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Location: Peoria Illinois

Street, Victoria Hewitt – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mrs. Leslie Street passed away at her home in Sturgis Saturday evening [April 20, 1965]. Jesse [Victoria] Hewitt Street was born in Streeter, Ill., March 16, 1878, where she grew to womanhood and was married at Peoria, Ill., in 1899 to Leslie Street. They came to South Dakota in 1911, settling near Faith where they lived until 1945 when they moved to Sturgis. Mrs. Street passed away here in 1949. She is survived by one son, Harry of Rapid City; two daughters, Mrs. May Fuller of Rapid City and Mrs. Evelyn Marshall of Clayton, Idaho; one sister, Mrs. Alice Yeast of Seattle, Wash. and six grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren. Four brothers and four sisters preceded her in death. Funeral services were held Tuesday from the F. O. Jolley Funeral Home with Rev. Donald Gover officiating. Special music was provided by Mrs. Elaine Owens and George Minier. Pallbearers were Merle Miller, John Detjen, Les Babcock, Dan Regan, George Alt, and Kelly Donaldson. Interment was in the Bear Butte Cemetery. Sturgis Tribune, April 21, 1965 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Fred Eugene Pettit

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Fred Eugene Pettit is a veteran business man and merchant of Marion County, and until he retired a few years ago conducted one of the largest stores at Peabody. Mr. Pettit was reared and educated and gained his first mercantile experience in the State of Illinois. He was born at Wyoming in Stark County, Illinois, January 8, 1861, a son of Peter and Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit. Peter Pettit was born in New York State and located in Illinois in 1851, when the country was new and undeveloped. After a few years he lost his health and suffered invalidism throughout the latter part of his life. He died at the comparatively early age of forty-six years. Mary Anne (Bailey) Pettit was born in Devonshire, England, in 1830. When she was six years of age she came with her father to America. The Baileys first located at Oswego, New York, moved from there to Wisconsin for three years, and then returned to New York State and located near Syracuse. It was at Syracuse that Mary Bailey married Peter Pettit in 1851. After their marriage they moved to Wyoming, Illinois, and she continued to make her home in that state for many years, but finally came to Peabody, Kansas, where she died in September, 1911. Peter Pettit and...

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Peoria Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Peoria Indians (through French Peouarea, from Peoria Piwarea, ‘he comes carrying a pack on his back’: a personal name. Gerard). One of the principal tribes of the Illinois confederacy. Franquelin in his map of 1688 locates them and the Tapouaro on a river west of the Mississippi above the mouth of Wisconsin River, probably the upper Iowa River. Early references to the Illinois which place them on the Mississippi, although some of the tribes were on Rock and Illinois rivers, must relate to the Peoria and locate them near the mouth of the Wisconsin. When Marquette and Joliet descended the Mississippi in 1673, they found them and the Moingwena on the west side of the Mississippi near the mouth of a river supposed to be the Des Moines, though it may have been one farther north. When Marquette returned from the south, he found that the Peoria had removed and were near the lower end of the expansion of Illinois river, near the present Peoria. At the close of the war carried on by the Sauk and Foxes and other northern tribes against the Illinois, about 1768, the Kickapoo took possession of this village and made it their principal settlement. About the same time a large part of the Peoria crossed over into Missouri, where they...

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Biography of Hon. Samuel S. Guyer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Honorable Samuel S. Guyer was born at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1814. In his early manhood he was a contractor in New York City and in the construction of the Pennsylvania Canal System. In 1839, with his mother, sister and two brothers, he removed to Peoria, Illinois, from which base he engaged in the business of building flat boats and carrying cargos of merchandise to trade with the planters between Natchez and New Orleans. In the great tornado at Natchez in 1842, he lost all his possessions and barely escaped with his life. Returning to Peoria he studied law and qualified for the bar in the office of Mr. Knowlton, father of our former townsman, William S. Knowlton. In 1843 he came to Rock Island to practice his profession. He was appointed by the Court to defend the Redings, indicted for complicity in the murder of George Davenport, and he succeeded in securing their acquittal. In 1847 he was elected Sheriff of Rock Island County, which office he held for two terms. He was one of the incorporators of the Coal Valley Mining Company, and of the Rock Island and Peoria Railway Company, which road, then built only as far as Coal Valley, was under his management until 1861 when he sold his interests to...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry E. Brown

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mr. Henry E. Brown was born and uneducated in Elmwood, Peoria County, Illinois, until his sixteenth year when he moved to Peoria and entered the high school, afterwards entering Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa, from which he graduated in 1899, with the degree of Bachelor of Physics. Since then he has been connected with the Rock Island Public Schools, starting as a teacher and five years ago becoming principal of the high school. Mr. Brown has always been greatly interested in all educational matters and has received much recognition for his interest by educational associations. He is at the present time president of the Western Section of the Northern Illinois Teachers’ Association. He is also author of a text book which has had a very wide sale among the schools of the country. Mr. Brown is at present thirty-five years old, and was married in 1906 to Miss Bertha...

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Biography of Frank A. Landee

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now It is a safe presumption that Frank A. Landed the widely known retail grocer of Moline, is an example of self made manhood that is worthy of the most persistent and conscientious emulation. Mr. Landee was born in Kalmar, Sweden, August 11, 1852, and from the moment of his arrival in this country, his career has been marked by unceasing toil and honorable occupation and transactions. From a lad, wholly unknown, his rise has incessantly been in the ascendancy. He is at the present time a member of the Board of Directors of Augustana College; and is a member of the purchasing and building committee for the same institution; Treasurer and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Swedish Lutheran Church; Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Independent Order Odd Fellows Lodge No. 583 (Swedish) of Moline; Director of the Peoples Trust and Savings Bank; Vice-President of the Moline Furniture Works; Trustee of Court of Honor Lodge No. 100, of Moline; was President of the Swedish Republican State League during Yates governmental campaign; is an active member of the Moline Business Men’s Club; is one of the directors of the Retail Merchants Association in his home city, and holds and has held numerous other positions of trust and responsibility during his diligent lifetime. His...

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Biography of Francis Fletcher

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FRANCIS FLETCHER. – Mr. Fletcher was among the very earliest of the settlers of Oregon, being here two years before the establishment of the Provisional government, and has consequently seen the great development of this state and coast form its earliest inception; and he has himself been one of the most active to induce the progress of the last fifty years. He was born in Yorkshire, England, March 1, 1814, and, at the age of fourteen years, crossed the water to Ontario, Canada, and afterwards to Peoria, Illinois. In 1839, in company with Amos Cook and others, he started for Oregon. An interesting bit of his life’s history is the chapter dating from the spring in which he left Peoria. It was then and there he heard Reverend Jason Lee, who had been to Oregon, lecture upon the then almost unknown Pacific Northwest; and he was fired with a resolve to come to the land of the setting sun. A company of sixteen men was formed, of whom our subject was the most conspicuous. They started early in May and went to Independence, Missouri, where they exchanged their wagons for pack animals, and after one week’s delay went forward upon their trip across the mountains, deserts and plains to Oregon. After traveling about one hundred and...

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Biography of Amos Albert Belsley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Amos Albert Belsley has been a spirited factor in the business and civic life of Wellington, Kansas, for the past fourteen years. He is one of the leading real estate men of that section, and is a former mayor of the city. His birth occurred on a farm in Woodford County, Illinois, near Roanoke, August 24, 1878. He was the sixth in a family of nine children born to Peter and Cathrine (Schertz) Belsley. His father was born and reared in Woodford County, Illinois, and the grandfather, Peter Belsley, came from Alsace-Lorraine and settled in Illinois in 1830. Peter Belsley, the father, spent his active career as a general farmer and stock raiser, and died in October, 1899, while his wife now lives in Peoria, Illinois. He was very prominent as a democrat, and filled many places of trust in his community. He was president of the Roanoke Coal Mining Company of Roanoke, Illinois, from 1882 until the time of his death in October, 1909. Amos A. Belsley grew up on a farm, attended district school, and from the age of eleven to eighteen he had the opportunity of attending school for only three months each year. Later, as a preparation for his business career, he took a course in the Brown Business College of Peoria,...

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Biography of Joseph Holman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOSEPH HOLMAN. – This pioneer of the North Pacific was born in Devonshire, England, in 1817, and came to the United States when nineteen years of age. Three years later he was at Peoria, Illinois, at which place he listened to a lecture on Oregon by Reverend Jason Lee, and was one of the party organized to cross the plains which left early in the spring of 1839, reaching the Willamette after fourteen months of travel, toil, hardships and privation. Many of the incidents of his trip are mentioned in the biographical sketch of Francis Fletcher in this book, he being one of the party of four that remained together during the entire trip to Oregon Territory. The party that left Peoria consisted of sixteen, all of whom but four became dissatisfied upon reaching the junction of the Fort Bent and Santa Fé roads, and turned off upon the later. Holman’s party of four was determined to come on to Oregon, and adopted a motto, “Oregon or the Grave;” and Oregon it was. The three companions of Holman were Francis Fletcher, Amos Cook and R. Kilborne. They reached Brown’s Hole on Green river, where they wintered with Doctor Newell, chief trader of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the Indians, leaving early in February for Fort Hall,...

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Biography of James W. Layman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James W. Layman deceased, late of Santa Ana, was born in Peoria, Illinois, January 24, 1846. His parents, Martin and Elizabeth Layman, were from the State of New York, and had thirteen children, of whom James was the eighth. He was educated at Minneapolis, Minnesota, where his father had moved when the son was seven years old. He followed farming with his father in Minnesota until 1871, when he came to California. His first purchase here was a ranch near Newport, where he lived four years. He then purchased property on Main Street in Santa Ana, which he improved and converted into a beautiful home. Subsequently he bought the Santa Ana Hotel, of which he was the proprietor for eleven years. The brick block on Fourth Street, west of the First National Bank, stands as a monument to his enterprising spirit. Later he bought property on the corner of Sixth and Birch streets, where he erected a magnificent residence. He was a very liberal and public-spirited man, aided every enterprise both public and private, which had for its object the good of the people, and in his death Santa Ana lost one of her best citizens. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, having joined the order in Minnesota, at the age of nineteen years;...

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Biography of A. A. Dunseth

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A. A. Dunseth, Police Magistrate and Justice of the Peace, Oakland; born in Fleming Co., Ky., Oct. 12, 1821; he removed with his parents, when 6 years of age, to Ohio, where he learned and worked at the carpenter trade until 1843, when he came West and located at Peoria, Ill., working at his trade until 1852, when he removed to Georgetown, Ill., where he kept hotel two years, when he purchased a saw-mill, which he ran in connection with his trade until 1858, when he removed to Danville, and engaged in contracting and building until 1861, when he raised a company for the 4th Illinois Cavalry, but the regiment. having obtained its full quota of companies, his company was not accepted, the members joining other companies to fill up the regiment; in 1862, be visited the Union Hospitals at Louisville, Ky., and finding a wide field for labor in the interest of the soldiers of Illinois, he decided to remain there and labor in behalf of the same; he immediately entered upon this noble duty, laboring for the relief of suffering patriots of his State without compensation and defraying his own expenses for three months, when the hospital was visited by Dr. W. E. Fithian, J. L. Tincher and Judge Terry, of Danville; they at...

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Biographical Sketch of Edward Conaghan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Edward Conaghan, merchant, Oakland; born in County Donegal, Ireland, Aug. 15, 1841, where he engaged in farming until 18 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York in the fall of 1859; coming directly to Charleston, he engaged with his brother peddling, taking his stock of goods upon his back and selling from house to house; after following this for nine months for his brother, he commenced peddling on his own account, taking his first stock of goods, which invoiced at $20, in a pack upon his back, working in all kinds of weather, until 1863, when he associated with his brother and engaged in the hotel business at Peoria, Ill., which, proving unprofitable, they closed out, and, after paying all their indebtedness, he had barely enough means left to again start his portable dry goods and notion store, which consisted, as described above, of his pack, which he carried upon his back, buying his goods direct from first hands in New York, which enabled him to compete with the largest dealers in Coles Co.; he continued doing business in this manner until 1871, when he associated with David Jones, and located in Oakland in the grocery and queensware trade, which they continued until Jan. 3, 1876, when, purchasing his partner’s interest.,...

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Biography of Eugene B. Buck

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Eugene B. Buck, editor and proprietor of the Charleston Courier. Charleston; was born in Fayette Co., Ind., Oct. 12, 1834; when he was about five years old, his father’s family removed to McLean Co., Ill.; he served his apprenticeship to the printer’s trade in Bloomington; in 1852, he went to Peoria, Ill., and, in 1855, was connected with the publication of the Pekin Plaindealer; in 1856, he was associated with four other journeymen printers in running a co-operative daily paper in Peoria; in 1857, he conducted the Washington Advertiser, in Franklin Co., Mo.; in 1859, he edited the Daily Enterprise, in Decatur, Ill., and, in 1861 and 1862, the Magnet in that city; in 1864, he run the Constitution, a campaign paper, in Pontiac, Livingston Co., Ill., and, the next year-1865-he started the Bloomington Journal; in 1868, he became connected with the Charleston Courier, a live weekly newspaper and a vigorous advocate of the principles of the Democratic party, and, in 1874, became sole proprietor and editor; the esteem in which Mr. Buck is held by ,the editorial profession is manifest from the fact that, in 1865, he was chosen President of the Illinois Press Association, a member of the Executive Board in 1877, and is at present a Vice President of that body; he is...

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Biography of Samuel C. Miller

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel C. Miller as we have heretofore seen was one of the Walker Party, the first to discover gold in northern Arizona. He was the youngest member of this exploring band, and was, in many respects, a very remarkable man. He was born in Peoria, Illinois, November 4th, 1840. At the age of fifteen, he crossed the plains to the Pacific coast with his father and mother, making the entire journey on foot. He was naturally a frontiersman, which may account for the fact of his joining the Walker party at the age of twenty-one years to explore the wilderness of Arizona. During the days of Indian dominancy, he had many thrilling experiences with the savage tribes, the most notable of which was the killing of Wauba Yuba, at which time he was one of the largest freighters in the Territory, owning a large number of mule teams, and engaged in hauling from the Colorado River to the different army posts, mostly under Government contracts. During this time, he had many adventures with the Indians, the principal one, as has been noted, being the killing of Wauba Yuba, the Hualapai chief, the following account of which is taken from the Journal Miner of October 13th, 1909, and may be considered the personal statement of Mr. Miller...

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Biography of Charles Wesley Foster

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Wesley Foster, deceased, who was one of the public-spirited citizens of Page county, honored and respected wherever known but most of all where best known, was born May 19, 1833, in Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, where he acquired his education in the public schools. At the age of fifteen years he went to Peoria to learn the tinner’s trade and there remained for four years. When nineteen years of age he went to Abingdon, Illinois, and conducted the first hardware and tin store in that place. Four years later he removed to Bushnell, Illinois, where he also became the pioneer hardware merchant. It was during that period of his life that he was married on the 22nd of November, 1855 to Miss Elizabeth A. Latimer, of Abingdon, whose death occurred on the 2d of April, 1857. In the following month Mr. Foster removed to Clarinda, Iowa, and here opened a dry-goods store, which he conducted for two years. On the 1st of December 1859, he was married to Miss Ann L. Alden, who was born and reared in Ohio. They became the parents of four children Mary, the wife of John N. Miller: Julia, the wife of Herbert H. Scott; Harriett; and Annie, the wife of Alfred B. Loranz. All are yet residing in Clarinda....

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