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Location: Pike County IL

Biography of Mrs. Dr. Mary C. E. Kellogg

MRS. DR. MARY C.E. KELLOGG.- Mrs. Mary C. Edwards Morand, who became the wife of Doctor George Kellogg in 1879, and is now continuing the work and manufacturing the remedies of her husband, was born in Illinois, and received her education in Pittsfield, and at the Jacksonville Seminary, of which Doctor Jaques was president. In early life she was much of an invalid, and for her own improvement read medicine, looking closely into the systems of allopathy and hydropathy, and taking also a course under the celebrated phrenologist, Professor O.S. Fowler, of New York, and afterwards studying with Doctor P.W. Shastid, of Pittsfield, Illinois. At the age of seventeen she was married to W.C. Morand, M.D. Of the two sons born of this union, one is Doctor W.E. Morand, now a physician in Portland; and the other is Elmer E. Morand, a farmer at Silver Creek, Washington. Coming to Oregon for her health in 1874, she was married five years later to Doctor George Kellogg, through whom she had received essential aid for consumption, from which she was suffering. She began at once the study of his system, and soon mastered the art of making his remedies. These medicines have gained a wide reputation on this coast, and are even in considerable demand in the Eastern states. The well-known home remedies, Balsam of Life, Family Liniment, Compound Cathartic Bitters,...

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Biography of Allen C. Mason

ALLEN C. MASON. – The well-known fact that a city presents, as a whole, the characteristics of the individuals who compose it, finds no better illustration than in the city of Tacoma, Washington. It is wide-awake, enterprising and progressive, and is such not only because of its unrivaled location and its commanding position as the terminus of the great Northern Pacific Railroad, but because its business men are themselves possessed of a spirit of progressive enterprise, are thoroughly imbued with confidence in the great destiny of their city, and are united in their efforts to promote its welfare. Prominent among these public-spirited men, standing at the very front of progress, is Allen C. Mason, to whom Tacoma is largely indebted for its widespread reputation, and for the moneyed interest so many people have taken in it. Since he settled in Tacoma, Mr. Mason has done more to advance its interests than any citizen within its limits. He has had the handling of more real estate, has caused the investment of more money, has more extensively advertised its advantages, and has induced more people to cast their lot in the Terminal city, than any other of its enterprising citizens, of whom there are many. He has seen the city grow, from a few board shanties scattered among the trees and stumps, to its present grand array of brick and stone...

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Biography of Isaac S. Lightle

Isaac S. Lightle. The influence of a sound, conservative banking house is wide and its practical results far reaching. Without such an institution in its midst, no city can hope to take its place among its sister communities, and to it will come no reliable outside concerns. It may be truly said that the growth and development of a community depends largely upon the quality and stability of its banks, and this means the sagacity and integrity of the men who stand at their head. Therefore the thriving community of Arcadia, in Crawford County, is fortunate in the possession of such a stable institution as the Arcadia Home State Bank, at the head of which, in the office of president, is Isaac S. Lightle. Mr. Lightle has had a long and interesting career, which has included participation in the battles of war and peace, and which has invaded various fields of endeavor. He has been successful in the numerous enterprises with which he has been connected, and is representative of the type of men who lend strength to banking institutions because of their personal worth and ability. Mr. Lightle is of Irish extraction on the paternal side of the family, and of German descent on his mother’s side. He was born at Griggsville, Pike County, Illinois, December 9, 1840, a son of James and Maria (Julian) Lightle. The family...

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Biographical Sketch of Beamer, P.W.

P. W. Beamer, general blacksmith, wagon and plow maker, was born March 12, 1846, in Jackson, Ohio; was raised in Adams and Pike counties, Ill.; served apprenticeship at the above trade in 1858-1859 to fall of 1860. Enlisted in the spring of 1861 in Company K, Sixteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and participated in all the battles of his command, which was under Generals Pope, Rosecranz and Grant. Re-enlisted as a veteran in December, 1863, and participated in the campaigns under Sherman until the war closed; was discharged as First Sergeant at Springfield, Ill, July 1865. Was married to Miss E. A. Keller, of Quincy, Ill., and has three children, viz., George W. A., Aaron, E. F., and Julia. Went to Colorado in the spring of 1869, and engaged in mining for several years; then worked at his trade. Returned to Illinois, and was engaged in plow making until the fall of 1878. Came to Kansas, engaged in agricultural and stock pursuits; and came to Dodge in 1879, and worked at his trade until September, 1882, when he engaged in business as above. Is a member of the Masonic fraternity as high as Knights Templar, also as a P. G. in the I. O. O. F. and Past Chancellor of the order of Knights of Pythias, and a member of the order of Good Templars and E. A. Union...

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