an’ natu’ally Marster Sam Davis laked my mammy an’ daddy. He owned two hundert an’ sebenty slaves, an’ three, four, or five scopes o’ lan’. Marster wus good ter us, he gibe us plenty ter eat, an’ w’ar, an’ he wus good an’ kind in his talkin’. I warn’t big ’nuff ter do much ‘sides min’ de chickens, an’ sich lak. I doan ‘member so much ’bout de Yankees comin’ ‘cept sein’ dem, an’ dat dey gibe my pappy a new blue overcoat an’ dat I slep’ on it onct er twict. I knows dat de Yankees wus good ter de niggers but dey warn’t so good ter de ole Issues. Dey did ‘stroy most eber’thing do’. I can’t ‘member, but I’se hyard my mammy tell o’ dances, co’n shuckin’s, wrestlin’ matches, candy pullin’s an’ sich things dat wus had by de slaves dem days. My pappy tol’ me ’bout de cock fights in de big pits at Warrenton an’ how dat when de roosters got killed...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Susan High

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Susan High Location: 519 Haywood Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 70 My name is Susan High. I wus born in June. I am 70 years old. My mother wus named Piety an’ she belonged to de ole man Giles Underhill before de surrender. My father he wus George Merritt an’ he belonged to Ben Merritt, Ivan Proctor’s grandfather. Dey lived on a plantation near Eagle Rock, Wake County. Dey called de creek near by Mark’s Creek. My parents said dat dey had a mighty hard time, an’ dat durin’ slavery time, de rules wus mighty strict. De hours of work on de farm wus from sun to sun wid no time ‘cept at Christmas and at lay-by time, 4th of July for anything but work. Dey were not ‘lowed no edication, and very little time to go to church. Sometimes de went to de white folks church. Mother said dey whupped de slaves if dey broke de rules. Dey said de overseers were worse den de slave owners. De overseers were ginerally white men hired by de marster. My father said dey had poor white men to overseer, and de slave owner would go on about his business and sometimes didn’t know an’ didn’t eben care how mean de overseer wus to de slaves. Dere wus a lot o’ things to drink, dey...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Harriet Ann Daves

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Harriet Ann Daves Location: 601 E. Cabarrus Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: June 6, 1856 My full name is Harriet Ann Daves, I like to be called Harriet Ann. If my mother called me when she was living, I didn’t want to answer her unless she called me Harriet Ann. I was born June 6, 1856. Milton Waddell, my mother’s marster was my father, and he never denied me to anybody. My mother was a slave but she was white. I do not know who my mother’s father was. My mother was Mary Collins. She said that her father was an Indian. My mother’s mother was Mary Jane Collins, and she was white–maybe part Indian. My grandfather was old man William D. Waddell, a white man. I was born in Virginia near Orange Courthouse. The Waddells moved to Lexington, Missouri, after I was born. I guess some of the family would not like it if they knew I was telling this. We had good food and a nice place to live. I was nothing but a child, but I know, and remember that I was treated kindly. I remember the surrender very well. When the surrender came my grandfather came to mother and told her: ‘Well, you are as free as I am.’ That was William D. Waddell. He was one...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Essex Henry

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Essex Henry Location: 713 S. East Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 83 Ex-Slave Story An interview with Essex Henry 83 of 713 S. East Street, Raleigh, N. C. I wus borned five miles north of Raleigh on de Wendell Road, 83 years ago. My mammy wus Nancy an’ my pappy wus Louis. I had one sister, Mary, an’ one bruder, Louis. We ‘longed ter Mr. Jake Mordecai, an’ we lived on his six hundert acres plantation ’bout a mile from Millbrook. Right atter de war he sold dis lan’ ter Doctor Miller an’ bought de Betsy Hinton tract at Milburnie. Mr. Jake had four or five hundert niggers hyar an’ I doan know how many at de Edgecombe County place. De wuck wus hard den, I knows case I’se seed my little mammy dig ditches wid de best of ’em. I’se seed her split 350 rails a day many’s de time. Dat wus her po’tion you knows, an’ de mens had ter split 500. I wus too little ter do much but min’ de chickens outen de gyarden, an’ so I fared better dan most of ’em. You see Miss Tempie ‘ud see me out at de gate mornin’s as dey wus eatin’ breakfas’ on de ferander, an’ she’ud call me ter her an’ give me butter toasted lightbread or biscuits. She’d give...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Alonzo Haywood

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Alonzo Haywood Location: 1217 Oberlin Road, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 67 Occupation: Blacksmith The Blacksmith An interview with Alonzo Haywood, 67 years old of 1217 Oberlin Road. On East Cabarrus Street is a blacksmith shop which is a survival of horse and buggy days, and the smiling blacksmith, a Negro, although he has hazel eyes, recounts the story of his father’s life and his own. My father was Willis Haywood and in slavery days he belonged to Mr. William R. Pool. Mr. Pool liked father because he was quick and obedient so he determined to give him a trade. Wilson Morgan run the blacksmith shop at Falls of Neuse and it was him that taught my father the trade at Mr. Pool’s insistence. While father, a young blade, worked and lived at Falls of Neuse, he fell in love with my mother, Mirana Denson, who lived in Raleigh. He come to see her ever’ chance he got and then they were married. When the Yankees were crossing the Neuse Bridge at the falls, near the old paper mill, the bridge broke in. They were carrying the heavy artillery over and a great many men followed, in fact the line extended to Raleigh, because when the bridge fell word passed by word of mouth from man to man back to Raleigh. Father said that...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Charlie Crump

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Charlie Crump Location: Cary, North Carolina Place of Birth: Evan’s Ferry, Lee or Chatham County, North Carolina Age: 82 Occupation: Farmer An interview with Charlie Crump 82 of Cary (near) I wuz borned at Evan’s Ferry in Lee or Chatham County, an’ I belonged ter Mr. Davis Abernathy an’ his wife Mis’ Vick. My pappy wuz named Ridge, an’ my mammy wuz named Marthy. My brothers wuz Stokes an’ Tucker, an’ my sisters wuz Lula an’ Liddy Ann. Dar wuz nine o’ us in all, but some o’ dem wuz sold, an’ some o’ dem wuz dead. De Abernathy’s wuzn’t good ter us, we got very little ter eat, nothin’ ter wear an’ a whole lot o’ whuppin’s. Dey ain’t had no slaves ‘cept seben or eight, in fact, dey wuz pore white trash tryin’ ter git rich; so dey make us wuck. Dey wucks us from daylight till dark, an’ sometimes we jist gits one meal a day. De marster says dat empty niggers am good niggers an’ dat full niggers has got de debil in dem. An’ we ain’t ‘lowed ter go nowhar at night, dat is if dey knowed it. I’se seed de time dat niggers from all ober de neighborhood gang up an’ have fun anyhow, but if dey hyard de patterollers comin’ gallopin’ on a hoss dey’d fly....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Kitty Hill

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Kitty Hill Location: 329 West South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76-77 I tole you yisterday dat my age wus 76 years old, but my daughter come home, an’ I axed her’ bout it an’ she say I is 77 years old. I don’t know exactly the date but I wus born in April. I wus a little girl ’bout five years ole when de surrender come, but I don’t’ member anything much’ bout de Yankees. I wus born in Virginia, near Petersburg, an’ mother said de Yankees had been hanging’ round dere so long dat a soldier wus no sight to nobody. ‘Bout de time de Yankees come I’ member hearin’ dem talk ’bout de surrender. Den a Jew man by the name of Isaac Long come to Petersburg, bought us an’ brought us to Chatham County to a little country town, named Pittsboro. Ole man Isaac Long run a store an’ kept a boarding house. We stayed on de lot. My mother cooked. We stayed there a long time atter de war. Father wus sent to Manassas Gap at the beginning of de war and I do not ‘member ever seein’ him. My mother wus named Viney Jefferson an’ my father wus named Thomas Jefferson. We ‘longed to the Jeffersons there and we went by the name of Jefferson when we...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest