Location: Peoria Illinois

Biography of Thomas Page

For upwards of half a century, Thomas Page has been one of the prominent commercial figures in Kansas. With possibly one exception, he is the oldest miller in the state, and for years has been a factor in the milling and grain interests and as much as any other individual has contributed to make Topeka a center for the manufacture of flour. A native of Scotland, he was born in the little manufacturing hamlet of Dunshalt in Fifeshire, September 3, 1843. With a practical schooling he began an apprenticeship in the milling business. For some time he was employed in a mill on the River Clyde, where he daily witnessed the arrival and departure of some of the great ocean vessels which brought to him all the sense of mystery and the messages of far off lands which the sight of them inspires. No doubt it was the vessels plying between America and Great Britain that gave him his first definite idea of making the United States his future home. It was in 1866, when he was twenty-three years of age, that he took passage on one of these vessels for America. Not long after his arrival he found employment at his trade in Albany, New York. Then in 1869 he started westward, for a short time worked in Peoria and for a longer time at Rockford, Illinois. At...

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Biography of John Gallup

John Gallup, assistant treasurer of the Missouri Portland Cement Company comes to the Mississippi valley from New England, where the family has been represented since early colonial days. He was born in Mystic, Connecticut, December 14, 1844, son of John Gallup and Roxanna Fish. He received his education in the public schools of Mystic, Connecticut, and also studied under private tutors. After leaving school he gave special attention to accounting and later was associated with his father in the lumber business. In Mystic, Connecticut, October 5, 1870, Mr. Gallup was married to Ellen E. Noyes, daughter of George W. and Prudence Dean Brown Noyes. One child was born to them, Mary Elisabeth, now the wife of Harry F. Roach of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1880, Mr. Gallup came to Peoria, Illinois, and there took charge of the office work of S. C. Bartlett & Company, grain dealers, and when the firm established a branch business at La Fayette, Indiana, he became office manager there and so continued for five years. In 1887 Mr. Gallup came to St. Louis and was offered the position of auditor and treasurer of the St. Louis, Kansas City and Colorado Railroad, a new line being built out of St. Louis to Kansas City. The Santa Fe afterward purchased the Frisco, when the management was merged into that of the Frisco. In October, 1895, Mr....

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Biography of Charles E. Schaff

Charles E. Schaff, receiver for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, was born on a farm in Licking county, Ohio. February 4, 1856. He is a son of the late Isaac M. Schaff, who was also born in the Buckeye state and represented one of the old families there of Dutch descent. In early life the father engaged in agricultural pursuits and later turned his attention to railroading, becoming connected with the train service of various roads. He passed away in Carroll county, Missouri, in 1888, aged fifty-seven years, having become a resident of Missouri four years before. He married Angeline Cleaves, a native of Maine and a representative of one of the old New England families of English lineage. She is now living in Columbus, Ohio. By her marriage she became the mother of seven sons and six daughters, of whom eight are living. Charles E. Schaff, the eldest of the family, was educated in private schools of Virginia and at the age of fourteen started out to provide for his own support. He was first employed as water boy on the Pennsylvania Railroad and initiated his business career with a wage of fifty cents per day. Later he took up railroading and was advanced through various parts of the train service, acting as supervisor and in various executive positions. His first official position was that of...

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Kickapoo Indians

Kickapoo Indians. From Kiwegapaw`, “he stands about,” “he moves about, standing now here, now there.” Also called: A’-uyax, Tonkawa name, meaning “deer eaters.” Higabu, Omaha and Ponca name. I’-ka-dŭ’, Osage name. Shake-kah-quah, Wichita name. Shígapo, Shikapu, Apache name. Sik’-a-pu, Comanche name. Tékapu, Huron name. Yuatara’ye-ru’nu, a second Huron name, meaning “tribe living around the lakes.” Kickapoo Connections. The Kickapoo belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock, and in a special group with the Foxes and Sauk. Kickapoo Villages. The villages were: Etnataek (shared with the Foxes), rather a fortification than a village, near the Kickapoo village on Sangamon River, Illinois. Kickspougowi, on the Wabash River in Crawford County, Illinois, about opposite the mouth of Turman Creek. Kickapoo Location. For territory occupied in Wisconsin, see History. (See also Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Oklahoma.) Kickapoo History. As suggested in the case of the Foxes, the Kickapoo may once have lived near the Sauk in the lower peninsula of Michigan but such a residence cannot be proven. If the name Outitcbakouk used by the Jesuit missionary Druillettes refers to this tribe, as seems probable, knowledge of them was brought to Europeans in 1658. At any rate they were visited by Allouez about 1667-70 and were then near the portage between Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, perhaps about Alloa, Columbia County, Wisconsin. Early in the eighteenth century a part of them settled somewhere...

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Biography of F. C. Amsbary

F. C. Amsbary, superintendent and manager of the Champaign Waterworks, has been superintending waterworks plants in different parts of the country for upwards of thirty years. It has in fact been his regular profession, though some of his younger years were devoted to railroading. Mr. Amsbary has numerous connections that identify him with the substantial interests of his home city. A native of Illinois, he was born at Pekin, January 24, 1863, a son of William Wallace and Harriet E. (Harlow) Amsbary, both of whom are natives of New York State. William W. Amsbary moved to Champaign in 1907, and for several years was connected with the waterworks here. He died in 1911, and his widow is still living at Champaign. Their five children are: George E., of Urbana; F. C.; Wallace Bruce, of Chicago; Don H., of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Cordelia, still at home with her mother. When F. C. Amsbary was four years of age his parents removed to Delavan in Tazewell County, Illinois. He attended the local schools there, and at the age of fifteen he left home and worked as clerk in a store at Tremont in the same county for two years. He then went to Peoria and acquired his initial experience in railroad offices, where he remained about three years. He was next at Council Bluffs, Iowa, in the Chicago Northwestern Railway offices...

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Biography of Felix G. Campbell

Felix G. Campbell was a thoroughly practical and successful farmer before he took up the business of real estate, loans and insurance at Champaign, and in both lines his success has been noteworthy. He is still a farmer through ownership, though no longer a worker in the fields, and he now gives all his time to an extensive clientage in real estate and insurance. Mr. Campbell was born in Preble County, Ohio, November 11, 1848, and was four years of age when his parents, John W. and Margaret N. (Dooley) Campbell, moved to Peoria, Illinois. His father was a native of Kentucky and his mother of Illinois. John W. Campbell spent his active career as a farmer, largely in Peoria County, and finally, when he and his wife retired, they went to live with their daughter Addie, at that time in Burton, Kansas, where both of them died. They were the parents of seven children: Mary E., David O., Charles L., Samuel, all deceased; Addie, wife of William H. Wilson of Wichita, Kansas; Felix G.; and George W. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Felix G. Campbell grew up on an Illinois farm, attended district schools, and remained at home until he was twenty-four. At that date he left home and lived on rented farms for about five years, when he bought eighty acres of his own and subsequently another eighty acres,...

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Biography of James J. Rogers

The life of James J. Rogers has not been one of unvarying monotony, circumscribed by the habits, thoughts and customs of some narrow community, but contains many interesting incidents that come with travel and extensive intercourse with the world. Born on the Atlantic coast, he has visited foreign lands, has viewed many of the interesting scenes of our own country, and is now located in the beautiful city of Boise, which nestles in one of the loveliest valleys of the Pacific slope. There he is successfully engaged in the practice of law, and in the political affairs of the state he is no unimportant factor. A native of Maryland, he was born in the city of Baltimore, on the 24th of July 1862, and is of Irish lineage. His parents, Joseph P. and Elizabeth (Donahue) Rogers, were both natives of Belfast, Ireland, and in 1858 crossed the Atlantic to Baltimore, where the father devoted his energies to bookkeeping. In politics he was a Democrat, and in religious belief both he and his wife were Catholics. His death occurred on the 14th of April 1895, when he had reached the age of sixty-two years, and his wife passed away on the 22d of February 1878, at the age of thirty-nine years. They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are residents of either Illinois or Iowa. During his...

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Biography of David Prager

David Prager. It was the influence of his personality and character as much as his successful business activities that made David Prager so useful and valuable a citizen of Fort Scott, where he resided for over forty years. His carcer illustrates the fact that the successful man is not necessarily the selfish man. He did not keep the resources of his heart nor of his material means to himself, but dispensed them with free hand among his family, his friends and the entire community. He was one of Fort Scott’s most beloved and best known citizens. David Prager was born in a village in Bavaria, Germany, June 7, 1834. He lived in Kansas from territorial days until his death at his home, 224 South Crawford Street, in Fort Scott, November 26, 1911. His death, due to heart failure, came suddenly, and though in his seventy-eighth year at the time, it was a heavy blow to the community. His early education was acquired in his native land. At the age of fifteen he came to the United States and joined an older brother at St. Louis. He also lived for a few years in Peoria and Alton, Illinois. On coming to this country he began an apprenticeship as a jeweler and goldsmith. He finished the apprenticeship at Alton, and in 1858 arrived at Lawrence, Kansas, then the chief center of...

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Biography of William T. Cohenour

William T. Cohenour, a prominent and well known representative of the automobile business in Muskogee, established his agency in 19 9 and through the intervening period ha s built up a substantial trade. He came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred in Pittsfield, Pike county, that state, on the 7th of March, 1877. He is a son of Howard A. and Mary (Cope) Cohenour. The father was a farmer and breeder of fine stock, making a specialty of cattle and hogs. William T. Cohenour was reared in his native state, spending his youthful days under the parental roof. He acquired a high school education and afterward continued his studies in the Bradley Technical Institute at Peoria, Illinois. In 1903 he came to Muskogee, where he has since made his home. Here he engaged in the retail jewelry business and his name has figured in connection with commercial activity in the city. When he first took up his abode here he purchased property and built the first store building at Porter, Oklahoma. In Muskogee he became identified with banking but since March, 1919, he has concentrated his efforts and attention upon the automobile business. For about three years he has given his attention to the sales of Chalmers and Maxwell cars and his annual patronage has become of a most gratifying character. He thoroughly knows the cars...

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Biography of Isaac E., Lambert, Sr.

Isaac E. Lambert, Sr., whose tragic death in the burning of the Copeland Hotel at Topeka in 1908 is generally recalled, was in his time one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas and stood in the forefront of his profession and also as a public leader. His son, Isaac E. Lambert, Jr., is also a lawyer, a resident of Emporia, and is now serving as chief clerk of the Kansas House of Representatives. At the time of his death Isaac E. Lambert, Sr., was fifty-five years of age and in the prime of his powers. He was born in Knoxville, Illinois, in 1853, spent his early youth there, and graduated LL. B. from the Northwestern University Law School at Chicago. He began practice in Peoria, Illinois, where for a time he was in the office of the noted Robert Ingersoll. Coming to Kansas in 1875 he located in Emporia and soon had acquired a reputation and successful general practice. He was especially noted as a criminal lawyer, though for many years his practice was corporation work. The Santa Fe Railroad Company employed him as its attorney with jurisdiction over twenty-two counties from Lyon County to the western limits of the state. He was also attorney for the National Hereford Association and for a number of other associations and corporations. He served at one time as United States district...

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Swinger, Polly Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. Polly Swiger, aged 81 years and 26 days, died at the Swiger residence near Union, Oregon, Sunday, October 9, 1910, and was buried from the Presbyterian church Wednesday, October 12, at 11 a.m. Polly Wilkinson was born in Jackson county, Ohio, September 29, 1829, and her early life was passed in the vicinity of Peoria, Ill. She was married to N. Swiger in 1851, and in 1858 moved from Illinois to Nebraska. In May, 1864, Mr. and Mrs. Swiger moved to Oregon, arriving in the Grande Ronde Valley, October 9, of that year. From June 1865, to October 1869 they lived in the Williamette valley, after which they moved to the Grande Ronde Valley and have lived here since, spending the time from 1869 to 1889 in High Valley, and since that time at the Swiger home near Union. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Swiger, four of whom are living, namely: William, of Union; Mrs. Viola Cochran, of Washington; Nora Rumbley, of Pine Valley, and Elmer Swiger, of Union. Four brothers and one sister survive Mrs. Swiger. “Death of Mrs. Polly Swiger” Obituaries and Other Vital Records of Union County, Oregon. 1890 – 1930. Compiled by Clara Cline Lee. Reproduced by Walter M. Pierce Library, Eastern Oregon Library, 1972. “Funeral Notice”     Mrs. Polly Swiger, age 81 years and 26 days, died at the family residence...

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Swiger, Polly Mrs. – Obituary

Union, Union County, Oregon Mrs. Polly Swiger, aged 81 years and 26 days, died at the Swiger residence near Union, Oregon, Sunday, October 9, 1910, and was buried from the Presbyterian church Wednesday, October 12, at 11 a. m. Polly Wilkinson was born in Jackson county, Ohio, September 29, 1829, and her early life was passed in the vicinity of Peoria, Ill. She was married to N. Swiger in 1851, and in 1858 moved from Illinois to Nebraska. In May, 1864, Mr. and Mrs. Swiger moved to Oregon, arriving in the Grande Ronde Valley, October 9, of that year. From June 1865, to October 1869 they lived in the Williamette valley, after which they moved to the Grande Ronde Valley and have lived here since, spending the time from 1869 to 1889 in High Valley, and since that time at the Swiger home near Union. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Swiger, four of whom are living, namely: William, of Union; Mrs. Viola Cochran, of Washington; Nora Rumbley, of Pine Valley, and Elmer Swiger, of Union. Four brothers and one sister survive Mrs. Swiger. Contributed by: Larry...

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Wicks, H. Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. H. Wicks Passed This Life Sunday Noon Another pioneer was called to the beyond this week when Mrs. H. Wicks died at her ranch home east of North Powder, Sunday morning, June 21. Mrs. Wicks had been in ill health for the past two years, and for the past several months, had been bedfast, and while her death was not unexpected, yet it cast a gloom over the entire community. She will be missed by her many friends and acquaintances, many of whom had known her for the 43 years she has spent in this section. Mrs. Wicks was born in Ireland and had she lived until the 15th of August would have been 86 years of age. She came to this country when four years old. She was married to Harrison Wicks in Peoria, Illinois, and they together with their family crossed the plains, and came directly to North Powder, where with the exception of a short stay in the Willamette valley, they have since resided. Mr. Wicks died about four years ago, and since that time Mrs. Wicks began to fail, sadly missing her companion of many years. Five children survive their mother. They are James E. and Clarence Wicks of North Powder, Mrs. Mary Nice and Mrs. Katie Carnes of this city, and Mrs. Belle Daugherty of Junction City. Funeral services were held from the...

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Wilkinson, John – Obituary

Forty-two years a resident of Union county, Oregon, was John Wilkinson, who was born July 30, 1839, in Peoria, Illinois, and died in Walla Walla, Washington, where he went three weeks before for treatment in a hospital in that city. At the age of two years, he, with his parents, went to Missouri, where they remained eight years, then to the old Illinois home till 1858, when he started westward, spending four years with headquarters in Nebraska, freighting on the plains as far as Denver. In 1864, he, together with his father, mother, five brothers and three sisters and a large number of others, with a “prairie schooner” train, being himself chosen the captain, crossed the Rockies and on into the then wild Oregon, settling in High Valley, a few miles from this city, which has been his home until his death. He was married at Cove in 1873, to Sarah Vansel. To them were born four children-Joseph E. Wilkinson and Mrs. William Haggerty, who remain to mourn the loss of their honored father, Charles H. , who died ten years ago, and the beautiful and loved Grace E., who died June 10 of the present year. Others remaining are the wife and one step-daughter, Mrs. Chas. Fleetwood, of Hereford, five brothers and two sisters, but one sister of this family having preceded him to the long home. Mr....

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O’Farrell, James R. – Obituary

James R. O’Farrell, 80, a native of Orting and a former Pierce County commissioner, died Friday night [September 25, 1953] at his home in Orting. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert O’Farrell, were pioneers in area, taking up a 120-acre homestead in the Puyallup Valley in 1870. Mr. O’Farrell was the last of four sons of the pioneers. He married Lena Bruce of Tacoma in 1898 and they set up housekeeping in Orting. For many years he was active in community and political affairs. He served at various times as mayor, councilman and school director in Orting and from 1916 to 1922 was a county commissioner. From 1924 to 1940 he served as manager of the Bureau of Credit and Collections for the Caterpillar Tractor Co. in Peoria, Ill. In 1940 he became assistant secretary for the Caterpillar Military Engine Co. in Decatur, Ill. He spent the latter years of the war with the War Production Board in Washington, D. C. In 1946 Mr. O’Farrell returned to Orting to take up active management of the Orting Funeral Home, which he had owned for more than 50 years. Since his retirement in 1949 he has spent much time traveling about the country. Survivors include his wife, Lena; two daughters, Mrs. Ruth E. Fair of Denver and Mrs. Edna Mendonca of Richmond, Calif.; a son, Norman of Bellevue and three grandchildren....

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