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Location: Phillips County AR

Biography of John S. Phelps

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN S. Phelps; This well-known citizen of the State of Missouri was born in Sunburn County, Conn., December 22, 1810, and came of English stock, his early ancestors having come to this country from England and settled in the State of Massachusetts some time prior to the year 1630. In about 1633 they migrated to Connecticut and founded the town of Windsor, where the family became well known and many of its members attained posi-of prominence. His father, Elish Phelps, was a distinguished lawyer, who for many years held a front rank at the bar of Hartford, and he was frequently honored with public trusts, having been at different times a member of the upper and lower house of the Connecticut Legislature, and twice Speaker of the House. He was also comptroller of the State and was a com-missioner to revise the statutes of that State. He represented his district three times in Congress, where he distinguished himself as an able legislator. He was called from life in 1847. His father, Noah Phelps, served his country as a Revolutionary soldier, in which he attained the rank of captain, and his eldest son was also a soldier in that war. Noah Phelps was a member of the committee that planned the capture of Ticonderoga and lent his...

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Slave Narrative of Fannie Alexander

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Fannie Alexander Location: Helena, Arkansas Age: 62 Occupation: Teacher “I was an orphant child. My mother-in-law told me during slavery she was a field hand. One day the overseer was going to whoop one of the women ’bout sompin or other and all the women started with the hoes to him and run him clear out of the field. They would killed him if he hadn’t got out of the way. She said the master hadn’t put a overseer over them for a long time. Some of ’em wouldn’t do their part and he put one of the men on the place over the women. He was a colored foreman. The women worked together and the men worked together in different fields. My mother-in-law was named Alice Drummond. She said they would cut the hoecakes in half and put that in your pan, then pour the beef stew on top. She said on Christmas day they had hot biscuits. They give them flour and things to make biscuit at home on Sundays. When they got through eating they take their plate and say, ‘Thank God for what I received.’ She said they had plenty milk. The churns was up high—five gallon churns. Some churns was cedar wood. The children would...

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Slave Narrative of Charles Anderson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Charles Anderson Location: Helena, Arkansas Age: 77 or 78, not sure “I was born in Bloomfield, Kentucky. My parents had the same owners. Mary and Elgin Anderson was their names. They was owned by Isaac Stone. Davis Stone was their son. They belong to the Stones as far back as they could remember. Mama was darker than I am. My father was brighter than I am. He likely had a white father. I never inquired. Mama had colored parents. Master Stone walked with a big crooked stick. He nor his son never went to war. Masters in that country never went. Two soldiers were drafted off our place. I saw the soldiers, plenty of them and plenty times. There never was no serious happenings. “The Federal soldiers would come by, sleep in the yard, take our best horses and leave the broken down ones. Very little money was handled. I never seen much. Master Stone would give us money like he give money to Davis. They prized fine stock mostly. They needed money at wheat harvest time only. When a celebration or circus come through he give us all twenty-five or thirty cents and told us to go. There wasn’t many slaves up there like down in this country. The...

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Slave Narrative of Carrie Bradley Logan Bennett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Carrie Bradley Logan Bennett Age: 79 plus Location: Helena, Arkansas “I was born not a great piece from Mobile but it was in Mississippi in the country. My mother b’long to Massa Tom Logan. He was a horse trader. He got drowned in 1863—durin’ of the War, the old war. His wife was Miss Liza Jane. They had several children and some gone from home I jus’ seed when they be on visits home. The ones at home I can recollect was Tiney, John, Bill, and Alex. I played wid Tiney and nursed Bill and Alex was a baby when Massa Tom got drowned. “We never knowed how Massa Tom got drowned. They brought him home and buried him. His horse come home. He had been in the water, water was froze on the saddle. They said it was water soaked. They thought he swum the branch. Massa Tom drunk some. We never did know what did happen. I didn’t know much ’bout ’em. “He had two or three families of slaves. Ma cooked, washed and ironed for all on the place. She went to the field in busy times. Three of the men drove horses, tended to ’em. They fed ’em and curried and sheared ’em. Ma said Massa...

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Kaskinampo Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Kaskinampo Tribe: Meaning unknown, though -nampo may be the Koasati word for “many.” Kaskinampo Connections. The Kaskinampo were probably closely related to the Koasati, and through them to the Alabama, Choctaw, and other Muskhogean people. Kaskinampo Location. Their best-known historic location was on the lower end of an island in the Tennessee River, probably the one now called Pine Island. (See also Arkansas.) Kaskinampo History. There is every reason to believe that this tribe constituted the Casqui, Icasqui, or Casquin “province” which De Soto entered immediately after crossing the Mississippi River, and it was probably in what is now Phillips County, Arkansas. We hear of the Kaskinampo next in connection with the expeditions of Marquette and Joliet but do not learn of their exact location until 1701, when they seem to have been on the lower end of the present Pine Island. We are informed, however, by one of the French explorers that they had previously lived upon Cumberland River, and there is evidence that, when they first moved to the Tennessee, they may have settled for a short time near its mouth. Both the Cumberland and the Tennessee were known by their name, and it stuck persistently to the latter stream until well along in the eighteenth century. After the early years of the eighteenth...

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Houses of the Quapaw Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Quapaw, the southernmost tribe of the Dhegiha group, occupied several villages west of the Mississippi, near the mouth of the Arkansas. When the closely allied tribes had removed from their ancient habitat in the upper valley of the Ohio, and had arrived at the mouth of that stream, the Quapaw are believed to have, turned southward while the others went northward. The name of the tribe, Quapaw, signifies “downstream people;” Omaha being translated “those going against the wind or current.” As a people they seem to have been known to the members of the De Soto expedition about 1541, probably occupying villages on or near the sites of the settlements visited by the French during the latter part of the next century. Père Marquette, while on his memorable journey down the Mississippi, in the year 1673, went as far as the mouth of the Arkansas, where he lingered a few days before returning northward on July 17. The villages of the Quapaw, designated the Arkansa, were reached, but the habitations were only briefly described: “Their cabins, which are long and wide, are made of bark; they sleep at the two extremities, which are raised about two feet from the ground. They keep their corn in large baskets, made of cane, or in gourds, as large...

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Chitty, William Edward – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now W. E. Chitty, Formerly of Pine Bluff, Lost Life in River—Helena, May 17–(Special)– The body of W. E. Chitty, age 60, who disappeared between the hours of 7 and 8 p.m. Tuesday, off the Chicago Mill and Lumber Corporation’s derrick boat, was found early this morning, near the bank of the river about a mile below where it is thought he stumbled from the boat and fell into the river. Chitty, prior to his moving to Helena about two months ago, had lived in West Helena where he had been employed as night watchman for the Chicago Mill and the Pekin Wood Products Co. plants. For the past two months he had been employed as a newspaper carrier. He had given this up last Sunday. William McWherter, operator of the derrick boat, stated that Chitty came to him about two weeks past and asked for permission to sleep on the boat, inasmuch as he had no funds to pay rent. This privilege was granted him. Last Tuesday evening he was found in a deep ravine beside the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley railroad incline, in an intoxicated condition. Two river men carried him to the derrick boat. Chitty was missed from the boat Tuesday night but it was thought he had left and gone up town. Later...

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Phillips County, Arkansas Census

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Phillips County, Arkansas was formed from Pike County in 1820. 1830 Phillips County, Arkansas Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Phillips County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1830 Census Index Free 1830 Census Transcription Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Phillips County, Arkansas Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 Phillips County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1840 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Phillips County, Arkansas Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1850 Phillips County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1850 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Phillips County, Arkansas Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Free 1860 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1860 Phillips County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Phillips County, Arkansas Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Free 1870 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com –...

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Phillips County, Arkansas Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Arkansas Cemeteries Chamberlain Cemetery Confederate Military Cemetery Dixon Cemetery Maple Hill Cemetery (partial) Hosted at Phillips County, USGenWeb Project Confederate Military Cemetery Hosted at Arkansas Ties $$$ Morning Star Index Salem Cemetery (partial) Schaffhauser Cemetery (partial)...

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Biography of Earl C. Bronaugh

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Bronaugh, Earl C., one of the most prominent attorneys of the State, was born in Abingdon, Virginia, March 4, 1831. He secured his educational advantages in his native town prior to reaching the age of twelve years, when with his parents he moved to Shelby County, Tennessee. They founded a new home in the woods and endured all the privations of pioneer life at that early day. Here Mr. Bronaugh spent six years of his life, assisting his father in the support of the family, after which becoming imbued with the desire to read law he entered the office of Hon. J. W. Clapp, an uncle, at Holley Springs, Mississippi, and two years thereafter, in 1851, was admitted to the bar. Being without means to begin the practice of his profession he spent the following two years in teaching in Tennessee and Arkansas. He then began the practice of his profession at Jacksonport, Arkansas. A few months later he removed to Little Rock, Arkansas, where he served for a short time as Clerk of the Chancery Court. From Little Rock he moved to Brownville, Arkansas, where he remained for two years, when he located in Helena in the same State. He was elected Judge of the Circuit Court, comprising the Helena circuit, in 1860, which office...

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