Location: Pike County MO

Biographical Sketch of Cornelius Mabrey

Cornelius Mabrey, of Pittsylvania Co., Va., was a. mill-wright by trade. He was married twice, but of his first wife and her children we have no account. His second wife was Polly Chaney, by whom he had Patsey, Pleasant, Letitia, Elizabeth, Polly, and Philip. Mr. Mabrey moved to middle Tennessee and lived there several years. He afterward settled in Logan County, Ky., where, after a residence of several years, he was drowned. In 1828 his widow and her children came to Missouri, and settled in Lincoln County, where she died two years after-ward. The eldest daughter, Patsey, married George Huss, who also settled in Lincoln County. Pleasant married Barsheba England, and is now living in Pike County. He had seven children, five of whom live in Montgomery County. Letitia married James Eidrum, of Kentucky. Elizabeth married Shelton Cobert. Polly married Elbert Enert. The three latter all live in Lincoln County. Philip, who lives in Montgomery County, was married twice; first to Polly Uptegrove, and second to Eliza J. Hughes. He is a carpenter by trade, and has done well in his battle with life. In his younger days he was very intimate with Dr. McFarland, of Troy, and they went to all the quiltings and dances together. They were both very tall men, and the lofts of the cabins had to be taken out before they could dance without...

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Biographical Sketch of John Oden

John Oden, of England settled in Loudon County, Virginia. His children were Hezekiah, Thomas, John, Lewis, William, and Vinson. Hezekiah married Elizabeth Leach, of Virginia, and settled in Pike County, Mo., in 1828. They had John, William, Vinson, Harriet, Maria, Polly, Sally, and Alfred. Vinson married Mary House, and lives in Montgomery County. William and Polly died in Kentucky. Sally was married first to Joseph Thomas, and second to Garland T. Hudson. She is a widow again, and lives in Audrain County. Maria and Alfred married and remained in Pike County. Harriet married John King, who moved to New Orleans,...

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Biographical Sketch of Miles Price

Miles Price, of Wales, settled in Lincoln County, N. C., prior to the revolutionary war. He married a Miss Sharp, and had a son named Thomas, who was a soldier of the revolution. He married Isabella Sharp, and they had Elizabeth, Thomas, jr., Reese, Isaac, James, John, Isabella, and Ellen Zohn married Anna Barber, of North Carolina, and they had four children previous to their removal to Missouri, viz.: Elizabeth L., Cynthia, Miles S., and Thomas J. They came to Missouri and settled in Pike County in 1819, after which they had the following children Robert B., John H., Sallie A., Emily I., and Lucinda J. All of his children except Miles S., who is a member of the County Court of Montgomery County, settled in Lincoln County. Mr. Price was Constable and Justice of the Peace in Pike County for thirty years. He was also a great snake killer, and every spring he and his neighbors would have a snake hunt. One spring they killed 9,000 rattlesnakes. Isaac Price first settled in St. Charles County, and afterward in Lincoln. He married Tabitha Wilkerson, of the former...

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Biographical Sketch of Caleb Summers

Caleb Summers was raised in Montgomery County, Maryland, where he married Rachel Crawford. In 1796 he settled in Jefferson County, Kentucky. His children were Polly, Benjamin, Robert, Thomas, and. Malinda. Robert married his cousin, Grace Summers, and settled in Pike County, Missouri, in 1834. His children were William B., Elizabeth, Caleb L., Noah, Benjamin F., George, Robert A., and Thomas. William B. married the widow Tucker, whose maiden name was Margaret J. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Caleb L. married Sallie A. Bryan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1840. Benjamin F. married Antoinette Sharp, and settled in Montgomery County in 1842. Noah married and settled in Montgomery the same year. Benjamin, son of Caleb Summers, Sr., married: Polly Raferty, and settled in Montgomery County in 1839. The father of Caleb Summers. Sr. came to America in 1750, and the boots he wore then are in the museum at...

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Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to...

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Biographical Sketch of Solomon Fisher

Solomon Fisher, of Virginia, married Mary A. Petty, by whom he had-Adam, George, William, John, Solomon, Jr., Eunice, Maxmillian, Parthena, Selemer, and Emmarilla. All of the family came on a keel-boat to Louisiana, Missouri. Adam married Dulcinea Powers, of Virginia, and settled in Pike County, in 1824. They had Mary A., Sally, William P., and Joseph. William P. married and lives in Montgomery County. George Fisher died in California, and Solomon died in the United States army. Mr. Adam Fisher laid off the town of Frankford, in Pike...

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Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Ingram

Jonathan Ingram married Barbara Mennefee, of Virginia, and settled in Logan Co., Ky. Their children were Rhoda, Jonas, Samuel, Garrett, James, Anna, Polly, and Barsheba. Garrett married Nancy Hudson, and settled in Pike Co., Mo., in 1818. Their children were Polly, John, Barbara, Elizabeth, Jonathan, Samuel, Nancy, and Sally. Rhoda Ingram settled in Indiana, and James and Polly in...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hudson

John Hudson and his wife, who was a Miss Allen, lived in North Carolina. They had six sons Isaac, Drury, Thomas, William, John, and Jesse. Drury and Isaac were in the revolutionary war. The latter settled in Georgia, where he married Polly Shipper. He afterward removed to South Carolina, and from thence, to Kentucky, and in 1818 he came to Missouri. The names of his children were Elizabeth, Nancy, Sally, John, Thomas, William, and Charles. Elizabeth married Lemuel Cox. Nancy married Garrett Ingram. Sally married James Owings. John was married three times; first to Lucinda Morris, of Kentucky; second to Nancy Holloway, and third to a widow lady named Carolina W. King. Thomas married Polly Hammond, and settled in Pike County. Charles and William married sisters, and settled in Lincoln County. William’s first wife died, and he afterward married Sarah...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hickerson

John Hickerson, of Fauquier Co., Va., married Elizabeth Baker, and their son, Thomas, came to Missouri in 1816, as teamster for John Ferguson, who settled in Darst’s Bot-tom. In 1818 Hickerson moved to Montgomery County and settled on the west bank of Loutre creek, near Loutre Lick. He soon after married Susan VanBibber, daughter of Major Isaac VanBibber, by whom he had thirteen children Melissa, Thomas A., James, Isaac V., Robert L., Alfouzo, and Susan J. The other six children died in infancy. Ezekiel Heckerson, a brother of Thomas, married Elizabeth Hayden, of Kentucky, and settled in Pike Co., Mo., in 1823, and in 1827 he removed to Illinois. His children were Etihue W., William B., Nancy A., James, Samuel, Silas L., Joseph L., and Mary A. Silas L. married Jane Allen, of Callaway County, and now lives in Mexico,...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse Henton

Jesse Henton of Logan Co., Ky., was in the war of 181.2. He married Sarah Hughes, of Kentucky, and settled in Pike Co., Mo., in 1827, His children were John, James L., William, David, Wesley S., Rolla W., Mary J., Benjamin, Sarah A., Elizabeth E., and Harriet D. Rolla W. married Elizabeth L. Jamison, of Pike County, and settled in Montgomery. Samuel, son of John Henton, settled in Pike County in 1826. He married Mary Estens, and subsequently settled in Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Lewellyn

Jacob Lewellyn, son of Samuel Lewellyn, had a son Samuel who settled in Pike Co., Mo., at a very early date, and died in 1837. He left a son, John W., who married Jane Trabue, of Kentucky, in 1824, and had ten children, nine of whom are still living. Mr. Lewellyn lived for some time in Clarke Co., Mo., where he was Judge of the County Court for eight years. He settled in Montgomery County in 1839, having lived in St. Charles County in 1818, and in Pike County in...

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Biographical Sketch of John W. Biggs

It is perfectly natural to admire pluck and ambition in a young man and this no doubt is one reason why he whose name heads this sketch has won so many friends duringĀ  silence in Oregon. He is of flint class who are opposed to leading the routine life of all unambitious citizens, but with the energy and enterprise characteristic of Young America when untrammeled with restraint, he seeks higher and nobler spheres of life, and looks forward to securing fame and fortune before being overtaken by old age. Mr. Biggs was born in Georgetown, Kentucky, in 1870, but moved to Pike County, Missouri, at an early ago, with his parents. While living there he began reading law partly in Iron. Champ Clark’s office at, Bowling Green, Missouri. In January 1893, he came to Burns and taught school there the balance of that year. Moving to Canyon City, he taught there during the 1894 term. In October of that year he was admitted to the bar, and returning to Burns, began practicing with signal success. In 1897, in connection with Thomas Jones, he established the private bank of Jones & Biggs. They do a general brokerage business, receiving deposits, selling exchange, making collections, fit. He is married to Miss Mabel Hazeltine, of Canyon...

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Biography of Col. James Montgomery

Col. James Montgomery, one of the free-state leaders in Kansas and an officer in the Civil war, was a native of Ashtabula County, where he was born in 1814, and was a cousin of the hero of Quebec. In 1837 he went to Kentucky, where he taught school. He moved to Pike County, Missouri, with his family, in 1852, and a year later located in Jackson County in order to be ready to enter Kansas as soon as the territory was organized and the lands opened to settlement. Some of his friends, among whom was Doctor Thornton, knowing him to be opposed to slavery, persuaded him to go to Bates County, Mo., by telling him that he could obtain as good land there as he could in Kansas. He accepted their advice, but quickly became dissatisfied and, returning to Kansas in 1854, purchased a claim from a proslavery settler about five miles from the present town of Mound City. It was not long until he was recognized as a leader by the free-state men of that locality. In 1857 he organized and commanded the “Self-Protective Company,” which had been formed to defend the rights of the anti-slavery settlers, and backed by this company Montgomery ordered some of the most rabid pro-slavery citizens to leave the territory. After their departure, he settled down to improve his claim, but later in...

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Biography of Rev. P. H. Bradley

Rev. P. H. Bradley, pastor of the Blessed Sacrament Catholic church at 2700 North Kings Highway in St. Louis, was born January 2, 1563, in the city which is still his home, his parents being John and Mary (Delaney) Bradley, the former a native of Ireland, while the latter was born in Philadelphia, her parents, however, having come to this country from the Emerald isle, crossing the Atlantic on the same vessel that brought Stephen Girard to the new world. John Bradley arrived in the United States in his youthful days, becoming a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was subsequently married. About 1862 he removed westward to St. Louis, where he engaged in dealing in horses and mules for many years. Rev. Mr. Bradley was educated in the old St. Louis University, where he pursued his classical studies, and later took up the study of philosophy and theology in St. Vincent’s Seminary at Cape Girardeau, Missouri. He was there ordained to the priesthood in 1895, Archbishop Kane officiating. Following his ordination he became assistant at the old Immaculate Conception church at Jefferson and Lucas Place, now the site of an oil station. He served there for two years and was then appointed assistant to the Sacred Heart church, with which he was connected for five years. In 1902 he was appointed pastor of St. Joseph’s church at Louisiana,...

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Biography of Hon. David Patterson Dyer

Hon. David Patterson Dyer, for many years an influential leader of the republican party in Missouri, filling various public offices of importance, has at the same time continued an active representative of the bench and bar of the state and it was not until May, 1919, that he retired from the office of United States district judge for the eastern district of Missouri, being at the time in the eighty-first year of his age. He was born February 12, 1838, in Henry county, Virginia, a son of David Dalton and Nancy (Salmon) Dyer. The father was born in Henry county, Virginia, in 1791 and the mother’s birth occurred in 1794. As far back as the ancestry can be traced, his forefathers lived in the Old Dominion, locating there in early colonial days. David Dalton Dyer was a soldier of the War of 1812 and for twelve years thereafter was a member of the house and senate of the Virginia legislature, leaving the impress of his individuality and ability upon the laws enacted during that period. David Patterson Dyer was educated in the common schools of Lincoln county, Missouri, having been brought to this state during his early childhood. He also spent a year as a student in St. Charles College. Later he took up the study of law and in due course of time was admitted to the bar....

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