Location: Portland Oregon

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Leo J. Flanagan

Dr. Leo J. Flanagan, one of the county’s well-known physicians and surgeons, is located in South San Francisco where he has been practicing for the past year. Before moving into this county Dr. Flanagan had a large practice in San Francisco. Dr. Flanagan is another of the young professional men who has been attracted to San Mateo County by the wonderful opportunities that the future holds. He sees a great period of growth and prosperity ahead for South San Francisco and his confidence in this era of development was such that he gave up a flourishing practice in San Francisco to come into this territory comparatively unknown and establish himself. Dr. Flanagan is a native of California. He was born at Napa on August 6, 1885 where he took the first steps in preparation for his professional career. After graduating from Santa Clara College Dr. Flanagan finished the medical course at Johnstown University at Washington, D. C. For several years he was resident physician at St. Mary’s Hospital and Mary’s Help Hospital in San Francisco and was also with the San Francisco emergency service. Dr. Flanagan has many fraternal connections. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Eagles, the Redmen and the Foresters. He was married in Portland in...

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Keith, Lyall – Obituary

Lyall Keith of Box 300, Walton, passed away February 9, 1970 at the age of 66. He was born November 13, 1903 in Portland, Oregon and had resided in Lane County for the past 31 years. He was united in marriage to Edith Bilyeu, December 24, 1930 in Albany, Oregon. Besides his wife, he is survived by a half brother, Gordon Keith of Eureka, California; several aunts and uncles. He was a member of the Eugene Moose Lodge. Funeral services will be held in the Poole-Larsen Chapel Thursday, February 12th at 3 p.m. with private cremation to follow. [Interment Pine Grove Cemetery] Eugene Register-Guard, February 10, 1970 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Bean, Ormond Robert – Obituary

Retired Portland City Commissioner Ormond R. Bean, 89, a 31-year servant in city, state and federal governments, died early Friday morning [February 14, 1975] in the Parkview Nursing Home. Death was due to natural causes, said his son, Ormond Bean, Jr. First elected to the Portland City Council in 1932, the elder Bean served from 1933 until 1939 when he was appointed Oregon Public Utility Commissioner. From 1943 until 1946, Mr. Bean was a transportation director in America’s World War II effort, serving in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Middle East. Returning to Portland, he was elected once more to the City Council, serving from 1949 until his retirement in 1967. A former Portland City Hall employee, when asked why she considered Ormond R. Bean as her favorite city commissioner, said it was because “he was a man who never lost his temper nor raised his voice.” The description aptly summed up Bean who also had a long-standing reputation for his honest and integrity. He was often referred to as “the financial watchdog of City Hall.” Bean, who died early Friday at the age of 89, was once described as “the best public servant Portland ever had,” by Mark Grayson, a longtime colleague on the council. Grayson, who retired in 1970, served as Bean’s administrative assistant before running for the commission. “Ormond was a great gentleman and a fine...

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Portland Oregon’s Ships and Commerce

Many vessels crossed the bar of the Columbia in 1849 and a number came up to Portland. Of these none was more serviceable than the Madonna, from New York, under Captain Couch. This was his third trip out, and by far the most successful. His cargo of mixed goods was disposed of in part at San Francisco, his lumber selling for $600 per thousand. On board were W. S. Ogden, a prominent merchant of early times, and G. H. Flanders, a sea captain, before this in the employ of John and Caleb Cushing. Capt. Flanders is a man whose energy and enterprise have done much for Portland’s commerce. Reaching the city once more, Couch had his land surveyed and platted. It is said that in laying off a street he gave his half for the use of the public, but Stark refused to meet him half way; thus making A street but half width. It is also reported that upon the surveyor finishing the job, worth about $700, Couch offered him for his pay, two blocks on Second and Third streets-which were refused. The Madonna was run on the route to San Francisco by Flanders, and the firm of Couch & Co. were so prosperous as to be able to dispatch in 1850 the brig Emma Preston to China-the first from Oregon to China. The unfavorable condition of steam navigation, already mentioned, which supplied Milwaukie...

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Biography of Simon Edward Josephi, M.D.

Simeon Edward Josephi was born in the city of New York on December 3, 1849. His father, Edward Josephi, was a native of St. Petersburg, Russia, but left that country with his parents for England when a boy. He afterwards came to New York, where he embarked in the jewelry business, becoming a prominent wholesale jeweler of that city and San Francisco. Returning to New York from a trip to the latter city, he was lost in the burning of the ill-fated steamer Golden Gate in 1862. The mother of Doctor Josephi is a native of England. She is one of the Spanish Mandoza family, her father having emigrated from his native country prior to her birth. Doctor Josephi spent his early life in the city of his birth, and there received his literary education, chiefly in the public school. In 1863 he graduated from the grammar school. In 1863 he graduated from the grammar school and entered what was then known as the Free Academy (now the New York College) on Lexington avenue. After pursuing his studies there for a year, he accepted a clerkship in a mercantile house. Possessed with a desire to see the great West, he embarked for San Francisco on the steamer, Santiago de Cuba, via the Nicaragua route, arriving in California in September, 1866. In January, 1867, he came to Portland, Oregon, to...

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Biography of Capt. Henry Roeder

CAPT. HENRY ROEDER. – In this veteran of the early times, as well as of the war of 1856, we have a representative of the men who first opened business on the Sound. As such he merits somewhat extended notice. He was born in Germany on July 4, 1824, his parents being John and Martha Roeder. He is connected by family ties with the great European events of the early part of the century, his father having been a soldier under Napoleon, and having fought in the battle of Waterloo. Not wishing to bear arms for Louis, nor rear his son to fight his battles, he with his family came to America when Henry was but seven years of age, and settled at Vermilion, Ohio. The nautical experience of the young man began on Lake Erie; and before he was twenty he was master of a schooner. In 1849 the gold fever of California reached his locality; and he made up his mind to take a run out to the mines, and be back in a year’s time and take charge of a fine vessel in process of construction on the Vermilion river. It was twenty-two years before he had seen enough of the West to think of looking back again to life on the lake. The journey was begun February 23, 1850. The two six-mules teams, two wagons...

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Biography of Esdras N. Ouimette

ESDRAS N. OUIMETTE. – A portrait of Mr. Ouimette is placed in this work as a representative business man of Tacoma, Washington, and as one who located and pinned his faith to the City of Destiny in the early stages of its organization. Mr. Ouimette is a native of the province of Quebec, Canada, and was born in St. Eustache June 6, 1838. He was educated at the common schools, afterwards graduating from the St. Eustache College. He resided in his birthplace until twenty-two years of age. In 1860 he went to Montreal and engaged as clerk in a general merchandise store, where he remained for nearly five years. He then concluded to seek his fortune in the golden West, and came to Portland, Oregon, in the latter part of 1865,where he first found employment with the well-known dry-goods house of Jacob & Meyer. One year later he engaged in business for himself in Portland, where he remained until 869. He then removed his stock of goods to Olympia, Washington Territory, where for the following ten years he conducted a large and prosperous business. While in Olympia, Mr. Ouimette was looked upon as one of the most enterprising citizens of the Capital city, and held the office of Mayor of Olympia for two terms. Our subject was one of the first projectors, and mainly instrumental in the building, of...

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Biography of Bethina Angelina Owens-Adair

MRS. DR. OWENS-ADAIR. – Berthina Angelina, the second daughter of Thomas and Sarah Owens, was born February 7,1840, in Van Buren county, Missouri. She saw her fourth birthday in her father’s Western home on Clatsop Plains, Clatsop county, Oregon, her parents having made the then dangerous and tedious journey across the then dangerous and tedious journey across the plains with ox-teams in the summer and fall of 1843. At this time Berthina was a small child, delicate in stature for her age, and having a highly nervous and sensitive nature, but with a strong, vigorous constitution, thus early showing a good physical foundation for great perseverance and endurance. The country reached by her parents was new to them, and virtually unoccupied, save by Indians. It was a wilderness unbroken by the means and appliances of our civilization, with no visible evidence of its immediate settlement and development. If it were a nice thing to do for these elder people to leave their old established homes, social relations and open markets, thousands of miles away, and come into this new land, from which they could not return, their experience at the end of the journey taught them that they had retraced their steps in their lives to what appeared to be a childish adventure, and to a place where a child might lead them. This young girl was now as...

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Biography of Hon. Peter Paquet

HON. PETER PAQUET – This pioneer of 1852, who is the son of F.X. Paquet and Marie Louise Lannadier de Langdeau, was born in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, on the 13th of January, 1839. He received an education in the private and public schools of St. Louis. In the spring of 1852 he left the city of St. Louis with his parents, who had determined to emigrate to Oregon, the family then consisting of father, mother and six children. They came up the Missouri river on the old steamer Timour No. 2, and in eight days reached the town of St. Joseph, where they completed the outfit. Sometime in the month of May, with their ox-teams and wagons laden with the provisions for the trip, they took their lives and fortunes in their hands, and started to cross the great American desert, known as the plains. They pursued their journey without particular incident or accident, barring the usual sickness and privations which were the lot of most of the emigrants of that year, until they reached the crossing of Snake river. Here some rascally traders had established themselves for the purpose of swindling the tired emigrant, and buying the running gear of his wagons, after persuading him that he could get into a boat, conjured out of an old wagon-bed caulked up tight with rags, and that...

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Biography of Marion Francis Mulkey

MARION FRANCIS MULKEY.- This gentleman, the eldest son of Johnson Mulkey, and who took up, and conducted in the spirit, and to some extent in the method, the pioneer activities of his father, was born in Johnson county, Missouri, November 14, 1836. He was therefore but a boy of ten when, in 1847, he accompanied his father across the continent to Oregon. His, however, was one of those old heads on young shoulders; and so responsible was he, and so capable of affairs, that he was intrusted with the driving of oxen, and all work adapted to his strength, with the same confidence as a grown man. Upon arriving in Oregon and beginning life anew on the Donation claim in Benton county, he played his part in felling timber, breaking and fencing land, and erecting the frontiersman’s temporary buildings as vigorously as anyone in the family. He early drew from his parents a desire for education, and after his first essays in learning at the log schoolhouse, under the tuition of such men as Senator J.H. Slater, and Honorable Philip Ritz, was eager to take advantage of the assistance furnished by his father to pursue higher studies at Forest Grove, under the guidance of the late Doctor S.H. Marsh. This assistance he supplemented by labor of his own, following the traditional method of the youth ambitious of self-improvement, -teaching...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Smith

This worthy pioneer and substantial citizen of Malheur County, is deserving of a place in any compilation that purports to give the history of this section, since his labors have been here for many years toward the development and progress of the country, and since he is a man of ability and has achieved a goodly success as the reward of his labors and thrift. Mr. Smith was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on October 18, 1835, being the son of John and Susan Smith. At the age of eight he went with his parents to Illinois and there remained until 1854, when he came across the plains with his brothers, in an ox train, to Siskiyou County, California, and there engaged in mining. He made some good discoveries and later, 1858, went to the Cariboo mines at the time of the Fraser river excitement, whence he returned to Portland, then to Salem, and there followed his trade of brick mason. In 1878 he removed to Jackson County and remained three years and then vent to Mugginsville, California, where he mined until 188o. The next year he came to Malheur County, and located the place where he now lives as a homestead, ten miles northwest from Rockville, and devoted himself to farming and stock raising. His place is under the irrigating ditch and well improved and he has a good...

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Biography of Robert M. Divin

This venerable citizen and esteemed gentleman and resident of Vale is one of the substantial men of Malheur County and is well and favorably known throughout the precincts of this region, being a man of stanch integrity, and always manifesting those qualities of worth and merit that redound to the good of all. Mr. Divin was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, on December 17, 1831, being the son of Irbin F. and Hannah Divin. The father died when our subject was two years of age, having removed with the family to Washington County, Arkansas, where the death occurred. There were but few settlers in that section then, and there Robert M. lived and attended school in the rough log houses of the time, gaining a training there from which fortified him for the battle of life. He remained with his mother until he had reached the age of manhood, and in 151 he married Miss Mary J. Kellam, a native of Little Rock, Arkansas. He was occupied on a farm until 186o, then removed to the frontier of Texas among the savage Commanche Indians. Here Mr. Divin and his family endured hardships and deprivations and sufferings from the savages that are calculated to dry up the cup of joy from the human breast, but they bravely fought their way through them all. The father for three years being a...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank O’Neill

The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O’Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the “Harvest Queen.” a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O’Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. “thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were horn to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Loran and Francis P. In 1882, very soon...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Cawlfield

This worthy gentleman is to be numbered with the younger men of Harney county who have attained a good success in the stock business here and who bid fair to gain much better in the future, judging by their faithful and wisely bestowed labors of the past. George W. was born in Johnson county, Kansas, on October 21, 1870, being the son of David A. and Abigil (Evans) Cawlfield. The father was a native of Tennessee, and went across the plains to California in an early day and then returned via Panama, after which for some time he acted as government freighter on the frontiers and finally settled in Kansas. In 1874 the family came overland to Pueblo county, Colorado, and there the father followed stock raising. In 1888 the father, with his wife and ten children, came by covered wagons to Harney and settled on Rye Grass flat, east from Burns, and there engaged in raising stock. Our subject attended schools in various places of his residence, and in 1891 he went to Portland and acted as express messenger and baggageman to two different points on the O. R. & N. This continued for two years, and he returned to Harney county, and there, on November 24, 1897, he married Miss Hattie, daughter of Jesse O. and Emma Bunyard. To them have been born two children -Gladys R.,...

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Biographical Sketch of James P. Dickenson

James P. Dickenson has gained a good success in material things in Harney county since his advent here and is one of the substantial and leading stockmen and farmers to-day. He and his family have two good hay farms near the Narrows and also three near Lawen. These fine tracts of land return him annually large amounts of hay and give him opportunity to handle many head of stock. James P. was born in Grayson county, Virginia, on February 18, 1842, being the son of John and Rosa (Hale) Dickenson. He grew up on the farm and gained his education from the common schools, and in the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Company C, Forty-fifth Virginia, as second lieutenant under General John B. Floyd. He was in the battles of Wytheville, Parisburg, Big Sewell Mountain and Carnifax Ferry, besides many skirmishes. At the end of the year for which he enlisted he retired from the army and went home and was chosen tax collector for Grayson county. Eighteen months later he enlisted in the Twenty-second Virginia Cavalry and took part in the battles of Lynchburg and Luray valley, at which last place his horse was shot from under him and he was captured. He languished in the war prison at Point Lookout, Maryland, until the close of the war, July, 1865. The treatment was sever in the prison....

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