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Location: Pickaway County OH

Biography of I. W. Burgett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now I. W. Burgett, deceased, was, during his residence in Douglas County, one of its leading and most successful farmers. From the time he was ten years old he spent the whole of his eventful life in Sargent Township. He is a descendant of English and German ancestors, who were among the early residents of Ohio. His grandfather was in the war of 1812. His father, Abraham Burgett, lived in Pickaway County and there married Eliza Wells, a native of Ohio. He and his wife continued to live in that County, and there Isaac W. Burgett was born. The family shortly afterward removed to Indiana and settled in Vermillion County, near Perrysville, on the Wabash River. Here Abraham Burgett followed the occupations of cooper and farmer. He died in 1840, leaving five children. Isaac W. Burgett was born June 18, 1829. When the family removed to Douglas County they settled near the mouth of Brushy Fork. He went to school in the Sargent neighborhood and in the vicinity of Newman. On coming to Douglas County his mother rented land, and when a mere boy he had charge of the farm and with a younger brother performed nearly all the labor. This continued until his mother’s second marriage. In the summer he worked at home and in the...

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Biography of Capt. John Halstead

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This gentleman is regarded as one of the most influential and worthy citizens of Howell County, and it is a pleasure to here chronicle the events that mark his life as one of usefulness. Capt. John Halstead, whose name was originally spelled with two L’s, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, October8, 1841. In tracing back the genealogy of this family we find that it originated in England, and that the first immigrants to this country settled on Manhattan Island, where they were among the pioneers. Alabartis Halstead, father of our subject, was born in the Empire State in 1808. His father, Abraham Halstead, was a native of New York State, born at Harlem June 12, 1783. The latter married Miss Magdaline Scribner, and these children were born to them: Alabartis, John, Isaac, Catherine and Hallstead. Abraham Halstead was a son of John and Sarah (Myer) Halstead. This worthy couple reared these children: Abraham, John, Isaac, James Sarah, Elliott and Catherine. John Halstead was a son of Thomas Halstead, who was born in 1825. The latter married Phoebe Bogardus and passed his entire life in the Empire State, dying there in 1808. He reared these children: John, Edward, Elizabeth, Jacob, Margarite, Isaac, Jonas and Phcebe A. The Halstead family lived in New York State until the...

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Biography of Alexander Mahaffie

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Alexander Mahaffie. An honored survivor of the great Civil War and a substantial retired farmer of Harwood Township is found in Alexander Mahaffie, who was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1835. For many years Mr. Mahaffie has been a respected and esteemed resident of Champaign County and he has been identified with many of the things which have been beneficial to this section. The parents of Alexander Mahaffie were William and Elizabeth Mahaffie, who moved from Ohio to Indiana when he was eighteen months old. There he grew to manhood and obtained a district school education. When the Civil War came on he demonstrated the sincerity of his patriotism by enlisting, at Loganstown, Indiana, and was mustered in at Laporte as a member of Company F, One Hundred Fifty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which regiment soon marched southward and took station at Nashville, Tennessee. During the time the regiment remained at Nashville Mr. Mahaffie, with many other soldiers, contracted measles, and as it prevailed in a malignant form in his case he was sent to the hospital at Nashville for treatment, but when able to return home was found incapacitated for further military service. When he enlisted he was a robust young man weighing 145 pounds, but when returned to his people he was almost a...

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Biography of Hon. Thomas J. Roth

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. Thomas J. Roth. Since 1906 the legal profession of Champaign County has been capably and honorably represented at Urbana by Hon. Thomas J. Roth, former judge of the County Court and a legist of the county for forty-three years. For the greater part of this period Judge Roth was located at Rantoul, but came to Urbana to assume the duties of his judicial office, and upon the expiration of his term remained at the county seat in the enjoyment of a constantly increasing practice. Hon. Thomas J. Roth was born at Circleville, Pickaway County, Ohio, December 3, 1846. and is a son of Thomas B. and Esther (Ghrist) Roth. His paternal grandfather was a native of Holland who immigrated to the United States as a young man and located with his wife in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Thomas B. Roth, however, was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. Mr. Roth’s mother’s maternal grandfather, Charles R. Morris, was born in Maryland and his wife in New Jersey, and Mr. Roth’s maternal grandparents, Jonathan and Mary (Morris) Ghrist, were both natives of Maryland, from which it will be seen that on the maternal side Mr. Roth’s ancestry is distinctively American for several generations. As a young man Thomas B. Roth removed to Pickaway County, Ohio, where he lived for a...

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Biography of Charles B. Wiggins

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles B. Wiggins. So indispensable has the automobile become to modern life that one is led to marvel that such great progress in manufacture and use could have been made in comparatively so short a time. Although the idea of self-propelled vehicles was entertained and to some extent proved possible long before 1886, when the first horseless carriage as a practical conveyance appeared on the boulevards of Paris, France, it presented so many impossible features that for years the venture was not regarded as feasible. When other motive power than steam became known to the industries, it required only the application of inventive minds to evolve the automobile, a rather crude affair even in the summer of 1898, when in the entire United States there were only eighty of these new vehicles. In comparison with the present the record is astounding, not only in the volume of automobile output, but in the improvements that each year adds to the utility, beauty, use and comfort of this wonderful invention. With the increased use of the automobile dawned a new prosperity in every land, business methods have been revolutionized, agriculture is carried on along new lines, social life has been pleasantly stimulated and even war is prosecuted with unheard of vigor because of automobile inventions. Thousands of far-seeing...

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Biography of Jessie K. Clarke, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In no field of endeavor requiring intellectuality has woman failed to demonstrate her equality with man, and more and more the different lines of professional labor are opening to her, and therein she is winning successes that are most creditable. Dr. Jessie K. Clarke, although a recent acquisition to the medical fraternity of Grangeville, has already demonstrated her right to be classed among the foremost physicians of Idaho County, and her ability is indicated by the liberal patronage she now enjoys. She makes a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and her labors have been attended by most gratifying results to patient and practitioner. Dr. Clarke is a native of Ohio, her birth having occurred in Circleville, June 1, 1861. She is of English lineage on the paternal side and of Scotch descent on the maternal, her mother’s people tracing their ancestry back to Sir William Wallace, one of the greatest heroes and patriots that his land has ever produced. The Clarkes have for generations been residents of New York. To this family belongs Dr. Elisha Clarke, a grand-uncle of the lady of whom we write. Her father, William A. Clarke, was a native of Albany, New York, was a farmer by occupation, and religiously was connected with the United Brethren church....

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Biography of William Ross Phillips

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William Ross Phillips. During a residence in Shawnee County of more than forty-five years, William Ross Phillips had proved himself one of the ablest and most resourceful farmers in the Kaw Valley. Hard work and a sober industrious life have had their rewards in this case. There is an interesting evidence of his prosperity in the shape of tax receipts. His first tax receipt in Kansas was for five dollars. In 1915 he paid in taxes on his lands $236. His farm comprises fifty acres in the home place, and 160 acres in Menoken Township, of rich bottom lands in the Kaw Valley, and its superficial appearance and improvements furnish ample evidence of the success he had won in this field. Mr. Phillips had always been a thorough believer in the principle of feeding the crop and not hauling it to market. He was born in 1846 in Guernsey County, Ohio. His father William Ross Phillips Sr. was born in Wales in 1793, came to this country when a young man, and from Guernsey County Ohio, moved to Pickaway County in 1851. He afterwards came to Kansas, and died at the advanced age of eighty-four, in 1877 at his home at 1025 Jackson Street, Topeka. He was laid to rest in Topeka Cemetery. In 1827 the...

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Biography of Joel M. Walker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In all the walks of life Captain Joel M. Walker has so acquitted himself as to be regarded as a most valued and honorable citizen, and as a representative business man and a leader ni political circles he well deserves mention among the prominent residents of Idaho. Through the civil war he loyally served his country upon the field of battle, and has ever discharged his duties of citizenship with marked promptness and fidelity. It is pleasing indulgence to write the biography of a man who has been so prominent in the civil and military affairs of the nation as has Captain Walker. This country has brought forth many heroes, statesmen, financiers and brilliant men in all spheres of life. Its annals teem with the records of good lives and noble deeds. Most of our noblest and best men are “selfmade,” and a worthy representative of that class is the subject of this review, who deserves prominent mention in this volume by reason of his broad sympathies and public spirit. He has left the imprint of his individuality on each place in which, for any length of time, he ever resided, and Kendrick owes much of its advancement to his efforts. His patriotism is clearly shown by his quick response to the call to arms, when...

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Biography of George H. Hunter

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George H. Hunter, a resident of Wellington almost forty years, is one of the leading millers of the state, is president of the oldest bank in Wellington, and has also given much of his time and energies to public affairs, being the present mayor of Wellington. He was born on a farm near Circleville, Ohio, December 1, 1849, one of the five children of Alexander M. and Sophia (Zepp) Hunter, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. Sophia Zepp was of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction, and when a child was brought to Ohio by her uncle and aunt. Alexander M. Hunter enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil war, but on account of physical disability was not accepted for service. He was a republican and a member of the Congregational Church. He came out to Wellington, was associated with his son in the flour mill from 1879 until 1910, and one day while fishing on a railway bridge was killed by a train, being then nearly ninety years of age. When George H. Hunter was six months of age his parents moved to a farm in Shelby County, Illinois. He had only the advantages of the district schools and his higher education was gained largely through his own efforts and by paying his...

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Biography of Hon. Horace S. Clark

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. Horace S. Clark, attorney at law, Mattoon; was born in Huntsburg, Geauga Co., Ohio, Aug. 12, 1840; his father emigrated to Ohio from Vermont at an early day; at the age of 15 years, with a fair education, he left the old homestead and came West to Chicago, where he sought employment and labored a short time; he soon left the city and going to Kane Co., engaged in farm work during the summer and attended school during the winter season, paying his way by manual labor before and after school-hours; in the spring of 1856, he reached Iowa City, and made his home with an older brother while pursuing a student life in Iowa State University; here he soon became a leader among his fellow-students as an orator and debater; during vacations, he engaged in teaching school, and in the law office of Justice William E. Miller; read with attention and profit the works of Blackstone and various other treatises on law during the first year of his residence in Iowa City; he returned to Kane Co., purchased ten cows, shipped them by rail to the city, and from the proceeds of the milk, pailed by his own hands, defrayed his current expenses; in the spring of 1858, with a capital of $200, he...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas H. Crispin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Thomas H. Crispin, farmer; P. O. Rardin; born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, May 5, 1833, where he attended school and assisted his father in the mason trade until 14 years of age, when he went to Bellefontaine, Logan Co., where he learned and worked at the trade of mason and plasterer until 1852, when he emigrated to Carlinville, Ill., and followed his trade for six years; he located in Coles Co. in the spring of 1859, on Sec. 30, Morgan Tp., where he engaged in farming one year, then six years upon Sec 9; he located upon his present place in 1864, where he has since continued to live, and where he owns 110 acres of prairie and timber land. His marriage with Susannah J. Painter was celebrated in 1852; she was born in Macoupin Co., Ill., Nov. 15, 1833; they have seven children now living, having lost one by death; the names of the living are Nancy C., born Jan. 19, 1853; Isabel J., born July 27, 1854; Jacob J., May 2, 1856; Thomas J., Feb. 16, 1858; William Dec. 15, 1860; Geo. B. McClellan, Oct. 1, 1863; Mary H., Dec. 16, 1868; Jesse, March 21, 1875; the deceased is Alonzo G-., born Sept. 10, 1866, died April 19, 1868; Mrs. Crispin died Aug. 18,...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Furness

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Thomas Furness, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Fuller’s Point; one of the early settlers; was born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Feb. 17. 1825; came to this State and settled in Coles Co. in 1856, and with the exception of five years’ residence in Moultrie Co., his home has been in Coles Co.; his farm, which is located in both counties, consists of 240 acres, valued at $7,200. He was married Dec. 25, 1848, to Miss Mary Kepler, who was born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Feb. 9, 1829; they have ten children, seven of whom are living, viz., Louisa, Francis and Johnny, deceased; Theodore, James, Cornelia, Willie, Laura, Georgie, and...

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Biography of A. D. S. Alkire

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A. D. S. Alkire is the well-known and popular City Clerk and Assessor of Riverside, a position he ably fills with credit to himself and honor to that enterprising city. Mr. Alkire is a native of Pickaway County, Ohio, born at Mount Sterling in 1837. His father, William A. Alkire, was a native of Kentucky and a descendant of an old colonial family of Virginia. He was a carpenter by trade, but was engaged also in farming. Mr. Alkire’s mother, Hannah (Osborne) Alkire, was a native of Ohio, and died when the subject of this sketch was but four years old. He was reared in his native place, and his lot from early childhood was one of labor. At the age of eleven he really commenced life on his own account and depended upon his own exertions for support and schooling. It was a rough school for a boy, but he developed those manly traits of his character which have in after years secured his success in business pursuits and enabled him to wage the battle of life, gaining victories where his more favored competitors suffered defeat. Mr. Alkire’s first essay in supporting himself was in learning the shoemaker’s trade. A hard master forced him to abandon that, and he engaged in work for the farmers...

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