Location: Portage des Sioux

Treaty of September 14, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Fox Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Fox tribe or nation. Article 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at Fort Clark, on the Illinois river, to be by him restored to their respective nations as soon...

Read More

Treaty of September 16, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned, King, Chiefs, and Warriors, of the Iaway [Iowa] Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties against the other shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States and all the individuals composing the said Iaway tribe or nation. Article III. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands, (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at St. Louis, to be by him restored to their respective nations, as soon as it may be...

Read More

Treaty of September 2, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and Deputies, of the Kickapoo Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties towards the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Kickapoo tribe or nation. Article 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession) to the officer commanding at Fort Clarke, on the Illinois river, to be by him restored to their respective nations as soon as it may...

Read More

Treaty of July 20, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the Chiefs and Warriors of the Mahas, on the part and behalf of said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the tribe or nation of the Mahas, and all friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their tribe or nation to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, power,...

Read More

Treaty of July 18, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Piankishaw Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being anxious of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the Piankishaw tribe or nation. Article III. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, or agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said Piankishaw tribe or nation. In witness of all and every thing herein determined between the United States of America, and the said Piankeshaw tribe or nation: we, their...

Read More

Treaty of July 19, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Portage des Sioux, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Teton Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Teeton tribe; and the friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their aforesaid tribe to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other...

Read More

Search

Free Genealogy Archives


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest