Location: Polk County TN

Biography of Andrew R. Turner

ANDREW R. TURNER, who for twenty-three years has lived near Rome, Missouri, is a native of Polk County, Tennessee, but was reared in Georgia on the Chickamauga battle-ground. His father, Joseph Turner, was born in the Old North State in 1812, and after marrying Nancy Fouts, in Tennessee, and living there until the subject of this sketch was ten years old, he removed to Georgia. His father was William Turner. Andrew R. Turner attended the common schools of Walker County, Ga., and was twenty years of age at the time of the opening of the Civil War, but he continued to attend school until 1863, being exempt under the conscript law of Georgia, but at that time he was forced to join the Confederate Army or leave the country and chose the latter alternative and went to Kentucky, where in August, 1863, he. enlisted in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, United States Army, commanded by Col. Joseph Parsons, and served the Union cause from the time of his enlistment until the war closed, becoming sergeant of his company-Company B. He was in the engagements at Cumberland Gap, Knoxville, Greenville, Morristown, and many skirmishes, and for. some time was on the sick list in the hospital at Nashville. His brother James left Georgia at the same time that he did, joining the same company, but died in the hospital in 1864,...

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Biography of Dr. John S. Stephenson

DR. JOHN S. STEPHENSON. The value to any community of a professional man is not marked merely by his learning and skill, his proficiency in medical and surgical practice, but also by his character, both private and professional, his honorable adherence to medical ethics, and his personal integrity and benevolence of purpose. When a physician combines these characteristics it is with pleasure that we record his life-work, and such a man do we find in Dr. John S. Stephenson. He owes his nativity to Polk County, Tennessee, where he was born in 1839. His parents were Dr. Andrew R. and Anna (Watson) Stephenson, born in North Carolina in 1797, and South Carolina in 1799 respectively. They were early settlers of East Tennessee, and in January, 1852, landed in Searcy County, Arkansas, the journey thither being made with ox teams and horse teams, occupying nearly four months. They were among the pioneers of Wiley’s Cove, and there improved a good farm, and spent the rest of their lives, the father’s death occurring in January, 1864, and the mother’s in 1868. They were members of the Missionary Baptist Church for many years, and the father was long a very successful practicing physician of his section of the county. He was a stanch Union man during the great Civil War, but took no active part in the struggle. His father, Joseph Stephenson,...

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Yuchi Indians

Yuchi Tribe. Significance unknown, but perhaps, as suggested by Speck (1909), from a native word meaning “those far away,” or “at a distance,” though it is also possible that it is a variant of Ochesee or Oeese, which was applied by the Hitchiti and their allies to Indians speaking languages different from their own. Also called: Ani’-Yu’tsl, Cherokee name. Chiska, probably a Muskogee translation of the name of one of their bands. Hughchee, an early synonym. Round town people, a name given by the early English colonists. Rickohockans, signifying “cavelanders” (Hewitt, in Hodge, 1907), perhaps an early name for a part of them. Tahogalewi, abbreviated to Hogologe, name given them by the Delaware and other Algonquian people. Tamahita, so called by some Indians, perhaps some of the eastern Siouans. Tsoyaha, “People of the sun,” their own name, or at least the name of one band. Westo, perhaps a name applied to them by the Cusabo Indians of South Carolina though the identification is not beyond question. Yuchi Connections. The Yuchi constituted a linguistic stock, the Uchean, distinct from all others, though structurally their speech bears a certain resemblance to the languages of the Muskhogean and Siouan families. Yuchi Location. The earliest known location of the Yuchi was in eastern Tennessee, perhaps near Manchester, but some of them extended still farther east, while others were as far west as Muscle...

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Polk County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Polk County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) Amburn Cemetery Baker’s Chapel Cemetery Columbia Annah Cemetery Columbus Cemetery Conasauga Cemetery Dickey Cemetery Liberty Cemetery Liberty Cemetery Mt. Herman United Methodist┬áChurch Cemetery (hosted at Fisher/Smith Family Tree )...

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