Location: Portland Oregon

Biography of Alexander Duffes

The pretty, flourishing town of Nampa, Canyon County, was founded about thirteen years ago by Alexander Duffes, who has made his home here continuously since the nth of November, 1885, and has given his most earnest efforts toward the development and improvement of the town. At that time the railroad had been constructed through this section and a small station had been built at Nampa. Mr. Duffes, passing through, on his way to his old home in Canada, saw the possibilities of the place as a location for a town, and decided to cast his lot here. He obtained a quarter section of land of the government and laid part of it out into town lots, investing considerable money in improvements. He donated building sites to various denominations for churches, set aside a block for a schoolhouse, and in many ways pro-vided for the advancement of the citizens. His wisdom and foresight have been abundantly proven: the town has steadily grown, and it is now one of the most promising locations in the County. Many of the substantial business blocks and residences here were built by Mr. Duffes, and are monuments to his good taste and skill. A native of the state of New York, Alexander Duffes was born on the 26th of March 1839, in the town of Utica. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Ferrier) Duffes, were both...

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Biography of Charles F. Leland

Charles F. Leland, coming to Lewiston in his boyhood, has spent almost his entire life in this beautiful and prosperous city of northern Idaho where he is now serving as general stage agent and also as agent for the Northern Pacific Express Company. He was born in Portland, Oregon, November 5, 1858, and in 1864 removed to Lewiston with his parents. His father Alonzo Leland, was born in Springfield, Vermont, July 12, 1818, and in the public schools acquired his education. At the age of sixteen he began to earn his own living by teaching, which profession he followed for two years, in the meantime doing what he could to fit himself for a higher education. He subsequently spent three years as a student in the New Hampshire State Academy, and for a similar period continued his education in Brown University, graduating with honor in the class of 1843. During the acquirement of his education he maintained himself by working during vacations at the carpenter’s trade. After the completion of his collegiate course he engaged in teaching in Maryland and in Massachusetts for a number of years, but becoming aware of the great possibilities of the growing west he resolved to try his fortune on the Pacific coast. By way of the isthmus of Panama he proceeded to Portland, Oregon, where he arrived in October, 1850, and having acquired...

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Biography of Franz L. Koehler

The sturdy German element in our national commonwealth has been one of the most important factors in furthering the substantial and normal advancement of the country, for this is an element signally appreciative of practical values and also of the higher intellectuality which transcends all provincial confines. Well may any person take pride in tracing his lineage to such a source. As one of the able and enterprising citizens whom the German Fatherland has contributed to the United States, and as one of the prominent and progressive citizens of the flourishing town of Moscow, Latah County, Idaho, Franz Louis Koehler is worthy of distinct recognition in this work. Mr. Koehler is a native of the province of Bavaria, Germany, where he was born on the 8th of October 1859, coming of stanch old German stock. He received his educational discipline in the excellent schools of the Fatherland and there instituted his association with the practical affairs of life by learning the brewing business, a line of enterprise in which the sons of the German empire have ever been the leaders. He was employed in the leading breweries of his native land, becoming thoroughly familiar with every detail of the business and with the methods employed to secure the maximum excellence in products. Finally determining to try his fortunes in the New World, Mr. Koehler embarked for the United States...

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Biography of Hon. George B. Rogers

Some men achieve success almost instantaneously, some by slow accretion, others only after long and patient working and waiting. The experience of men who are willing to work persistently and intelligently and wait calmly goes to prove that success may surely be attained during an ordinary lifetime, and no man not cut off at an untimely age need work and wait in vain. These reflections have been suggested by a consideration of the career of Hon. George B. Rogers, receiver of the United States land office at Blackfoot, Idaho, who is one of the most prominent and successful citizens of the state. He was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, February 22, 1842. His father, John Rogers, was born in England and there married Miss Hannah Bailey. They came to the United States in 1837, bringing with them two daughters, named Susan and Elizabeth, and located at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where Mr. Rogers engaged in lead-mining and later became a farmer. He died in 1880, aged seventy-six years, and his wife passed away in 1882, aged seventy-three. They were lifelong members and supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church. Six more children were born to them in Wisconsin, of whom George B. Rogers was the second in order of nativity and of whom two others are living. George B. Rogers was brought up on his father’s farm and at a...

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Biography of Harlan P. Ustick, A. M., M. D.

The medical profession in Boise is ably represented by Dr. Harlan Page Ustick, a prominent homeopathic physician, who was born in Fayette county, Ohio, on the 26th of November, 1848. His paternal grandfather was a Baptist minister, who, leaving his home in France, crossed the Atlantic to New York City, where he passed the residue of his days. His son, William Arnold Ustick, the father of the Doctor, was born in Orange County. New York, in the year 1800, and when seventeen years of age removed to Ohio, where he resided until he laid down the burdens of life, in his ninetieth year. He married Miss Mary Stewart, a native of Maryland, and a descendant of the royal house of Stuart, of England. Mr. Ustick resided upon a farm and was accounted one of the industrious and practical agriculturists of his community. In later years he also engaged in buying and selling wool on an extensive scale, and won success in his undertakings. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and his life was actuated by noble principles and characterized by kindly deeds. Uncompromisingly opposed to oppression of every form, his home became a station on the famous Underground Railroad in antebellum days, and he aided many a poor Negro on his way to freedom. He died in his ninetieth year, and his wife passed...

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Biography of Aaron Freidenrich

Aaron Freidenrich, one of the most prominent merchants of Grangeville, and the managing member of the firm of Alexander & Freidenrich, wholesale and retail dealers in general merchandise, is in control of the largest establishment of the kind in the town, and perhaps no town of equal proportion in the entire country can boast of a better or more extensive store. The success of this enterprise is due to him whose name begins this sketch, a most energetic and progressive man, whose sound judgment is supplemented by industry and honorable methods. These qualities have brought to him a most creditable prosperity and have gained him a place in the foremost ranks of the commercial interests of northern Idaho. Mr. Freidenrich has been a resident of this state for thirty-one years. He was born in Germany on the 24th of February 1851, a son of Isaac and Caroline (Adler) Freidenrich. Many of the representatives of the name were German merchants, and in religious faith the family were Hebrews. In the land of his nativity the subject of this sketch acquired his education, and also became familiar with business methods by acting as salesman in a mercantile establishment. He was only seventeen years of age when he emigrated to the United States, hoping to better his financial condition in the land where every opportunity is afforded the man of ability, ambition...

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Biography of Edmond Pearcy

Edmond Pearcy, whose history is one of close connection with the pioneer development of the state as well as its latter-day progress and prosperity was born in Bedford County, Virginia, on the 22d of March 1832, and is of Scotch and Dutch descent. His ancestors were early settlers of Virginia, and for many years the families were represented in Bedford County. His father, Nicholas Pearcy, was born there, and having arrived at years of maturity he married Rebecca Hardy, a native of Maryland. They became the parents of twelve children, eleven sons and one daughter, and of the number but three are now living. Edmond Pearcy was the youngest of the family. He was reared on his father’s farm and received a common-school education in his native state, after which he taught school for one term. In 1852, at the age of twenty years, he started for California, but arrived in Missouri too late to join an emigrant train en route for the Golden state, and consequently spent the winter with a relative in Pike county, Missouri. In the spring of 1853 he started with a company of sixteen. They drove a band of cattle across the plains and mountains to California, but on reaching the mountains were greatly retarded by the deep snows, and were without food for two days. It was the middle of November when they...

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Biography of John Hallenbeck

In March 1864, John Hallenbeck became a resident of Silver City, and from that time until his death, throughout the period of pioneer development and latter-day progress, he was prominently identified with its upbuilding and interests. A native of the Empire state, he was born in Albany, October 24, 1830, and was of Holland lineage. His ancestors were among the early settlers of New York and participated in the events which form the colonial and Revolutionary history of that state. The maternal grand-father of our subject was also one of the heroes of the war for independence, and his wife afterward received a pension in recognition of his services. He lived to be seventy-eight years of age, while her death occurred when she had attained the advanced age of eighty-seven. Mathew Hallenbeck, the father of our subject, was born in New York, and married Catharine Shoudy, a native of the same state. He devoted his energies to many pursuits, having been a carpenter and joiner, also a teacher of music and a teacher in the public schools. In 1841 he removed with his family to Syracuse, New York, and in 1854 to Cordova, Illinois, where he resided up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1878. Both he and his wife were members of the Dutch Reformed church, and they had a family of twelve children, nine...

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Biography of Marcus A. Means

The successful career of Marcus Asbury Means, of Genesee, is an illustration of the trite saying that brains and perseverance will make their way against all obstacles. Yet it is the multiplication of this illustration in all parts of our country that makes America one of the great powers of the earth. Mr. Means may be said to have been a child of war. He was born at Seabrook, Illinois, October 16, 1862, while his father was fighting for the preservation of the Union on southern battlefields, a service in which he yielded up his life in defense of his country. Mr. Means is of Scotch-English ancestry. His grandfather, Collin Means, from England, settled in Virginia and was the progenitor of the family in the United States. He removed to McLean County, Illinois, in 1829, and his son, Joseph Kefer Means, was born in Virginia and reared in Illinois, a good combination for the promotion of patriotism. Joseph K. Means married Matilda Rankin, also of Scotch-English descent. When the civil war came he was well established in life and had an interesting family. He enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Sixteenth Illinois Volunteers, September 6, 1862, and he died, of a disease contracted in the service, at Walnut Hill, Mississippi, January 15, 1863. It is indeed glorious for a man to die for the land he loves, but...

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Biography of Walter Hoge

Walter Hoge is one of the most prominent representatives of the industrial interests of southeastern Idaho. He makes his home in Paris, where he is connected with the lumber business, both manufacturing and selling lumber. The volume of his trade enables him to furnish employment to a large force of workmen and thus he adds to the general prosperity of the community and to the welfare of the town. Mr. Hoge was born on the 18th of November 1844, and is of English lineage. His parents, Walter and Elizabeth Hoge, were also natives of the same land, and the father supported his family by working at the blacksmith’s trade. In his religious belief he was a Presbyterian, and died in that faith in 1866, when sixty-six years of age. His wife long survived him and departed this life in 1882, when eighty-three years of age. They were the parents of eleven children, but only four are yet living. Mr. Hoge, of this review, the youngest of the family, accompanied his parents on their removal to Scotland in his early boyhood and was there educated. He served for four years as an apprentice to the butcher’s trade and followed that business until his emigration to America in 1862. Having come to the New World he took up his abode on Vancouver’s Island and began work in the mines of British...

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Biography of Thomas J. Huff

One of the pioneers of the northwest and one of the old residents of Caldwell is Thomas Jefferson Huff, the present assessor of Canyon County. He is a man of the highest integrity and ability, and stands well in the estimation of all who know him. A lifelong Democrat, and devoted to his party, he has never occupied a public office before, and has not been an aspirant for political honors and emoluments. In his business career he has met with success, and by well directed energy and good judgment he has amassed a comfortable fortune. Philip Huff, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born in Germany, and coming to America in early manhood, settled in Tennessee. In that state his son Jefferson, father of Thomas J. Huff, was born, and for some years he made his home in Indiana. He married Lutilda White, and twelve children were born to them. In 1852 the family set out on a long and dangerous journey across the almost interminable plains, seeking for a new home and better prospects. The year was an especially trying one, as the cholera was raging in this country, and the emigrants along the way appeared to be favorite subjects of attack by the dread enemy to life. Four of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Huff succumbed and were buried on the dreary plains. Newly...

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Farnsworth, Ellen Idolette Gates – Obituary

McMinnvile–July 5 (Special)–Mrs. Ellen Idolette Farnsworth, 78, died June 28 [1945] in McMinnville. Services were held at Macy’s Chapel Tuesday and interment was at Multnomah Cemetery in Portland. Mrs. Farnsworth was born in Portland, May 6, 1867. She is survived by two brothers, Alonzo B. Gates and Frank H. Gates of Portland. The Oregonian, July 6, 1945 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Bilyeu, Emma C. Brown – Obituary

The rosary will be recited at 10 a.m. June 16, 1994, followed by Mass at Holy Redeemer Church. Interment will be in Willamette National Cemetery. Mrs. Bilyeu, of southwest Portland, died June 10 of causes related to age. She was 99. She was born Jan. 8, 1895, in DeLamar, Idaho, and moved to Portland in 1915. She was a 50-year member of Holy Redeemer Church. Her husband, C. Lloyd, died in 1967. Surviving are her daughter, Cathryn M. Jiroch of Tigard; six grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-granddaughter. Remembrances: American Cancer Society or American Heart Association. Arrangements: Zeller Chapel of the...

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Chastain, Joel Orange – Obituary

Joel O. Chastain, 67, a life-long resident of Tygh Valley where he was a dairyman and farmer, died Wednesday [May 17, 1961] in Portland after a long illness. Mr. Chastain was a member of the Tygh Valley Methodist Church and the Old Wasco County Pioneer Association. Surviving are his widow, Laura, of Tygh Valley; a daughter, Mrs. Nina Teschner, and two grandchildren, Tonya and Jola Teschner of Portland; three brothers, Frank of Yakima, John of Newport and Liberty Chastain of Harper, Ore.; and two sisters, Mrs. Effie Knighten and Mrs. Nina New, both of Harper. Funeral services under direction of Spencer & Libby will be Tuesday at 2 p.m. at the Tygh Valley Methodist Church, the Rev. John Luebke officiating. Interment will be at the Tygh Valley IOOF Cemetery [Wasco Co.] The Dalles Chronicle, May 18, 1961 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Lilly, Alfred – Obituary

Lostine Resident Killed in Portland Alfred Lilly, old time resident and uncle of Mrs. Eva Quesenberry of Lostine, was electrocuted near his home in Portland, Wednesday. He was helping to put up a radio and the aerial came in contact with a live wire. Death was instantaneous. His body was taken to Lostine Saturday where the Odd Fellows laid him to rest in the Lostine cemetery. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, January 28,...

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