Location: Philadelphia County PA

Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

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Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on...

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Biograhy of Dennis Heartt

If history consists of the lives of great men, whose names are “wrought into the verbs of language, their works and effigies in our houses,” North Carolina should contribute many pages to the epitome of civilization; for her institutions, public and private, have been established by men of superior abilities, who have spared neither time nor resources in the founding of a great State. In journalism, as in economic and political growth, the pioneer work has been done by men of strong personal character, who possessed the art of citizenship as well as the talents requisite for their chosen work. These editors, though the remains of their labor often seem eccentric when compared with our modern journals, had great influence among the people, and their memories are forever perpetuated in the ideals of the State they served so well. Among these pioneers of our press none were purer in public and private life, more energetic, or held greater favor throughout the State than Dennis Heartt, the founder, and for nearly fifty years the editor, of the Hillsborough Recorder. Like many of our best citizens, Mr. Heartt was not a native Carolinian. His father was an English sea captain, who settled in New England. Here, in the village of North Bradford, Connecticut, November 6, 1783, Dennis Heartt was born. Very little is known of the young man’s early life. In...

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Genealogy of William Allen Family of Philadelphia-pennsylvania

M145 WILLIAM ALLEN: b. in Dungannon, Ireland, and d. in Philadelphia in 1725. He was an eminent merchant in the latter city. Allen m. Mary, dau. of Thomas and Susanne Budd. They had (1) John, James, William, b. Aug. 5, 1704, was Chief Justice of Philadelphia and d. in London, England, in 1780, and Thomas, who d. in Churchtown, N. Y., in 1794. He m. Elizabeth Shadwick. Their ch. include: (A) Thomas: b. 1742 and d. 1755. (B) John B.: d. July 26, 1777. (C) William: b. 1756 and d. Oct. 11, 1833. All of the above lived and died at Taghkanic, N. Y. William m. Jane Shauerman and had John, 1778-1831; Thomas, 1780-1859; William, 1787-1855; Nicholas, 1792-1839; James, 1789-1869; Samuel, 1798-1871; Henry, 1800-1890; Jeremiah, 1805-1896; Elizabeth, 1784-1860, and Peter, b. 1782 and d. 1865. He m. Hannah Covel and had twelve ch., including (a) Henry Lewis: b. Oct. 8, 1819; m. Elizabeth Macy. Their ch. include: 1. John Howard: b. in New Jersey, July 28, 1857. 2. Charles Edward: b. 1863; m. Elizabeth Hallenbeck. One son, Donald, b. 1904. 3. Clifford Henry: b. 1868; m. Helen Rossman, Albany, N. Y. Deceased m., second, Anna Lynn, Toronto, Can. 4. Lewis Warren: b. Nov. 21, 1865; m. Edna Wallace Ewer. One dau., Miriam Elizabeth, b. at Hartford, Conn., 1898, and d....

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Biographical Sketch of Luther C. Challis

Perhaps Luther C. Challis, nearly forty years a citizen of Atchison, is best known as a pioneer railroad man. He was born in New Jersey January 26, 1829, and for some years before moving West was engaged in business in Philadelphia and Boonville, Missouri. In 1855 he located in Atchison and joined his brother as one of the first merchants of that town. He afterward became a banker, and maintained a profitable ferry across the Missouri River until the building of the bridge in 1875. Mr. Challis was elected to a seat in the Territorial Council of 1857-58, made vacant by the resignation of Joseph P. Carr in January, 1858. He is generally conceded to be the father of the Central Branch of the Union Pacifie Railroad, having framed the bill to authorize its construction, secured its passage, and negotiated the treaty with the Kickapoo Indians for securing its right-of-way through their territory. Mr. Challis was also one of the incorporators of the Atchison & St. Joseph Railway, the first railroad built in the state, and one of the founders of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. He died in Atchison, July 26,...

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Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he was transterred to the history burean of the commission at Washington, remaining there...

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Biographical Sketch of W. A. L. Thompson

More than ordinary interest always attaches to the man who builds up a business, whether it be a farm, a store is factory or whatsoever establishment that serves the peeple in its line and had the usefulness of an institution. Forty years of careful and painetaking merchandising have been behind the well known Topeka house of W. A. L. Thompson Hardware Company, one of the oldest and most standard mercantile firms of the state. Born near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, April 18, 1848, W. A. L. Thompson was reared in his native state, and lived in Philadelphia from 1866 until he came to Kansas in May, 1869. After several months at Topeka he spent about a year at Park City, was the owner of a general store where he enjoyed a good business from the Texas cattlemen on the old Chisholm Trail until 1872, then moving to Hutchinson, Reno County, where he helped organize the county and was the first candidafe for county attorney. Having traded his Southern Kansas property for a herd of cattle, he moved to Topeka, and remained in the cattle business for three years, then founded what is now the W. A. L. Thompson Hardware Company. He started with a modest stock, but had built it up to be the largest jobbing and retail establishment of its kind in Kansas. On January 7, 1876, Mr. Thompson married...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Taylor

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Jim Taylor Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Talbot County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1847 Place of Residence: 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: 89 Reference: Personal interview with Jim Taylor, at his home, 424 E. 23rd St., Baltimore. “I was born in Talbot County, Eastern Shore, Maryland, near St. Michaels about 1847. Mr. Mason Shehan’s father knew me well as I worked for him for more than 30 years after the emancipation. My mother and father both were owned by a Mr. Davis of St. Michaels who had several tugs and small boats. In the summer, the small boats were used to haul produce while the tugs were used for towing coal and lumber on the Chesapeake Bay and the small rivers on the Eastern Shore. Mr. Davis bought able-bodied colored men for service on the boats. They were sail boats. I would say about 50 or 60 feet long. On each boat, besides the Captain, there were from 6 to 10 men used. On the tugs there were more men, besides the mess boy, than on the sail boats. “I think a man by the name of Robinson who was in the coal business at Havre de Grace engaged Mr. Davis to tow several barges of soft coal to St. Michaels. It was on July 4th when we arrived at Havre de...

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Slave Narrative of Rev. Silas Jackson

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Rev. Silas Jackson Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Virginia Date of Birth: 1846 or 47 Place of Residence: 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: (about) 90 Reference: Personal interview with Rev. Silas Jackson, ex-slave, at his home, 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore. “I was born at or near Ashbie’s Gap in Virginia, either in the year of 1846 or 47. I do not know which, but I will say I am 90 years of age. My father’s name was Sling and mother’s Sarah Louis. They were purchased by my master from a slave trader in Richmond, Virginia. My father was a man of large stature and my mother was tall and stately. They originally came from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, I think from the Legg estate, beyond that I do not know. I had three brothers and two sisters. My brothers older than I, and my sisters younger. Their names were Silas, Carter, Rap or Raymond, I do not remember; my sisters were Jane and Susie, both of whom are living in Virginia now. Only one I have ever seen and he came north with General Sherman, he died in 1925. He was a Baptist minister like myself. “The only things I know about my grandparents were: My grandfather ran away through the aid of Harriet Tubman and went to Philadelphia and...

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Slave Narrative of Page Harris

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Page Harris Location: Camp Parole, Maryland Place of Birth: Charles County MD Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: Campe Parole, A. A. C. Co., MD Reference: Personal interview with Page Harris at his home, Camp Parole, A.A.C. Co., Md. “I was born in 1858 about 3 miles west of Chicamuxen near the Potomac River in Charles County on the farm of Burton Stafford, better known as Blood Hound Manor. This name was applied because Mr. Stafford raised and trained blood hounds to track runaway slaves and to sell to slaveholders of Maryland, Virginia and other southern states as far south as Mississippi and Louisiana. “My father’s name was Sam and mother’s Mary, both of whom belonged to the Staffords and were reared in Charles County. They reared a family of nine children, I being the oldest and the only one born a slave, the rest free. I think it was in 1859 or it might be 1860 when the Staffords liberated my parents, not because he believed in the freedom of slaves but because of saving the lives of his entire family. “Mrs. Stafford came from Prince William County, Virginia, a county on the west side of the Potomac River in Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford had a large rowboat that they used on the Potomac as a fishing and oyster boat as well...

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Slave Narrative of “Parson” Rezin Williams

Interviewer: Stansbury Person Interviewed: Rezin (Parson) Williams Date of Interview: September 18 and 24, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Date of Birth: March 11, 1822 Age: 116 Place of Residence: 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, MD References: Baltimore Morning Sun, December 10, 1928. Registration Books of Board of Election Supervisors Baltimore Court House. Personal interviews with “Parson” Rezin Williams, on Thursday afternoon, September 18 and 24, 1937, at his home, 2610 Pierpont Street, Mount Winans, Baltimore, Md. Oldest living Negro Civil War veteran; now 116 years old. Oldest registered voter in Maryland and said to be the oldest “freeman” in the United States. Said to be oldest member of Negro family in America with sister and brother still living, more than a century old. Father worked for George Washington. In 1864 when the State Constitution abolished slavery and freed about 83,000 Negro slaves in Maryland, there was one, “Parson” Rezin Williams, already a freeman. He is now living at the age of 116 years, in Baltimore City, Maryland, credited with being the oldest of his race in the United States who served in the Civil War. He was born March 11, 1822, at “Fairview”, near Bowie, Prince Georges County, Maryland—a plantation of 1000 acres, then belonging to Governor Oden Bowie’s father. “Parson” Williams’ father, Rezin Williams, a freeman, was born at “Mattaponi”, near Nottingham, Prince Georges County, the estate...

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Slave Narrative of James Wiggins

Person Interviewed: James Wiggins Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1850-1851 Place of Residence: 625 Barre St. Reference: Personal interview with James Wiggins, ex-slave, at his home, 625 Barre St. “I was born in Anne Arundel County, on a farm near West River about 1850 or 1851, I do not know which. I do not know my father or mother. Peter Brooks, one of the oldest colored men in the county, told me that my father’s name was Wiggins. He said that he was one of the Revells’ slaves. He acquired my father at an auction sale held in Baltimore at a high price from a trader who had an office on Pratt Street about 1845. He was given a wife by Mr. Revell and as a result of this union I was born. My father was a carpenter by trade, he was hired out to different farmers by Mr. Revell to repair and build barns, fences and houses. I have been told that my father could read and write. Once he was charged with writing passes for some slaves in the county, as a result of this he was given 15 lashes by the sheriff of the county, immediately afterwards he ran away, went to Philadelphia, where he died while working to save money to purchase mother’s freedom, through a white...

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Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: December 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “No, I ain’ cold. I settin in de sun. Miss Ida, she went by here just now en call at me bout de door been open en lettin dat cold wind blow in on my back wid all de fire gone out. I tell her, it ain’ botherin me none, I been settin out in de sun. Well, I don’ feel much to speak bout, child, but I knockin round somehow. Miss Ida, she bring me dis paper to study on. She does always be bringin me de Star cause she know dat I love to see de news of Marion. It right sad bout de Presbyterian preacher, but everybody got to die, I say. Right sad though. We hear dat church bell here de other evenin en we never know what it been tollin for. I holler over dere to Maggie house en ax her how-come de church bell tollin, but she couldn’ tell me nothin bout it. Reckon some chillun had get hold of it, she say. I tell her, dat bell never been pull by no chillun cause I been hear death note in it. Yes, honey, de people sho gwine horne (grieve) after Dr. Holladay.” “I say, I doin very well myself en I thankful I...

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William Davis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

c154 WILLIAM DAVIS: b. near Philadelphia, 1756; had two brothers, Henry and Jonas; served in the Revolutionary War for four yrs.; in 1784 m. Isabella Scott; had with other issue (1) Henry: b. 1787; d. 1860; m. Jane Johnston; was a sergeant in Capt. Leiper’s Company in War of 1812. One of the founders of New Sheffield, Pa., and was a surveyor, an astronomer and a driller of salt wells. (A) Isabella: b. 1814; d. 1862; m. Johnston Calhoun. (B) James S.: b. 1815, d. 1897; m. Maria Flanegin, 1840. Ch. incd: (a) Francis F.: b. 1845; m. Abbie Stout. (b) Henry A.: b. 1855; d. 1910; m. Elizabeth McCleary. (c) James E.: b. 1858; m. Maude Powell. (C) William Henry: b. 1816; d. 1865; m. Mary Calhoun. (a) Joseph. (b) Alice: m. Miller Kenton. (c) Henry K. (d) Horace: (M.D.). Served in Civil War; m. Kate (?) and had Paul and Grace. (D) John (Rev.): b. 1821; m. Emma Hays; had Eva who m. Dr. Win. Huselton. John Davis was an inventor as well as a minister. Eva had three ch.—Norman, d. v., Roma m. Capt. O’Brien), and Frances (m. John Bancroft). (E) Jane J.: b. 1850; m. George S. Davis. (2) William. (3) Alexander: b. 1796; d. 1857; m. Elizabeth Shafer, 1819. Their ch. include: (A) William Hugh: b. 1822; d. 1907; m. Jane S. Davis, 1849....

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Biography of Richard Johnson Payne, M. D.

Making his advent into professional circles in St. Louis in 1913 as an interne in Bethesda Hospital, Dr. Richard Johnson Payne has continuously engaged in practice in this city save for the period of his service in charge of the ear, nose and throat department of Base Hospital, No. 20, in France during the World war. Thorough study, earnest purpose and close adherence to the highest standards of the profession have gained for him a creditable place and large practice. Missouri numbers him among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Fayette on the 14th of April, 1888. He is a son of William Payne, also a native of Missouri and descended from ancestry from Virginia and Kentucky. The grandfather, Richard Payne, came to Missouri in the early part of the nineteenth century and settled in Howard county, where he engaged extensively in farming and stock raising and also became identified with banking. The father was reared and educated in Howard county, where he, too, engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years but is now living retired. He married Nannie May Walker, a native of that county and representative of one of its old pioneer families, her father being John Walker, a prominent statesman, who at one time filled the position of auditor of Missouri. Mrs. Payne passed away in 1900, at the age of thirty-nine years. In the...

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