Location: Prince Georges County MD

Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, Maryland

11301 Crain Highway Cheltenham, Maryland 20623 Martin Fahey, Superintendent 301-372-6398 Cheltenham State Veterans Cemetery is located on U.S. Route 301, approximately 8 miles south of Upper Marlboro, Maryland. The site consists of 102 acres and was formerly used for agricultural purposes. Currently, the Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery is conducting more than 825 burials each year and is the final resting place for over 17,000 Maryland veterans and their dependents. The cemetery opened for burial in July 1978 and is expected to provide a total of 50,000 burial sites. The Chapel at the cemetery was dedicated to the memory of Senator Edward T. Conroy, who was instrumental in the passage of legislation enabling the development of Maryland’s State Veterans Cemeteries. You can also download a map and general cemetery information. Cemetery Hours: Cemetery gates will be open to visitors every day of the year from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The gates will close at 4:45 p.m. to allow visitors to exit the cemetery. The cemetery will remain open until 8:00 p.m. on Memorial Day (the date of State observance). Cemetery Transcriptions: Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery currently only has one listing online, providing internments and photographs. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery...

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Slave Narrative of Dennis Simms

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Dennis Simms Date of Interview: September 19, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland Date of Birth: June 17, 1841 Place of Residence: 629 Mosher St., Baltimore, Maryland Reference: Personal interview with Dennis Simms, ex-slave, September 19, 1937, at his home, 629 Mosher St., Baltimore. Born on a tobacco plantation at Contee, Prince Georges County, Maryland, June 17, 1841, Dennis Simms, Negro ex-slave, 628 Mosher Street, Baltimore, Maryland, is still working and expects to live to be a hundred years old. He has one brother living, George Simms, of South River, Maryland, who was born July 18, 1849. Both of them were born on the Contee tobacco plantation, owned by Richard and Charles Contee, whose forbears were early settlers in the State. Simms always carries a rabbit’s foot, to which he attributes his good health and long life. He has been married four times since he gained his freedom. His fourth wife, Eliza Simms, 67 years old, is now in the Providence Hospital, suffering from a broken hip she received in a fall. The aged Negro recalls many interesting and exciting incidents of slavery days. More than a hundred slaves worked on the plantation, some continuing to work for the Contee brothers when they were set free. It was a pretty hard and cruel life for the darkeys, declares the...

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Slave Narrative of “Parson” Rezin Williams

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Rezin (Parson) Williams Date of Interview: September 18 and 24, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Date of Birth: March 11, 1822 Age: 116 Place of Residence: 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, MD References: Baltimore Morning Sun, December 10, 1928. Registration Books of Board of Election Supervisors Baltimore Court House. Personal interviews with “Parson” Rezin Williams, on Thursday afternoon, September 18 and 24, 1937, at his home, 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, Md. Oldest living Negro Civil War veteran; now 116 years old. Oldest registered voter in Maryland and said to be the oldest “freeman” in the United States. Said to be oldest member of Negro family in America with sister and brother still living, more than a century old. Father worked for George Washington. In 1864 when the State Constitution abolished slavery and freed about 83,000 Negro slaves in Maryland, there was one, “Parson” Rezin Williams, already a freeman. He is now living at the age of 116 years, in Baltimore City, Maryland, credited with being the oldest of his race in the United States who served in the Civil War. He was born March 11, 1822, at “Fairview”, near Bowie, Prince Georges County, Maryland—a plantation of 1000 acres, then belonging to Governor Oden Bowie’s father. “Parson” Williams’ father, Rezin Williams, a freeman, was born at “Mattaponi”, near Nottingham, Prince Georges County, the estate...

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Biographical Sketch of William Travis Howard

Howard, William Travis; pathologist; born, Sans Souci, Statesburg, S. C.. March 13, 1867; son of John and Mary Catherine Macleod Howard; student University of Virginia, 1885-1887; M. D., University of Maryland, 1889; graduate student Johns Hopkins, 1889-1893; married at Watch Hill, R. I., Mary Cushing Williams, of Baltimore, Aug. 15, 1896; engaged in teaching and research in pathology since 1892; prof. pathology, Western Reserve University since 1894; pathologist to Lakeside, City, Charity and St. Alexis Hospitals; bacteriologist, Board of Health of Cleveland. Author of numerous papers in pathology and bacteriology; member Ass’n American Physicians, American Ass’n of Pathologists and Bacteriologists (pres. 1902); American Ass’n Anatomists, A. M. A., Academy of Medicine of Cleveland, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce (chairman committee on municipal...

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Maryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MarylandMaryland Cemetery Records, Alleghany to BaltimoreMaryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester CountiesRocky Gap Veterans Cemetery Prince George’s County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Prince George’s  County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Addison Chapel of St. Matthew’s Ammendale Cemetery Cedar Hill Cemetery Evergreen Cemetery Hamilton Family Cemetery Hilleary Family Cemetery Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery Ivy Hill Cemetery St. John’s Episcopal Church Cemetery St. Mary’s Catholic Church St. Mary’s Catholic Church Fort Lincoln Cemetery  (hosted at Interment) Queen Anne’s County Broad Creek Cemetery (hosted at Interment) Somerset County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Somerset County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Austin Family Graveyard St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Graveyard Bonneville Family Graveyard Bozman Family Graveyard Centennial United Methodist Church Cemetery Samuel Wesley United Methodist Church Cemetery , Manokin Disharoon Related Graves Fitzgerald Cemetery Harris – Overton Family Graveyard Old Palmetto Church Graveyard Robert Pollitt Family Graveyard Long – McGrath – Fitzgerald Family Graveyard Milliagan Family Graveyard Mt. Olive Methodist Church Cemetery Manokin Presbyterian Church Cemetery Mt. Vernon Cemetery Old Friendship United Methodist Church Cemetery Rock Creek Cemetery...

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Biography of Hon. Charles H. Mason

HON. CHARLES H. MASON. – Mr. Mason was born at Fort Washington, on the Potomac river, Maryland, in 1830. At the age of seven, with his widowed mother, he removed to Providence, Rhode Island. He graduated in 1850 with distinguished honors at Brown University, and was admitted to the bar of Rhode Island in 1851. On the election of President Pierce, he was recommended by the Rhode Island bar for the office of United States district attorney for that state. On the declination of the secretaryship of Washington Territory by Major Farquaharson, in September, 1853, Mr. Mason received the appointment and arrived in the territory in October, and continued in office until his death. It was, however, as acting governor of the territory through several critical periods that he distinguished himself, and endeared himself to our people. His first gubernatorial services were from March 26, 1854, to December 1st of that year. Again, when Governor Stevens went to the Blackfoot Council at Fort Benton, from May 12, 1855, he acted as governor until January 19, 1856. It was during this time that the Indian war was inaugurated; and his administration during the trying months of October, November and December was marked with energy, decision and wisdom. He immediately called for volunteers. He wisely and promptly separated the friendly from the hostile, humanely treating all Indians as friendly who were...

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