Location: Perry County OH

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Biographical Sketch of Joel K. Goodin

Joel K. Goodin, an early lawyer and legislator and a free-state leader, was born at Somerset, Perry County, Ohio, February 24, 1824. He received an academic education, after which he took up the study of law. Early in 1854 he was admitted to the bar in his native state and the following June located upon the Wakarusa River in what is now Douglas County, Kansas. Mr. Goodin was a delegate to the Big Springs convention; was clerk of the lower house of the Topeka Legislature until it was dispersed by Colonel Sumner; was secretary of the council in the free-state Legislature of 1858, and the same year began the practice of law in Douglas County, but soon afterward removed to Ottawa. In 1866 he was elected to represent Franklin County in the Legislature, and was re-elected in 1867. While a member of the House he assisted in organizing the State School for the Deaf at Olathe. Mr. Goodin died at Ottawa on December 9,...

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Biographical Sketch of James E. Madden

This well known and representative business man is one of the prominent citizens of Ontario, where he owns and operates a fine, large livery and feed stable having fine and comfortable rigs and good horses, and manifesting a careful supervision for the comfort and safety of his patrons. Mr. Madden was born in Perry County, Ohio on May 31, 1849, being the son of Hezekiah and Mary Madden, natives of Ohio, also. While still a child he was brought by his parents to Putnam county, in the native state, and in 1813 they came thence to Mills county, Iowa. He was reared on a farm, having but limited opportunity to gain educational training, but by dint of hard labor and making the best of the log school house’ privileges, he received his training. In 1874 he came to The Dalles and one year later returned to Iowa, where, in 1876, July 29, he contracted a marriage with Miss L. A. Barnett. They remained there two years on the home place, then bought a farm and tilled it until 1882, in which year he moved to Saunders county, Nebraska, purchased a farm and remained there until 1887. The last year mentioned was the time he migrated to Oregon, locating at Westfall, on Bully creek, Malheur county. He engaged in sheep raising, but later sold them and bought cattle and in...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry King

It is not the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. Henry King. He learned the printer’s trade because the attraction was irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force impelling him to reduce the workings of his mind to written form–and it was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and his “copy” was the perfection of chirography. As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his home town, LaHarpe, Illinois. This work was interrupted by a four years’ service in the army in 1861-65. Returning from the army, he engaged in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, at Quincy, Illinois, of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, in 1883, first as contributing editor,...

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Biography of James W. Jenney, M. D.

James W. Jenney, M. D. Among many other titles of distinction Dr. James W. Jenny, whose name is professionally known in almost every state in the Union, enjoys that of pioneer physician at Salina, Kansas, which city had been his permanent home for forty-six years. He came here a young man, in the first flush of professional success, earnest and ambitious, and the passage of time had in no way lessened his devotion to medical science. James W. Jenney comes of solid old Quaker stock. He was born in a log cabin on his father’s farm in Huron County, Ohio, October 26, 1846. His parents were Abraham D. and Sallie Ann (Griffin) Jenney. His father was born at New Bedford, Massachusetts, in May, 1813, and at the age of ten years he accompanied his parents to Ohio, in which state he spent the rest of his life, dying July 7, 1900. For many years he engaged in farming in Huron County. In 1842 he was united in marriage with Sallie Ann Griffin, who was born in 1821 in Catskill County, New York, the second in a family of nine children born to Henry and Elizabeth (Merritt) Griffin. Her death took place October 13, 1884. There were eight children born to Abraham D. and Sallie Ann Jenney, five sons and three danghters: James W.; George, who died at the age...

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Biography of Robert H. Barton

One of the well known citizens of Moscow is Robert H. Barton, who is now capably serving as postmaster. He is true and faithful to this public trust and at all times has discharged his duties of citizenship with the same promptness and fidelity which marked his course when on the battlefields of the south he followed the starry banner to victory and thus aided in the preservation of the Union. He came to Moscow in 1877. His birth occurred in Perry County, Ohio, February 1, 1842, and he is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His grandfather, Robert Barton, emigrated from the north of Ireland to the New World and located in Baltimore, Maryland, where Andrew Barton, father of our subject, was born, in 181 1, The latter married Miss Elizabeth Biddison, also a native of Baltimore, and a daughter of William Biddison, a soldier of the war of 1812. They were farming people, and in 1833 removed to Perry County, Ohio, where the father improved a farm and reared his family. He died on the old homestead which he had acquired through his own industry, passing away in 1883, at the age of seventy-two years. His wife died in 1876, at the age of sixty-three years. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom grew to years of maturity, while...

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Biography of Jacob Smith

Jacob Smith, of Topeka, was one of the notable pioneers of Kansas. He lived in this state half a century. During this time he distinguished himself by a large degree of constructive enterprise in various business affairs. He was a pioneer merchant at Topeka, was also one of the early county officials, was a banker, was interested in the building of railroads and was throughout noted as a man of unusual sound judgment, of great foresight and discernment, and of absolute integrity. The record of his life as given in the following paragraphs is essentially a part of Kansas history. He was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, near Reading, June 24, 1829, and died at his home in Topeka, November 30, 1908. His parents and grandparents were natives of Pennsylvania, their families having come to this country from Leipsic, Germany, at a very early date. When he was two years old in 1831 his father, John Smith, and mother, Hannah Darsham, moved to Somerset, Perry County, Ohio. He received a good education in the country schools and one item of his early experience was clerking in the Boyden Store, where one of his classmates, Phil Sheridan, was also employed. Phil Sheridan later became the dashing cavalry leader and one of the most distinguished generals of the Civil war. In April, 1852, Jacob Smith married Jane K. Von Cannon, at...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac Johnson

Isaac Johnson, farmer, Section 10, Township 5, Range 6, P. O. Randall Station, came to Kansas in April, 1870, and located on his farm, in Allen Township, Jewell County, where he has resided since. He is a member of the Church of the United Brethren. He participated in the last war as a member of Company A, Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted in Nelsonville, Athens Co., Ohio, July 25, 1862, and was discharged at Washington, D. C., and June 29, 1865. He took part in the battles of Hoover’s Gap, Tenn., and Chickamauga, where he was severely wounded through the arm and shoulder, from which he suffers today. Mr. Johnson was born in Perry County, Ohio, December 30, 1829, and lived in his native State until his forty-second year, when he removed to Guthrie County, Iowa, where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was married in Morgan County, Ohio, in 1848, to Miss Ellender Teeter, a native of Ohio. They have four children living – Samuel Emmet (married to Miss Lizzie Cox, a native of Indiana), and G. William (a resident of Robinson Township; married to Miss Tavey Hachett, a native of Christie County, Ill.); Ida and Auwilda. Mr. Johnson has a bottom farm of eighty acres, mostly in cultivation. There is a peach orchard on the place, which contains 600 young and thrifty trees....

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Biography of Joseph L. Strickler

Joseph L. Strickler. In reviewing the lives of the business men of Cherryvale, especially in regard to the establishment and growth of the oil industry, it who have taken part in this work have been those who have brought with them from other parts of the state and country reputations for honorable dealing, and capability for accomplishment of purpose. Associated with the oil industry of this part of the state is the name of Joseph L. Strickler, who came to Cherryvale in 1902 and is now probably the largest independent producer in this locality. Mr. Strickler has been identified with the oil business practically since he started upon his career and has had experience in various fields. He was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, December 19, 1872, and is a son of William Baker and Mary (Foutz) Strickler. The Strickler family is of German origin and was founded in America previous to the Revolution, the American progenitor settling in the colony of Virginia. John Strickler, the grandfather of Joseph L., was born in 1808, in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and was a marble cutter by trade, but on going as a pioneer to Fairfield County, Ohio, took up farming as his vocation and homesteaded 160 acres. He also built the old half-way house between Lancaster and Pleasantville, which he conducted for many years, and there continued to reside...

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Biographical Sketch of William N. Taylor

Taylor, William N.; mnfgr.; born, New Straitsville, August, 1879; son of Thomas and Ester Taylor; educated, common schools, New Straitsville; finished in mechanical engineering; married, Cleveland, Aug. 9, 1904, Mary A. Beerer; issue, one son and one daughter; active in politics, but has never run for any office; organized The Taylor Machine Co., which manufactures dairy supplies and gear cutting; has interest in several important patents; member Y. M. C. A., Foresters. Recreations: Motoring and...

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Biography of Lewis C. Nelson .

Lewis C. Nelson. The large industries in and about Coffeyville have naturally drawn to that city many of the expert technical men as well as business executives, and one of these is Lewis C. Nelson, superintendent of the Ludowici-Celadon Company, manufacturers of hollow roofing tile. Mr. Nelson as a young man became an expert wood worker, later developed a proficiency and familiarity with the pottery industry and for a number of years has been one of the trusted officials of the present company. His birth occurred in Glasgow, Scotland, July 15, 1871. His father Charles W. Nelson, who was born in the vicinity of Glasgow in 1842 was a weaver in the woolen mills, and died at Glasgow in 1884. He was a conservative in politics and an active member of the Episconal Church. He received military training as a soldier in the English army. Charles W. Nelson married Ida Froley, who was born near Glasgow in 1847 and died there in 1877. L. C. Nelson, the only child of his parents, was six years old when his mother died, and thereafter he received a rudimentary training in the public schools of Glasgow. At the age of twelve he was brought to the United States by his uncle John Nelson, who established his home at Boston. Since that time Mr. Nelson has been largely dependent upon his own resources...

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Biography of Joseph Kennedy Hudson, General

Gen. Joseph Kennedy Hudson. One of the ablest soldiers of Kansas and most determined fighter for the free-state movement, the late General Hudson will have a lasting fame not only for what he did in the trying years of Kansas’ youth, but also as founder and for many years editor of the Topeka Capital. It was his resourcefulness as a practical newspaper man and his wonderful ability as an editor and molder of public opinion that gave the Capital its wide influence and standing as a journal, and the history of the Kansas Press had no more notable figure than Joseph Kennedy Hudson. It is not the purpose of this article to describe in detail the history of the Topeka Capital. That belongs to other pages. But something should be said of General Hudson’s personal relations with that journal and also of his ability and personality as an editor. It was in 1873 that he purchased the Kansas Farmer and moved it from Leavenworth to Topeka. He continued to edit and publish this paper until 1879. In March of the latter year he began the publication of the Topeka Daily Capital, now owned by Governor Capper. To the task of making a metropolitan daily paper with at least a state wide influence, General Hudson brought keen foresight, rare judgment, magnificent courage and a fund of energy and endurance that...

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King, John – Obituary

Elgin, Union County, Oregon A Direct Descendant of the Pilgrim Fathers, and an Honered Pioneer of Eastern Oregon At the home of his daughter, Mrs. E.L. Harris, in Elgin. December 12, 1904. John King, aged 84 years, 9 months, 10 days. The deceased was among the well known citizens of Union and Wallowa counties, in which territory he had made his home since 1882. A son of Jacob King, one of Ohio’s pioneer settlers, he was able to trace his lineage directly to the Pilgrim Fathers, whose landing at Plymouth Rock in 1820 (Says 1820) marked one of the events which were to have distinctive quality in the history of our land. He was the third born in a family of eight children and was born near Zanesville, in Perry County, Ohio, March 2, 1820 of which family only three are now living. In 1849, on July 4th, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria A. Dawson, and to this union was born eight children, four of whom are now living. In early manhood he hewed out his home in the timbered regions on the south bank of the Maumee river, thirty miles from Teledo, Ohio, and here it was that his own family was born and reared. here, too, at his early home, he was wont to receive visits from many of Ohio’s great pioneers, among whom...

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Biographical Sketch of D. A. Bowman

D. A. Bowman, blacksmith and general jobber; P. O. Humbolt, Ill.; was born in Perry Co., Ohio, Dec. 5, 1845. He married Miss Sarah McCravy Oct. 1, 1867; she was born in East Tennessee; they had three children, two living, viz., Charles A. and Lydia L. He lived in Ohio three years, when, with his parents, he came to Illinois, and settled near Robinson; in 1860, he began to learn his trade with T. J. Sims, plow-manufacturer at that place, In 1864, he enlisted in the 135th III. Regt., he being Regimental Fifer; was discharged in November following, and began work at his trade with Mr. Stifle, of Stiflesville; next worked at Oblong City with Mr. Zugler; next with Mr. Sentney, in Humbolt; then with Miller & Miller, of Mattoon, and, in August, 1866, he began work in Arcola for Mr. Jacobs, and, in June, 1867, he worked in Humbolt for Mr. Sentney, and, in October, after his marriage, he went in partnership with Mr. Jacobs, of Arcola; in 1868, he worked for Mr. Garrett, in Windsor, and, in 1869, he opened a shop of his own in Arcola; in the fall of the same year, he came to Humbolt and carried on wagon and carriage making and blacksmithing; in 1874, he sold his wagon business and rented out his blacksmith-shop and took a position at Homer in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Adam Whitmer

Adam Whitmer, farmer; P. O. Humbolt. The subject of this sketch was born in Perry Co., Ohio, Dec. 26,1832; he married Miss Olara Jane Bugh Nov. 1, 1864; she was born same place Jan 11, 1838; they have three children, viz., Laura, Elmo and Eva. He lived in Ohio until 1854, when he came to Illinois and settled in Crawford Co., where he lived one year; he then went to Dakota and engaged with a Government surveying party; he camped for two and a half years, where Yankton now stands; he lived in Dakota until 1859, when he went to Colorado and engaged in mining, and lived there until 1864, when he returned to Ohio, and in 1865 he came to Coles Co., Ill., and settled on his present place and has lived here since. He has been Township Collector one year and School Director some five or six years. He owns 160 acres, in this township, which he has earned by his own labor and...

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