Location: Pittsburg Pennsylvania

Biographical Sketch of James Richey Horner

Horner, James Richey; physician; born at Tarentum, Pa., June 7, 1861; son of Rev. Joseph and Caroline McCracken Horner; graduated, Pittsburg Central High School; M. D., Homeopathic Hospital College, Cleveland, 1883; M. D., New York Homeopathic Medical College, 1884; M. D., Western Reserve University, 1907; (hon. A. M., Allegheny College, Pa., 1885); resident surgeon Ward’s Island (N. Y.), Homeopathic Hospital, 1884; physician, 1885, and later staff obstetrician, Homeopathic Hospital, Pittsburg; general practice, Pittsburg and Allegheny, until 1896; abroad seven months, 1896; assistant to Hughlings Jackson, neurologist Queen’s Square Hospital, London; special study diseases of nervous system; asst. physician, staff of State Homeopathic Hospital for the Insane, New York, 1897; now in exclusive practice in mental and nervous diseases; was registrar and prof. neurology and electro-therapeutics, now prof. psychiatry and insanity. Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College; was neurologist and pres. of staff, Huron Street Hospital, sec’y and editor official journal American Institute of...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Murray Kilgore

Kilgore, Robert Murray; dist. sales mgr. Jones & Laughlin Steel Co.; born, Pittsburg, June 14, 1877; son of Jesse B. and Mary Barker Kilgore; educated, public schools and Penn State College (B. A.); married, Pittsburg, 1900, Bertha Wallace; issue, two sons and three daughters, James, Jesse, Robert, EIizabeth and Ruth; with Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. since January, 1898 (no other employer); appointed mgr. of sales Cleveland district, January, 1908; member Kappa Sigma, Union, and Mayfield Clubs, Chamber of Commerce; Royal Arch...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick Ingham Kennedy

Kennedy, Frederick Ingham; coal and vessel business; born, Erie, Pa., Nov. 10, 1866; son of Silas E. and Belle Ingham Kennedy; educated, public schools and Erie Academy; graduated, class of 1884; married, Erie, Pa., Sept. 10, 1889, Madeline Hammond; issue, one daughter, Dorothy, one son, Frederick I., Jr.; commenced work with Youghiogheny River Coal Co., Erie, Pa., controlled by the late Congressman W. L. Scott, June 2, 1884; clerk and afterwards treas. and director of the company; also treas. and director Spring Valley Coal Co., controlled by the same interests; these companies sold to Pittsburg Coal Co., when he went with them as traveling auditor and afterwards as asst. to the vice pres., leaving Pittsburg for his present position; agent The C. Reiss Coal Co., and The Milwaukee Western Fuel Co.; director The North American Steamship Co., and The Wainwright Steamship Co.; member Masonic Order, Elks, Athletic Club, and The Erie Club, and Sheboygan, Wis.,...

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Biography of Samuel Brownlee Fisher

Samuel Brownlee Fisher of Parsons, consulting engineer of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, is one of the eminent railway engineers of America. He had had nearly fifty years of active experience and had been identified with the construction of various railway lines in the West and East. He comes of an old Scotch family of Covenanter stock. On the maternal side his ancestors were the Brownlees, who were Covenanters in Scotland and were exiled because of their religious belief and settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. Fisher’s great-great-grandfather in the maternal line, George Wilie, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and another member of this same family was Colonel Thompson, an aide to General Washington. Mr. Fisher’s maternal grandfather, Samuel Brownlee, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and spent all his life on a farm in that rugged district of Southwestern Pennsylvania, dying in 1855. He was an active abolitionist in the days before the Civil war and was a member of the Associate Branch of the Presbyterian Church. Samuel Brownlee married Ann Wilie, who was born and died at Washington, Pennsylvania. The father of Mr. Fisher was Rev. Jacob P. Fisher, who was born in Ohio in 1808, but was reared and married in Washington, Pennsylvania. He was a minister of that branch of Presbyterianism formerly known as the Associate Church. He was also actively identified...

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Crow, Ethel T. – Obituary

A Celebration of Life service was held for Ethel T. Crow at the Lostine Presbyterian Church on April 12, 2005. This followed a graveside service and interment at the Lostine Cemetery, under the direction of Bollman Funeral Home. Mrs. Crow died April 8, 2005, at Wallowa Memorial Hospital in Enterprise at the age of 87. Born in Pittsburgh, Penn., on Dec. 27, 1917, she was the daughter of George and Sara (Fleishner) Theobald and the youngest of seven children. She graduated from Carrick High School in 1933, attended a business school in Pennsylvania and worked in the offices of the War Department building in Washington, D.C. There she met her future husband, Major L. Warner Crow of Lostine. They were married on Nov. 5, 1944. After the end of World War II, the newlyweds moved to Oregon, where Warner Crow joined his father, Michael, and brothers, Melvin and Victor, in running the family business – M. Crow & Co. – in Lostine, where Ethel Crow also worked. She was a member of the Lostine Presbyterian Church and maintained the church bulletin for over 50 years. She loved to spend time with her family, including time camping, fishing and attending sporting events. She was an avid bowler for many years. Mrs. Crow loved reading, writing poetry, gardening and word games, and having two poems published later in life gave her...

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Biography of Philip Wing Hathaway

Philip Wing Hathaway, a pioneer of Iowa and the Cherokee Indian Neutral Lands, was born on a farm near Wareham, Massachusetts. His early life was little unlike that of most boys of his day–spent in farm work with few school advantages, intermingled with pleasures and griefs. He stayed at home until 1832, when his father died, which parent left surviving him a wife and six children–two daughters, Adline and Sophia; four boys, Albert, Andrew, Philip and Mathias. Young Philip, tiring of the farm, sought other pursuits more in keeping with his endowed talent as a mechanic. At the age of nineteen he entered the machine shops and rolling mills at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, then followed his trade in the cities of Harrisburg and Philadelphia until soon his energies, natural and acquired abilities brought him in favor with the masters of his trade and promotions followed successively. Finally he became a partner in the ownership of one of Philadelphia’s rolling mills and machine shops which after a few years of successful operation burned down with sad disaster to its owners; and to satisfy their creditors Mr. Hathaway sacrificed his beautiful home and most of his other property, having barely money enough left from the sale to convey himself and family in 1849 to Allamakee County, Iowa, where he located a beautiful homestead twelve miles from Lansing. Here he met J. A....

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Inez Todd King of Pittsburgh PA

KING, Inez Todd9, (Chestil O.8, Ora B.7, Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) married Prof. Byron W. King, of Pittsburg, Penn., where he has a School of Oratory, Elocution and Dramatic Culture. He has been confered the degrees of A. M. and Ph. D. Mrs. King is one of the Faculty, being very successful as a dramatic reader. Children: I. Olive, m. (???) Lindsay; she is a pianist in her fathers school. II. Beatrice; gives Recital Drills and Readings. III....

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Leslie B. Todd of Pittsburgh PA

Leslie B. Todd9, (Hollis D.8, Ora B.7, Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Sept. 10, 1877, married May 23, 1906, Mittie Smith, who was born Aug. 11, 1878. He has a position in the P. O. at Pittsburg, Pa. Children: 2771. Kenneth V., b. July 7, 1907. 2771a....

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Clarence Lewis Todd of Pittsburgh PA

Clarence Lewis Todd8, (Lewis C.7, Lewis C.6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Feb. 23, 1849, in Nelson, Portage County, Ohio, died May 5, 1905, in Pittsburg, Penn., and was buried in Ashtabula, O., married Emma Wiley. Children: *2401. James G., b. June 16, 1876. 2402. Lena, b. Feb. 28, 1878. 2403. Agnes. 2404....

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Chestil Ora Todd of Chautauqua County NY

Chestil Ora Todd8, (Ora B.7, Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born July 12, 1833, in Stockton, Chautauqua County, N. Y., married about 1854, Olive Westcott, of Panama, Chautauqua County, N. Y., who died Sept., 1909, in Busti, N. Y. He was a machinist. In 1912 he was making his home with his daughter, Mrs. Inez King, in Pittsburg, Penn. Children: *2356. Eva. 2357. Demaris; who d. June 1910, in Ann Arbor, Mich. 2358. Lafayette O., m. Elpha Knapp. of Panama, N. Y. In 1912 they were living at 2 Livingston Ave., Jamestown, N. Y. He was an optician. *2359. Inez. *2360. Ernest...

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Biography of G. A. Sprecher, M. D.

G. A. Sprecher, M. D., formerly a practicing physician of Cincinnati, Ohio, and now the proprietor of the well-known “Colton Pharmacy,” which is located in the center of the city, has been a resident of Colton since 1884. The Doctor has found time to identify himself with and aid in the business and public enterprises which wrought the wonderful change in the city of Colton during the five years antedating 1889. His drug store, the Colton Pharmacy, is one of the most complete in the city, and a credit to any community, for Dr. Sprecher is a thorough master of his profession, a skillful druggist and chemist. He has been prominent in building up the city in which he has large real-estate interests. Aside from his residence and business property he owns quite a number of cottage residences. He has also 640 acres of ranch land in Riche Canon, three and a half miles southeast of Colton, and property in Perris and other places. The Doctor was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, in 1844. While a mere lad his parents moved to Ohio and settled in Clark County, where he was reared and schooled. His educational facilities were of the best, and he entered as a student in the Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio, of which his father was president. In January 1863, he cast aside his books and devoted...

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Biography of D. P. Chapman

Among the well-known and representative orange groves in the Riverside colony tract is the five acres owned by the above-named gentleman. This grove is located on the west side of Cypress Avenue, north of Bandini Avenue, about one mile south of the business center of Riverside. About four acres of his land is in oranges, seedling and Washington Navel trees twelve years of age, and other budded trees of Washington Navel, Mediterranean Sweet and St. Michael varieties, varying in age from one to six years. He has one acre in vineyard, which produced in 1888 over $200 worth of fruit. Mr. Chapman is a thorough horticulturist, and is reaping a rich reward for his labor. It is doubtful whether any finer oranges are produced in the colony than those grown upon his place. He purchased the land in 1887, since which time he has erected a substantial residence of attractive appearance, and also suitable outbuildings. He has one of the most desirable homes in his section. The subject of this sketch was born in Tolland County, Connecticut, in 1836. His parents, Simon C. and Jerusha (McKnight) Chapman, were also natives of that State. He was reared and schooled in his native place until eighteen years of age, and then went to Georgia, and was there engaged in mercantile life for the next four years, after which he resided in...

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Biography of Frank Petchner

Frank Petchner is one of Riverside’s pioneer settlers. He arrived in Riverside in December 1870 and has ever since been identified with her interests and enterprises. Mr. Petchner had spent many years in frontier life in the Territories, and had been engaged in mercantile and mining enterprises, and had made and lost fortunes; but when he located at Riverside he was without means, and dependent for the support of his family upon such labor as could be obtained. He was a blacksmith and opened a blacksmith shop on the corner of Sixth and Main streets; he also bought a block of land bounded by Sixth and Seventh and Almond and Chestnut streets; and later purchased other lots on Market Street. The first brick residence in the city was built by Mr. Petchner in 1875, on his block of land. The first year or two he worked at any labor that offered, as there was not a demand sufficient to occupy his time at his trade. He also improved his land by the planting of citrus and deciduous fruit trees. In 1874 he entered into partnership with Samuel Alder, and established a carriage-making and blacksmith shop on Main Street. This enterprise was a success, and, under the able management of these gentlemen, became one of the leading industries of the colony. Mr. Petchner was engaged in that business until 1884,...

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Biography of Alexander Owens

June 17, 1830, near Belfast, Ireland, the subject of this sketch was born. He was the son of Archibald and Mary (McMaster) Owens, both lifelong residents of the Emerald Isle. Their children were Jane, Mary, Alexander, Margaret, Anna, William and Jennie, all of whom became citizens of the United States, and all of whom, with the exception of Jennie and the subject of this review, are now deceased. Alexander came to America when but sixteen years of age and settled at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. There he earned the carpenter’s trade, which he has followed the greater part of his life. At Pittsburg, October 15, 1852, he married Miss Helen Wyman, a native of New York, born January 31, 1834. She was the daughter of Moses C. and Ann (Lamb) Wyman. A year after his marriage Mr. Owens removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he followed his trade for three years, at the end of that time becoming a resident of Rock Island, Illinois. In the Spring of 1857 he settled in the Village of Milan, then a thriving young manufacturing place, and has made this his home since, with the exception of two years spent in California. After coming to Milan Mr. Owens engaged extensively as a builder and contractor, operating in Rock Island, Mercer and Henry Counties. In 1891 he was appointed master carpenter on the western section of the...

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Biography of J. H. Moesser

J. H. Moesser, one of the early pioneers of Southern California, who was a wanderer for many years over several States of the Union, began life in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, February 21, 1835. His father, Frederick H. Moesser, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, town of Altheim, Germany, and was a dry-goods merchant, baker and butcher, at different times. He moved with his family a wife and two children-to Ohio, where he remained a few years; then he moved to Missouri and subsequently to Nauvoo, Illinois. He died at Warsaw, Illinois, in 1853. His mother, Magdalena (Gundel before marriage) Moesser, was born in Pennsylvania. Mr. Moesser, the subject of this biographical notice, left Nauvoo in July, 1846, leaving his father there, whom he never saw but once afterward. April 1, 1886, after being in the West forty years less three months, never having been east of the Rocky mountains in all that time, he re-crossed the plains to make his visit in the East. Coming West the first time, he crossed the Mississippi river: in a skiff and the State of Iowa in a wagon, arriving on the west side of Missouri river, the place was known as Winter Quarters, where he remained over winter, suffering many hardships. In June, 1847, he with others started for the great Salt Lake country, with ox teams. Fort Bridger at that time...

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