Location: Platt County MO

Biographical Sketch of George G. Brown

This representative agriculturist and patriotic citizen is one of the leading farmers of the vicinity of Nyssa, having a quarter section of good land, which is his family home, two miles west from that town. Mr. Brown was born in Platt County, Missouri, on January 22, 1850, being the son of George and Jemima (Harris) Brown. In March 1855 the family went to Doniphan County, Kansas and the father was one of the early settlers of that section. He was a pro-slavery advocate and was through the exciting times of that period. In 1867 they removed to Newton County, Missouri, and in 1869 the father died there. Our subject grew to manhood on a farm, gaining his education as best could be done from the scanty opportunity of the common schools, which, however, was made the most of by our subject. On March 15, 1874, in Newton County, occurred the marriage of Mr. Brown and Margaret D. Cary. In 1878 they removed to Grayson County, Texas and there Mr. Brown devoted his energies to farming and stock raising until 1886, at which time he returned to Newton County, Missouri, and two years later came thence to this country across the plains with teams and wagons. He had his wife, four children and mother on the trip and one hundred (lays were consumed in making it. They arrived at Long...

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Biography of M. A. McMonigle

M. A. MCMONIGLE. Although not one of the old settlers of Stone County, Missouri, Mr. M. A. McMonigle has been here for ten years, or since he purchased the farm where he now lives. He is thoroughgoing and progressive, and is classed among the wealthy and influential men of this section. During the short time he has resided here he has made a record for uprightness and honesty, and won the confidence of all. He is not only a prominent farmer of the county, but one of the leading stockmen as well, and his fine farm of 231 acres on White River, in the rich bottom lands, is an ornament to the county. In the Blue Grass regions of Kentucky our subject was born August 27, 1853. His parents, Aaron and Sarah (Allison) McMonigle, were natives of the same State. Both are now living in Stone County, on Indian Creek, and are much respected old people, who since 1881 have made their home in that part of the State. They remained in their native State until 1857, then moved to Platt County, Missouri, and thence to this county. Mr. McMonigle has always followed farming and is a substantial and worthy citizen. He and his estimable wife reared a large family of children, eleven in number, of whom six are now living: M. A., our subject; William, in Platt County;...

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Biography of Franklin Marion Chapin

FRANKLIN MARION CHAPIN. This prominent citizen of Winona, Missouri, owes his nativity to Overton County, Tennessee, where he first saw the light in 1837, his parents being Paul Stillman and Sarah (Harrison) Chapin (for parents’ history see sketch of John A. Chapin and John W. Garrett). He was the tenth of twelve children born to them, the other members of the family being: Mary (Garrett), of Howell County; Hiram, who died in Los Angeles, Cal.; Paul Stillman, who died in Hopkins County, Tex.; Elias H., who died in Howell County; Martha, who died in Overton County, Tennessee; John A., of Howell County; Josiah, who died in Randolph County, Arkansas; Silas J., a resident of Platt County, Missouri; Sarah, the twin sister of Silas, died in childhood; and Alsie A. and Catherine, of Howell County. The subject of this sketch received the rearing and education of the average farmer’s boy of his day; that is, he labored early and late on the farm and received very meager educational advantages, but later in life, when opportunity offered, he applied himself to his books and became a fair scholar. In 1851, at the age of thirteen, he removed to what is now Howell County, Missouri, and at the age of sixteen he began farming on his own responsibility. On the 19th of August, 1860, he was married in Greene County, Missouri, to...

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Biography of Charles E. Spooner

Charles E. Spooner. When he started upon his wage-earning career, at the age of fifteen years, Charles E. Spooner began at the bottom of the ladder in the capacity of bundle-boy in a department store. No favors were shown him, for he had no important friends or other favoring influences, but his fidelity, energy and ability won him recognition and promotion and he soon grew beyond the opportunities of his immediate environment, and from that time his advancement has been sure and steady. In 1888 he became connected with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, in a minor position and in the service of this line he has continued to the present, his position at this time being that of general auditor of the line, with headquarters at Parsons. Charles E. Spooner was born at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, March 11, 1858, and is a son of J. J. B. and Mary (Brewer) Spooner and a member of a family which originated in England and emigrated to New York during colonial days. His great-great-grandfather, William Spooner, fought as a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war, and his grandfather was “Col.” Alden Spooner, who passed his life at Brooklyn, New York, where he was publisher of the Long Island Star, a pioneer newspaper. J. J. B. Spooner, father of Charles E., was born in 1820, in Brooklyn, and...

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Biography of Robert Alexander Long

Robert Alexander Long. It is perhaps not generally known that the humble beginnings of the great Long-Bell Lumber Company was made in Kansas. The home of the corporation for a number of years has been in Kansas City, Missouri, where the splendid R. A. Long office building, one of the finest and most modern structures of its kind in the Middle West, furnishes the headquarters for the business whose operations are widespread all over the Southwest. But for forty years the retail business of the concern has been largely in Kansas and Kansas may properly claim Robert A. Long as one of its greatest business executives. On April 30, 1875, a carload of lumber was unloaded at the little town of Columbus, in Cherokee County, Kansas. It was consigned to the firm of R. A. Long & Company. This firm consisted of Robert A. Long, Victor B. Bell and Robert White. The senior member of the firm was twenty-four years of age and his partners had not yet reached their majority. The members of the firm had neither surplus capital nor bank accounts. However, Mr. Bell’s father was president of the Kansas City Savings Bank and Mr. White’s father its cashier. The bank thus gave them the best of recommendations and when cash was required loaned it to them on open account. In the original yard at Columbus, R....

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Biography of Elisha H. Rollins

Elisha H. Rollins, partner of Mr. Ireland in the proprietorship of the Ireland & Rollins Planing Mills Company, and one of the progressive and energetic business men of Fort Scott, was born March 15, 1859, on Prince Edward Island, a son of John and Mary (Harker) Rollins, natives of that place, who passed their entire lives there in agricultural pursuits. The father died in 1909, at the age of seventy-five years, while the mother passed away many years before, being forty-seven years old at the time of her demise. The fourth in a family of nine children, Elisha H. Rollins received a public school education, and in his youth learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed at his native place until 1876. In that year he came to Kansas City, Missouri, where he followed his trade for three years, and then came to Fort Scott and continued at his trade as a journeyman until he joined Mr. Ireland in the planing mill business. Like his partner, Mr. Rollins is a man of foresight and good judgment, a thorough business man, and a citizen of high character and standing. He is a republican in politics, a Presbyterian in his religious faith, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Fraternal Union. On August 30, 1886, at Fort Scott, Mr. Rollins was married to Miss Jennie...

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Biography of Samuel Allen

SAMUEL ALLEN. – This noble, whole-souled gentleman among the pioneers, who must now be reckoned with the dead was born in East Tennessee July 21, 1805. He was a son of William Allen, a soldier of the war of 1812. Soon after that conflict, Samuel was left fatherless by the death of this parent, and, with his mother and eight brothers and one sister, endured all the hardships and developed all the sturdy force of character, and still more learned the uprightness and integrity of the mountaineers of Tennessee, being nurtured – as were all the children of this family – by his mother in the love of God. When but a lad he moved with his mother and her family to Cooper county, Missouri. At the age of twenty-one he was married to Sarah, a daughter of Daniel Benson, a native of Tennessee and pioneer of Illinois. A few years after this event, so important in the life of the young man, he moved to Jackson county, Missouri, making there not only a home for himself and family, but for his mother. In 1836, he removed to Platt county, Missouri, but in 1847, having from some occult reason, which might have been hard for him to deliver, determined to cross the plains to Oregon, he made provision for his beloved mother with a younger brother, and bade her...

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Biography of Hon. James Abner Bennett

HON. JAMES ABNER BENNETT. – Our subject was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, on March 17,1808. His birthplace was a farm; and here he remained with his parents until 1830, when he moved to Boone county. He resided here for three years, and then removed to Jackson county, Missouri, near the town of Independence, and in 1839 again removed to Platt county. The following year, 1840, he was married to Miss Louisa E.R. Bane, of Weston, Missouri. Here Mr. Bennett remained, following blacksmithing and conducting a livery stable. He also acted as justice of the peace until the year 1842. There also was a son born to them, John R. Bennett. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett moved from here to Jackson county, Missouri, where they lived until 1850, in the meanwhile suffering the loss of their son, who died April 18,1848. In 1849 Mr. Bennett came on a prospecting tour to California. On his return, Mrs. Bennett made preparations and started with him for Oregon, traveling with ox-teams in company with some thirty other families, Judge Bennett being elected captain of the train. They started on May 9th, and after a wearisome journey of five months’ duration reached Oregon on October 2, 1850. They at once located on their beautiful farm near Corvallis; and, the settlers soon recognizing true worth, he was elected a senator in the territorial legislature from...

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Biographical Sketch of William Pentland

WILLIAM PENTLAND. – This town-builder and founder of Lexington was born December 26, 1825, in Fleming county, Kentucky, and removed with his parents in 1831 to Platt county, Missouri, and three years later made a new location in Buchanan county. He was there engaged in agriculture. In 1847 he made the great journey with ox-teams across the plains to Oregon, and located near the present site of Corvallis. He remained with his people in that neighborhood until 1867, receiving a good, practical education during his early days at the common schools of Corvallis. he was married in 1860 to Miss Jane Nordyke, and afterwards engaged successfully in farming and stock-raising in Benton county. In 1867 he came to Willow Creek, in Eastern Oregon, and has been identified with the stock interests of that section ever since. He has become the owner of an immense flock of sheep, having twenty thousand head, owning also a small band of horses. For the sustenance of this truly patriarchal flock, he owns fourteen thousand acres of land. In 1885 he laid out the townsite of Lexington, Oregon, and is therefore the father of that most vigorous, active prosperous and moral young city. The large agricultural section and immense grazing region tributary to that town is sufficient guarantee of its future prosperity. It is now supplied with a gristmill of a capacity of fifty...

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