Location: Putnam County IL

Black Hawk’s War – Indian Wars

We have now to record the events of a war “which brought one of the noblest of Indians to the notice and admiration of the people of the United States. Black Hawk was an able and patriotic chief. With the intelligence and power to plan a great project, and to execute it, he united the lofty spirit which secures the respect and confidence of a people. He was born about the year 1767, on Rock river, Illinois. At the age of fifteen he took a scalp from the enemy, and was in consequence promoted by his tribe to the...

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Illinois Indian Land

With the rapid increase of a white population between the Lakes and the Mississippi, which followed the conclusion of hostilities with England and her Indian allies, new difficulties began to arise between the natives and the settlers. Illinois and Wisconsin were inhabited by various tribes of Indians, upon terms of bitter hostility among themselves, but united in their suspicions and apprehensions at the unprecedented inroads of emigrants from the east. The Winnebago, dwelling in Wisconsin; the Pottawatomie, situated around the southern extremity of Lake Michigan; and the Sac, (afterwards mingled with the Foxes, and usually coupled with that tribe,)...

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Biographical Sketch of Aaron B. Whiteaker

Aaron B. Whiteaker was born in Bremer County, Iowa, near the town of Independence, February 24, 1849. His father, Joseph T. Whiteaker, was born in Virginia in 1818, and came to Daviess County in 1876, where he died July 14, 1881. His mother, Eliza Harris Whiteaker, was a native of Ashland County, Ohio. The subject of this sketch spent his early life with his parents in Putnam County, Illinois, working on his father’s farm and attending school. After the removal of the family to Daviess County, he made a permanent home in Sheridan, and gives his time to the cultivation and improvement of the home farm, on which he still resides. Mr. Whiteaker was married, January 6, 1881, to Miss Eliza Roney, daughter of Henry Roney, a native of...

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Biographical Sketch of Llewellyn Kiene

Llewellyn Kiene had served four years in the office of sheriff of Shawnee County, and his administration had been all that his friends predicted and had been such as to give him rank among the ablest sheriffs this important county in the state had ever had. Sheriff Kiene is a Kansan by many years of residence and is thoroughly in the spirit of the Sunflower commonwealth. He was born March 2, 1868, in Putnam County, Illinois, one of the twelve children of Francis A. and Rose (Doriot) Kiene. When he was fifteen years of age his parents came to Kansas, and he had been a resident of the state since 1882. His education in the meantime had been supplied by the public schools of his native county and the state normal school at Emporia. Mr. Kiene is perhaps most widely known as a newspaper man, and was active in that profession for about twenty years before he became sheriff. His first work was as a reporter on the Topeka Daily Capital, beginning in 1891, and he afterwards served as city editor of the paper and later became managing editor of the Topeka State Journal. Mr. Kiene was managing editor with the Journal for about twenty years. He gave up that office in order to make a stirring canvass of the county as republican nominee for the office of sheriff,...

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Biography of George B. Keeler

There is no man who has taken more active and helpful part in the development of Bartlesville and Washington county than George B. Keeler. He has resided in this section of the state from early pioneer times and was adopted into the Cherokee tribe in 1872. He understands the sign language of all of the Indian tribes and speaks the Osage tongue. He has been in a way a connecting link between the Indian life and customs of an early day and the modern civilization and progress. His business activity has covered a wide scope, leading directly to the improvement, settlement and up building of this section of the country, where he has lived from pioneer times, Nelson F. Carr being the only white man who has resided in this part of the state for a longer period. Mr. Keeler came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred at Hennepin, Putnam county, February 7, 1850. His father, Alson Keeler, was a native of Kyler, Courtland county, New York, and in an early day removed to Illinois, where he resided until 1856. He had followed merchandising in the quaint old town of Hennepin. on the Illinois river, but when his son, George, was a lad of six years he removed with his family to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he remained for about a decade, devoting three or four...

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Biography of W. S. Moore

A notably successful career is that of W. S. Moore, a prominent stockman of Dewey, who has devoted practically all of his life to the cattle business, in which he has become recognized as a leading operator, not only in Oklahoma but through the United States. He was born in Putnam county, Illinois, December 6, 1865, being a son of Mr. and, Mrs. J. B. Moore, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. He was reared in Burlington, Iowa, and in 1884, when a young man of nineteen years, he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oklahoma. His family settled on a farm on Wolf creek, near Menapah, where for twenty years they continued to make their home, the father passing away on that place. Subsequently the mother removed to the Cherokee strip, taking up a claim near Alva, and for seven years. She lived on that property, disposing of it in order to establish her residence in Coffeyville, Kansas. She later returned to Alva, Oklahoma, and there her demise occurred in 1906, her remains being interred at Coffeyville, beside those of her husband. As a young man W. S. Moore was employed by J. S. Todd, who was one of the largest stockmen in Oklahoma, his ranch being situated in the Creek country, south of Muskogee. He remained with Mr. Todd for fourteen years, during which...

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Biography of Joseph Holmes

Joseph Holmes, one of the representative horticulturists of Ontario and progressive citizens of San Bernardino County, came to California in 1883 and located in the Ontario colony as one of its early settlers, and has ever since taken a leading part in building up his chosen section and advancing its interests. His home is on the corner of Fourth Street and Campus Avenue, where he has erected a substantial two-story residence, well furnished and fitted with modern conveniences. He has surrounded his home with ornamental trees and rich floral plants. His twenty-acre tract is located between Third and Fourth streets and east of Campus avenue. Upon this tract he has, for the past six years, been engaged in horticultural pursuits. He has now twelve acres in oranges, also a choice variety of lemons, and a family orchard of deciduous fruits. Seven acres are devoted to vineyard, producing raisin grapes of the Muscat variety. All of his trees and vines have a remarkably fine growth and attest the intelligent care bestowed upon them. Mr. Holmes is a native of Trenton, New Jersey, and dates his birth November 1819. His parents, Samuel and Hannah (Jackson) Holmes, were natives of England. His father came to the United States in 1816, and his mother in 1800. When Mr. Holmes was about six years old his parents located at Kensington, near Philadelphia, and there...

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Biography of Thomas Holmes

Thomas Holmes is a well-known resident of Ontario, San Bernardino County. He has for the past thirty years been identified with the mining, mercantile, agricultural and horticultural industries of the Pacific coast. A review of his life is of interest. Mr. Holmes was born in Lancashire England, in 1834. His parents, James and Hannah (Mort) Holmes, were natives of that place. In 1844 his father immigrated to the United States and settled in Putnam County, Illinois, where he engaged in farming and stock growing. The subject of this sketch received the benefits of a common-school education and became practically versed in the duties of a farmer. When twenty years of age he started in life for him-self, and spent the next five years in farm labor and other occupations. In the spring of 1859 he started on an over-land trip for California. After undergoing the usual hardships and labor attending a trip of that character, he arrived in August of that year and located in El Dorado County. His first occupation was in the placer mines of that section. He followed the calling of a miner in the various counties of California until 1868. In that year he entered Nevada and located in Elko County. There he combined cattle raising with his mining enterprises, and also established a general merchandise store at Truckee, under the firm name of Jones...

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