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Location: Pittsburg Pennsylvania

Ancestors of George Mitchell Hooper of Bridgewater, MA

The Hooper family, to which belonged the late George Mitchell Hooper, one of Bridgewater’s well-known citizens, is an old and distinguished one in New England. George Mitchell Hooper, son of Mitchell, was born in the town of Bridgewater Sept. 1, 1838. He received his education in the public schools and Bridgewater Academy, later attending Peirce Academy and the State normal school at Bridgewater, graduating from the latter institution in 1857. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for one year and then began the manufacture of brick with his father, a business in which he engaged for half a century. He was also a surveyor. He was identified with the banking interests of Bridgewater, having been one of the trustees of the Bridgewater Savings Bank, also filling the office of clerk. He was clerk and treasurer of the Bridgewater Cemetery Association; a member of the Plymouth County Agricultural Association, of which for years he was treasurer, and was secretary; and trustee of the Memorial Public Library. He died July 2, 1909, in his seventy-first year. On Oct. 16, 1861, Mr. Hooper was married to Mary E. Josselyn, who was born at Hanson, Mass., daughter of Hervey and Elizabeth (Howland) Josselyn. She died Jan. 30, 1884, and was buried in Mount Prospect cemetery. Eight children were born of this marriage.

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Death of Cyrus Kingsbury

Early in the year 1820, an English traveler from Liverpool, named Adam Hodgson, who had heard of the Elliot mission when at home, visited the mission, though he had to turn from his main route of travel the distance of sixty miles. He, at one time on his sixty miles route, employed a Choctaw to conduct him ten or twelve miles on his new way, which he did, then received his pay and left him to finish his journey alone. Of this Choctaw guide Mr. Hodgson, as an example of noble benevolence and faithful trust, states: “After going about...

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Narrative of Marie Le Roy and Barbara Leininger

The Narrative of Mary le Roy and Barbara Leininger. Who for four and a half years were captive among the Indians, and on the 6th May 1759 arrived happy in this city. From her own lips never written and promoted to the Press. This manuscript gives an account of the captivity and escape of these two girls, whose families lived on Penn’s Creek, in the present Union County, Pennsylvania. It also provides a lengthy list of names of other prisoners met by the two ladies in their captivity.

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The Poorman Mine

On War Eagle Mountain, a mile and a half southeast of Silver City, are a group of about twenty mines, in one of the richest belts in that section of the state, a belt which has afforded material to render Silver City famous throughout the civilized world. The Poorman mine has a production record of three million dollars, and other properties of the group as Bell Pick, Oso, Illinois Central, Jackson and Silver Cord have all been good producers. The Poorman mine was discovered in 1865, and between July 9 and October 1, 1866, there was shipped from it the enormous sum of $606,692. The ore consists of chloride, sulphide of silver and a considerable proportion of copper. At a depth of one hundred feet five hundred pounds of ruby silver were taken out in one solid piece. This piece of ore was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exposition of 1867. The Poorman mine is said to have been the richest body of ore for its size ever discovered. The mine is equipped with a ten-stamp mill, erected in 1895, and for the transportation of ore from the mine to the mill there is a wire-cable tramway of the Hallidie system one mile long. In 1888 the property was purchased by a syndicate of London, England, which is incorporated as the Poorman Gold Mines, limited. John B....

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Biographical Sketch of George Godfrey

George Godfrey lived at Ritford, England. His son Peter married Dorothea Learey, of England, by whom he had Thomas, John, Edward, George, Charles, and Mary. Thomas came to America and settled in Canada. John went to California, and died on his return to England. Edward lives in Mercer County, Pa. George married Mary Ostick, of England, and settled in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1830, in St. Louis in 1836, and in Montgomery County, where Jonesburg now stands, in 1838. His children are Mary A., George, Edward, William O., John W., Henry M., and James A. Mary A. married Rev. George Smith, a Methodist minister, who came to Montgomery County in 1836. Mr. Godfrey has been a devoted Methodist for many years, and a leading member of his church. His brother Charles settled in Louisville, Kentucky, and his son, Charles, Jr., lives in Fulton,...

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Biography of George C. Diestilhorst

George C. Diestilhorst was born in Poile, Hanover, Germany, April 18, 1813, and was there reared to manhood. He received his education in the Lutheran school, of his native place, and his father being a harness-maker by trade, on leaving school he also learned that trade and worked with his father up to the time he was twenty-three years of age, when he emigrated to America, arriving in New York City, May 1, 1836. He was successful in securing a situation in the government harness manufactory in that city, and remained six months, then went on a prospecting tour, seeking employment, to the cities of Schenectady and Buffalo, New York, Cleveland, Ohio, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reaching this latter city in May, 1837, and worked at his trade there until the following October. He was next employed on a keel-boat on the Ohio River, and went to Cincinnati, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, but was unable to secure work because of his unfamiliarity with the English language. From Louisville he went to New Albany, Indiana, where he worked three weeks at his trade, then went down the Ohio River to Smithland, at the confluence of the Cumberland and Ohio rivers and from there traveled overland on foot, with occasional rides in farm wagons, to Princeton, Kentucky, arriving in December, 1837, and secured employment until the spring of 1838. Next he went...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank O’Neill

The sturdy pioneer, capable gentleman and patriotic citizen whose, name heads this article is one of the leading agriculturists and stockmen of his section of Malheur County, being a man who has wrought with great energy and commendable wisdom in his efforts to assist in the up building and advancement of this section of the country. Our subject was born in the County of Antrim, Ulster province, Ireland, on May 10, 1846, being the son of John and Elizabeth O’Neill. He was reared on a farm and remained in his native place until 1866, when he went to Scotland, and four years later was in Liverpool, whence on September 23, 1870, he embarked on the “Harvest Queen.” a sailing vessel bound for the United States. After a very rough trip of thirty-eight days he landed in New York, thence to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and one year later went to San Francisco. In Sonoma County, at Visalia, and in Mendocino County, in that state, he labored in the lumber business. In San Francisco, on December 18, 1875, Mr. O’Neill married Mary Mullary, and in 1881 they came to Portland. “thence they journeyed by team to lower Willow creek in Malheur County and located a quarter section, taking up the stock business. Three children were horn to this marriage, Mrs. Annie Zahlor, Mrs. Mary Loran and Francis P. In 1882, very soon...

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Slave Narrative of Samuel Simeon Andrews

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Samuel Simeon Andrews Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 86 For almost 30 years Edward Waters College, an African Methodist Episcopal School, located on the north side of Kings Road in the western section of Jacksonville, has employed as watchman, Samuel Simeon Andrews (affectionately called “Parson”), a former slave of A.J. Lane of Georgia, Lewis Ripley of Beaufort, South Carolina, Ed Tillman of Dallas, Texas, and John Troy of Union Springs, Alabama. “Parson” was born November 18, 1850 in Macon, Georgia, at a place called Tatum Square, where slaves were held, housed and sold. “Speculators” (persons who traveled from place to place with slaves for sale) had housed 84 slaves there – many of whom were pregnant women. Besides “Parson,” two other slave-children, Ed Jones who now lives in Sparta, Georgia, and George Bailey were born in Tatum Square that night. The morning after their births, a woman was sent from the nearby A.J. Lane plantation to take care of the three mothers; this nurse proved to be “Parson’s” grandmother. His mother told him afterwards that the meeting of mother and daughter was very jubilant, but silent and pathetic, because neither could with safety show her pleasure in finding the other. At the auction which was held a few days later, his mother, Rachel, and her two sons, Solomon Augustus and her infant who was...

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Biography of James King

A leading representative of the building interests, of Boise, and the present register of the land office of this city, James King is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Pittsburg, on the 15th of August 1832. He is of both German and English descent, his ancestors of those nationalities having settled in New York in 1664. They came with General Braddock and always remained in this land. In the war of the Revolution the family was represented by loyal Americans, who fought for liberty, and throughout many years they were prominently identified with the Presbyterian Church. The grandfather of our subject was the first of the name to locate in Pennsylvania. He was an industrious farmer and reached the commonly allotted age of three-score years and ten. His son, Jacob King, the father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, July 25, 1799, and married Miss Mary Covert, who represented an English family equally ancient and honorable. Among her ancestors were likewise found those who aided in throwing off the yoke of British tyranny. Jacob King departed this life in 1883, at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife, who was born in 1804, died in 1878, at the age of seventy-four years. James King is the second in their family of six children. He was educated in his native city of Pittsburg and is...

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Biographical Sketch of George N. Ifft

George N. Ifft, of the firm of Ifft & Wallin, proprietors and managers of the Pocatello Tribune, is a native of Butler County, Pennsylvania, born January 27, 1865. He began newspaper work, as a reporter, in Pittsburg, that state, and continued in that capacity and in various editorial relations in other cities, as Washington, D. C, Chicago, Denver, Salt Lake City and San Francisco, until January 1, 1893, when he came to Idaho, locating at Pocatello, and since that time he has been connected with the Pocatello Tribune, as more fully described in our sketch of that paper. Mr. Ifft is a Republican, but is one of those who have always been firm believers in silver as advocated by the people of the west generally, and as such has taken an active part in the politics of the state. William Wallin is a practical, all around newspaper man, who came to Idaho in 1893, after a service extending over a number of years in various capacities on papers in Ogden and Salt Lake...

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Biography of Otho Eckersley

OTHO ECKERSLEY. – Among the successful and enterprising agriculturists of Union county there must not be failure to mention the esteemed pioneer whose name is at the head of this article, and who has demonstrated his substantial qualities in this county, gaining here a success that is both gratifying and commendable, while he has also exemplified the virtues of good citizenship and the qualities of a true and upright man. Many of our most thrifty and leading population came from the land with which we are most intimately connected, England, and there was born the subject of this sketch on September 23, 1839, being the son of John and Martha (Thorpe) Eckersley. In Lancashire the family remained until 1848, when the father came to the United States, settling in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and there the remainder of the family joined him in 1853. In 1856 they went to Iowa and the father bought one-half section of land, remaining there for two years, then he returned to Pittsburg, where in 1863, he was called from the scenes of earth. The mother died in 1857. In 1860 our subject went to Colorado, engaging in mining near Leadville, California Gulch and other points and then returned to Iowa, where he remained for a time and then fitted out teams and crossed the plains to eastern Oregon, taking up packing and teaming to the...

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Biography of George Gumbert

The proprietor of the city meat market and the pioneer butcher of Boise, where he has been in business since 1864, is George Gumbert, who is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having taken place in Pittsburg on June 11, 1835. Of German extraction, his ancestors were early settlers of Pennsylvania and his great grandfather, Gumbert, fought in the colonial army during the Revolutionary war. His paternal grandfather was a farmer in Westmoreland County. His father, George Gumbert, was born in Pittsburg, where he followed the meat business nearly all his life, having attained the advanced age of ninety years. He was in politics first a Whig, later joining the Republican Party upon its organization. He married Miss Amelia Turner, who was born in Pennsylvania, and both of them were members of the Baptist church. They became the parents of nine children, of whom three sons and a daughter are now living. George Gumbert, the immediate subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of Pittsburg and in 1850, when but fifteen years old, he crossed the plains to California, later removing to Nevada and engaging in the butcher business at Virginia City. He volunteered in the war against the Piutes, furnishing his own horse and complete outfit, and assisted in driving the Indians back to the reservation. In 1863 he came to Boise, which at that...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Criswell Arbuthnot

Arbuthnot, Charles Criswell; professor of Economics, W. R. U.; born, Pittsburg, Pa., May 30, 1876; son of James M. and Rebecca M. Criswell Arbuthnot; B. S., Geneva College, 1899; asst. in History, 1899-1900; Fellow in Political Economy, Univ. of Chicago, 1901-03; Ph. D., 1903; Instructor in Political Economy, Univ. of Nebraska, 1903-04; Adjunct Professor, 1904; Instructor in Economics, Adelbert College, and the College for Women, W. R. U., 1904-08; associate professor of Economics, 1906-08; professor of Economics, 1908-; member American Economic Ass’n, American Academy of Political and Social Science; Haymarket District Committee of Associated Charities; Board of Management of University Branch, Y. M. C. A.; member Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, chr. Sub-Committee on Smoke Prevention; The Civic League of Cleveland and Men’s League for Women’s Suffrage; member The City Club; contributor to journals on economical topics; interested in vocational guidance plans for the Y. M. C....

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Biographical Sketch of William McKinley Duncan

Duncan, William McKinley; lawyer; born, Pittsburg, Pa., May 19, 1873; son of Andrew J. and Sarah McKinley Duncan; educated, public schools Pittsburgh, Pa., and Rayen High School, Youngstown, O., and Cornell University, Ithaca., N. Y.; married, Youngstown, O., Oct. 18, 1899, Viola Deetrick; issue, three sons; admitted to bar, October, 1894; associated with Squire, Sanders & Dempsey ever since; became member of firm, January, 1911; representing Eastern Trunk Railroad in the engineer arbitration; receiver of the Wheeling & Lake Erie R. R. Co.; member Union, Athletic, Mayfield and Hermit...

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Biographical Sketch of Aaron Kerr Hannen

Hannen, Aaron Kerr; life insurance; born, Pittsburg, Pa., 1854; son of Henry and Amanda Kerr Hannen; educated, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa.; married, Pittsburg, Pa., 1882, Annie Piper DeArent, Hollidaysburg, Pa.; issue, one son, Harry A. Hannen, of Los Angeles, Cal.; thirty years with Berkshire Life Insurance Co. of Pittsfield, Mass.; member all Masonic bodies of Western Pennsylvania, and Colonial...

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