Location: Pottawattamie County IA

Biographical Sketch of Abner McCrary

Abner McCrary is a native of Union County, Illinois, born in 1835. His parents, John and Mary (Kellar) McCrary, natives of North Carolina and South Carolina respectively, moved to Hancock County in 1844. Next they moved to Wash vine, Iowa, and in 1846 to Council Bluffs, where they remained five years. In 1851 he moved to Utah, where he remained two years, and June 5, 1854, came to California, and bought forty acres of land three miles northeast of San Bernardino, where he now lives. Mr. McCrary has dealt some in buying and selling land, and has today a fine farm devoted to general farm products, fruit and vegetables. He is one of the pioneers who have borne the burden and heat of the day. He walked every step of the way from Utah to this county, not shirking a single duty on the way, and he has carried out these principles every day of his life since; he is an earnest worker and an honest citizen. In 1859 he married Miss Emma Lane, of Bowling Green, Kentucky, daughter of David and Lucinda Lane, both born in 1805. Mr. Lane died in Indiana, and Mrs. Lane still lives, at a ripe old age. She is well preserved, physically and mentally. Mr. and Mrs. McCrary have reared five children: Emeline, now Mrs. B. J. Robertson; Laura, wife of J. M....

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Biography of Danford Atwood

Danford Atwood was born in Connecticut in 1823. His parents were Mormons and moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, at an early day, and from thence to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where in 1850 Mr. Atwood married Miss Jane Garner, of Hancock County, Illinois. She was the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Hedrick) Garner, natives respectively of North Carolina and Indiana. They had six children. Mrs. Garner died in Illinois at the age of thirty-two, and Mr. Garner married Lydia Hill. In 1836 he went to Council Bluffs, where he remained nearly two years, and then came to California, in 1852, by ox team. He bought land on Lytle creek, where the woolen mill now stands, and was there for twenty years. He then sold out and went to Salt Lake, where he was killed by a runaway team August 31, 1877. After our subject’s marriage he lived at Council Bluffs ten years, where he was engaged in farming and stock raising. May 1, 1860, he left Council Bluffs, crossing the plains to California, and arrived in San Bernardino December 1 of the same year. Here he bought land, which he held two years and then sold. He then bought 100 acres of land in Warm creek district, where he now lives, built a comfortable residence and has done a good dairying business, also stock-raising and general farming for several years. They...

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Biographical Sketch of John Bottoms

John Bottoms was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1812, and came to America in 1840; he landed at New Orleans, and from there went to Nauvoo, Illinois, where he was a member of the Mormon Church. He remained there until 1845, when he went to Cincinnati and worked in a bucket factory for about three years. In 1848 he went to Council Bluffs and remained there until 1852. He then went to Salt Lake City and remained there until 1858, when he came to California. During this time he had had prolonged trouble with the Mormons and concluded to stand their arbitrary treatment no longer: hence he crossed the plains to California. He worked in Los Angeles County for a while and then came to San Bernardino County, where he purchased a ranch, on which he has resided ever since. He was married in Cincinnati, in 1847, to Miss Althea Ugle, a native of that city, of German descent. Mr. Bottoms is one of the first settlers in this valley, has been an honest and upright citizen, and is respected by all who know...

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Biography of Joseph Camp Thorn

Joseph Camp Thorn, residing four miles east of San Bernardino on the Base Line, is one of the pioneers of this county. He was born in New York, January 2, 1839, the son of Joseph and Lorana (Camp) Thorn. When the subject of this sketch was three years of age his father moved to Nauvoo, Illinois. The next year he removed to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and the following year he moved to Salt Lake. Our subject was then eight years old and he drove an ox team all the way from Council Bluffs to Salt Lake. Mr. Thorn lived at Salt Lake for ten days and, disgusted with the Mormon religion, went back to Iowa; then came on, in 1854, to California. The subject of this sketch, then a lad of fourteen, drove his ox team from Salt Lake to San Bernardino. While on the journey he stood a regular herd and guard tower with the men. After his arrival here he worked at various occupations, and in 1858 was married to Miss Mary H. Dickson, born in Iowa. Her parents, David and Nancy (Stevens) Dickson, natives of Canada, crossed the plains in 1853, losing a man and nearly all their stock by Indians, and located at San Bernardino. At one time Mr. Dickson owned the block where the Stewart Hotel now stands, and other valuable property. He died...

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Biography of Joseph Thorn

Joseph Thorn, deceased, was a pioneer of 1854. He was born in New York State, December 22, 1811. His parents were Richard and Mary Ann (Armstrong) Thorn, the former a native of New York, the latter of England. Mr. Thorn was a blacksmith by trade. He was married at Niles, New York, June 19, 1836, to Lorana Camp, daughter of Jonah and Barbara (Keith) Camp, from near New Haven, Connecticut. About seven years after his marriage he moved with his wife and four children to Hancock County, Illinois, where he lived five years. He then moved to Council Bluffs and staid one year, when he joined the Mormons and went to Salt Lake. He soon got sick of them, however, and went back to Iowa where he remained six years. He then moved to California, starting from Iowa in 1853. He spent one winter in Salt Lake, and in June 1854, arrived in San Bernardino. In February he went to Stockton with stock, came back the same year, and bought fifty acres of land where the Santa Fe Railroad tracks are now located, which was nearly all wild and unimproved. He bought land also on Warm creek, and dealt considerably in stock and engaged in farming. He was an energetic and enterprising man and gave each of his children a good farm. He had served as Supervisor and was...

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Biography of Joseph Hancock

Joseph Hancock, a rancher near San Bernardino, was born near Cleveland, Ohio, in 1822, and is the son of Solomon and Alta (Adams) Hancock, natives of Massachusetts and Vermont respectively. His father was born in 1793, and his mother in 1795, and were of English descent. The great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 1It has come to our attention via a visitor to this page, that this information is incorrect. John Hancock’s two children died young, so he could have had no great-grandchildren. She further states the following to provide clearer information on the ancestry of Joseph Hancock: “This Joseph’s grand father was Thomas4 wife Amy Ward and his great grandfather was Thomas Hancock3 married to Jeminna Wright… spelled a couple of ways but the children still the same. His GG grandfather was John Hancock2 wife Anna (Annie) Webb and his his GGG grandfather was Thomas1 and wife Rachel Leonard.” Communication of Patricia Vermette via AccessGenealogy Facebook Page. His paternal great-grandmother was the daughter of General Ward. Solomon Hancock was a frontiersman in the Buckeye State, a farmer, but in his early days spent much time in hunting deer and wild turkey, with which the country abounded. His father, Thomas Hancock, entered the Revolutionary War at the age of fourteen years. When the subject of this sketch was...

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Biography of Edward P. Cadwell

EDWARD P. CADWELL. – This substantial capitalist of Washington, and leading member of the legal profession of Tacoma, was born in Independence, Iowa, December 23, 1855, and was the son of Carlos C. and Emily E. (Ross) Cadwell, his mother having been a sister of Chief Justice Ross of Vermont. He resided in his native town, where he attended a public school, and in his seventeenth year entered the Iowa State Agricultural College, graduating as civil engineer in 1875. Returning home, he became principal for one year of the grammar department of the high school at Independence. Upon the completion of this task, he entered Simpson’s Law College of Des Moines, Iowa, form which he graduated in1877. On receiving his degree, he located in Logan, Iowa, and began the practice of his profession. Two years later he removed to Council Bluffs, where he built up a large business. Learning of the possibilities of the greater West, he came in 1885 to Washington, locating at Tacoma, where he opened an office and invested largely in real estate, from which he has reaped a golden harvest. In 1887 Mr. Cadwell for a time made Ellensburgh his home, and while there purchased a large amount of valuable real estate, among which was the well-known Johnson Hotel, a large three-story frame building. In 1888 he built as an addition a beautiful three-story brick,...

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Nippert, Charles Elsworth – Obituary

Charles Elsworth Nippert, son of George and Sarah Nippert, was born at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, November 18, 1863, and died at his home in Galva, Iowa, January 5, 1942, having attained the age of 78 years, one month, and 18 days. He came to northwest Iowa in early manhood when it was still raw prairie and a part of the national frontier. At the age of ten years, he came with his parents in a covered wagon. The family settled near Minden in Pottawattamie County, and it was there he grew to manhood. He was married to Elizabeth Hessler of Prairie du Sac on March 4, 1889. They came at once to Iowa and started farming near Shelby, Ia. A year later they came to the Galva, Iowa, vicinity where they continued the occupation of farming. They retired from the farm in 1922 and moved to Galva, where he then made his home. To this union were born four children, two boys and two girls. He was preceded in death by his wife on September 15, 1938, and by his son, Lawrence, on December 11, 1935. Besides raising and caring for his own family, he and his wife took three orphaned nephews, for whom they made a home and cared for as their own. In the home, he was a true and loving husband and a kind father....

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