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Location: Peoria County IL

Biography of Samuel C. Miller

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel C. Miller as we have heretofore seen was one of the Walker Party, the first to discover gold in northern Arizona. He was the youngest member of this exploring band, and was, in many respects, a very remarkable man. He was born in Peoria, Illinois, November 4th, 1840. At the age of fifteen, he crossed the plains to the Pacific coast with his father and mother, making the entire journey on foot. He was naturally a frontiersman, which may account for the fact of his joining the Walker party at the age of twenty-one years to explore the wilderness of Arizona. During the days of Indian dominancy, he had many thrilling experiences with the savage tribes, the most notable of which was the killing of Wauba Yuba, at which time he was one of the largest freighters in the Territory, owning a large number of mule teams, and engaged in hauling from the Colorado River to the different army posts, mostly under Government contracts. During this time, he had many adventures with the Indians, the principal one, as has been noted, being the killing of Wauba Yuba, the Hualapai chief, the following account of which is taken from the Journal Miner of October 13th, 1909, and may be considered the personal statement of Mr. Miller...

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Biography of Charles Wesley Foster

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Wesley Foster, deceased, who was one of the public-spirited citizens of Page county, honored and respected wherever known but most of all where best known, was born May 19, 1833, in Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, where he acquired his education in the public schools. At the age of fifteen years he went to Peoria to learn the tinner’s trade and there remained for four years. When nineteen years of age he went to Abingdon, Illinois, and conducted the first hardware and tin store in that place. Four years later he removed to Bushnell, Illinois, where he also became the pioneer hardware merchant. It was during that period of his life that he was married on the 22nd of November, 1855 to Miss Elizabeth A. Latimer, of Abingdon, whose death occurred on the 2d of April, 1857. In the following month Mr. Foster removed to Clarinda, Iowa, and here opened a dry-goods store, which he conducted for two years. On the 1st of December 1859, he was married to Miss Ann L. Alden, who was born and reared in Ohio. They became the parents of four children Mary, the wife of John N. Miller: Julia, the wife of Herbert H. Scott; Harriett; and Annie, the wife of Alfred B. Loranz. All are yet residing in Clarinda....

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Biography of O. A. Kimball

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In a history of the business development of Clarinda and Page county mention should be made of O. A. Kimball, who for some years figured prominently in connection with the lumber trade and later with the agricultural interests of the community. He was born in New Hampshire in 1835 and was a son of Edwin and Elizabeth (Prescott) Kimball, both of whom were natives of New England. The father followed the occupation of farming in New Hampshire, where both he and his wife died. The Kimball family was established on American soil in the early period in the colonization of the new world, and representatives of the name served as loyal soldiers in the Revolutionary war. O. A. Kimball was reared in his native state, remaining in New Hampshire until nineteen years of age. In the meantime he attended the Pembroke Academy, thus supplementing his early public-school education. At nineteen years of age he went to Peoria, Illinois, where he spent two years in working at the carpenter’s trade. On the expiration of that period he came to Clarinda in 1857 and here embarked in the lumber business, hauling his first load of lumber from Council Bluffs. He was in partnership with Charles P. Osgood and the enterprise which they established and for some time conducted...

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