Location: Penacook New Hampshire

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and saw what they had for supper that night. They however did not discover themselves till the second day after. They probably wished to take a little time to learn the strength and preparation of the inhabitants. The next day, Mrs. M’Coy, attended by their two dogs, went down to see if any of the other families had returned from the garrison. She found no one. On her return, as...

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Biography of Hon. John C. Linehan

Hon. John C. Linehan . – “A hundred years after the Puritans and Pilgrims made a settlement on the coast of New England there came to this country a multitude of emigrants, mostly from the north of Ireland, who soon became absorbed into the ranks of the first settlers, and became the very best of citizens. In the contest for independence they rendered the most efficient services to the colonies, as they had previously done in protecting the frontiers from the inroads of the Indians. After another century, our doors having been opened wide for the reception of people from every country, there came to these shores a tide of emigration from Central and Southern Ireland, which seemed at one time as if it would depopulate the Emerald Isle. In numbers like the countless hosts of the Goths and Vandals who overran the Roman Empire, but pacific in their intentions, they sought in America homes for themselves and their children, where, under the flag and protection of the young republic, they could enjoy that liberty which had been denied them in their old home, and secure those advantages which thrift and industry offered in the New World. “When the country of their adoption was in danger from organized rebellion, none hastened to its defence with more zeal and courage than these newly made citizens. In the baptism of blood...

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Biography of William H. Carter

William H. Carter, a thrifty farmer of Canterbury and a son of John and Lydia (Gill) Carter, was born December 20, 1842. His grandfather, Nathan Carter, who was born in Boscawen, N.H., April 6, 1762, lived in this town all his life. Nathan carried on farming, and conducted a tavern, and died September 21, 1841. His wife, Sarah, died May 8, 1845. They had five children, namely: Judith, born December 5, 1787, who married John French, and died December 13, 1871; Moses, born August 6, 1790, who died May 30, 1851; John, born December 10, 1797, the father of the subject of this sketch; Jeremiah, born February 20, 1803, who died in 1871; and Nathan, born February 4, 1807, who died February 16, 1875. John Carter in his younger days was employed in rafting lumber down the river, although his main business was farming. He resided at different times in Boscawen, East Concord, and Canterbury, and died August 12, 1871. His wife’s death occurred February 4, 1890. They had six children: Bradbury G., born February 3, 1827, who married Asenath Spiller, and is now a widower living in Concord; Luther, born August 24, 1829, who married Mary Ann Coffin, and is engaged in the shoe business in Newburyport, Mass.; John, born March 25, 1832, who died in 1833; John (second), born March 15, 1834, who married Julia Bryant, and...

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Biography of Hon. Edmund H. Brown

Hon. Edmund H. Brown, the subject of this sketch, was born in Fisherville, now Penacook, a part of Concord, N.H., October 29, 1857. He is the youngest son of Henry Hayes and Lucretia (Symonds) Brown, and traces his ancestry directly back to the early Pilgrim settlers. The late Henry H. Brown, father of Edmund H., conducted an extensive manufacturing business in Penacook for many years, and was one of the most enterprising citizens and prominent residents of that village in his day. Edmund H. Brown was educated at the Penacook Academy and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. After completing his studies he entered the works of the Concord Axle Company, and, having applied his efforts to a thorough mastery of every branch of these extensive works, fitted himself for the responsible position which he assumed in 1887, that of General Superintendent. He was one of the incorporators of this company, and is a member of the Board of Directors. Aside from his connection with the axle works, he was one of the organizers of and Director in the Penacook Electric Light Company, and was instrumental in giving to his Early in the spring of 1897 he became associated with Mr. Charles E. Foote in the well-known house of Foote, Brown & Co., having purchased a half – interest from Mr. Stewart I. Brown. This firm carries one of...

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Biography of David Arthur Brown

David Arthur Brown, Manager and Treasurer of the Concord Axle Company of Penacook, an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in Attleboro, Mass., May 14, 1839, son of Henry H. and Mary Ann (Daggett) Brown. His parents were natives of Attleboro. On the father’s side he is descended from an Englishman who settled in Massachusetts in the year 1624. His great-grandfather was John Brown, and his grandfather was David Brown. On the mother’s side his genealogy is traced through her father, Otis Daggett, of the seventh generation, Joab of the sixth, John of the fifth, Ebenezer of the fourth, John of the third, and Thomas of the second, to the first John, of Martha’s Vineyard, who, born in England, came to this country in 1630 with Governor Winthrop, of whom he is said to have been a relation. David Arthur Brown was educated in the public schools of Penacook and at the academy in New London, N.H., completing his studies at the age of nineteen. At intervals in the period of his school life he worked with his father in the cotton-mill at Penacook. Later he entered the repair shops, where he remained until the outbreak of the Civil War. In August, 1861, being a proficient band musician, he enlisted as a leader of the band connected with the Third...

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Biography of Hon. John Whitaker

Hon. John Whitaker, a retired lumber dealer of Penacook and ex-member of the State Senate, was born in Hopkinton, N.H., June 9, 1835, son of John and Hannah (Bickford) Whitaker. He is a descendant of one of three brothers who emigrated from England in the early days. His paternal great-grandfather, serving as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, participated in the battle of Bunker Hill, and was present at the surrender of Burgoyne. Peter Whitaker, the grandfather, a native of Deering, N.H., was a prosperous farmer. John Whitaker, Sr., Mr. Whitaker’s father, first enlisted for three months’ service in the War of 1812. Upon the expiration of that term he re-enlisted for three years. In civil life he was chiefly occupied in agriculture. He met his death in a conflagration, which destroyed his dwelling and its contents in 1856. John Whitaker was educated in the public and private schools of Hopkinton. After leaving school at the age of sixteen, his first occupation was driving a coach and assisting in an express business. In 1858 he opened a livery stable in Penacook upon his own account, and subsequently carried it on for four years. In 1864 he entered the lumber business in company with G. F. Sanborn, who withdrew at the end of one year. He then formed a partnership with H. H. Amsden and B. F. Caldwell, under the...

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Biography of Anson Colby Alexander, M.D.

Anson Colby Alexander, M.D., a prominent homoeopathic physician of Penacook, was born in Littleton, N.H., October 10, 1855, son of Wesley and Sarah B. (Bray) Alexander. Both paternal and maternal ancestors of his served in the War for Independence. Wesley Alexander, a native of Swanzey, N.H., was a prominent resident of Littleton, and took an active part in public affairs. He was one of the original promoters of the Republican movement in this State, having formerly been a supporter of the Whig party. For more than thirty years he used his influence successfully in securing the predominance of these parties in Littleton. His wife, Sarah, was a native of Harrison, Me. Anson Colby Alexander acquired his early education in the public schools and at the New Hampton and New London Academies. His medical studies were begun under the instruction of Drs. Daniel Lee Jones and Charles W. Rowell, both of Lancaster, N.H. He graduated from the Philadelphia School of Anatomy and Surgery in 1879 and from the Hahnemann Medical College of the same city in 1880. He also graduated from the Penn 1881 he began the practice of his profession in Penacook. Since then he has acquired a wide reputation as a skilful and thoroughly reliable physician. He is a trustee of the New Hampshire Savings Bank. On June 22, 1882, Dr. Alexander was united in marriage with Fanny...

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Biography of George Whitefield Abbott

George Whitefield Abbott, of Penacook, President of the J. E. Symonds Table Company, cabinetmakers, was born in West Boscawen, now Webster, N.H., on March 13, 1837. His parents were Nathaniel and Mary (Fitts) Abbott, the former a resident of West Boscawen and the latter of Sandown, N.H. George W. Abbott in his youth, after attending the public schools of Warner, completed his education at a private academy in West Salisbury, N.H. He went immediately to Boston, Mass., where he was employed as a clerk until 1861, when he came to Penacook, N.H., to engage in the grocery business with his brother, under the firm name of H. & G. W. Abbott. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, going directly to St. Augustine, Fla., remaining until May, 1863. From that city he went to Morris Island, South Carolina, being engaged all summer at Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Sumter. He then went to St. Helena, S.C.; and in February, 1864, General Truman Seymour, the objective point of which was Lake City, Fla. Severely wounded at the battle of Olustee, Fla., on February 20, he was obliged to stay in the hospital until April, 1865, shortly before the close of the war. Later he was returned to his regiment, and mustered out at Goldsboro, N.C., in June, 1865. Mr. Abbott then returned to Penacook, and...

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Biography of Marc Joseph Tetreault

MARC JOSEPH TETREAULT – The main interest that centers in the industrious career of Mr. Tetreault is the dominating quality of perseverance, most exemplary throughout his life, whose success from the start was absolutely dependent upon his own efforts. His belief in performing well the work at hand is paramount, and his record of industry is one that exhibits a wholesome readiness to assume the task and the burden of many trades in order eventually to arrive at a hoped-for goal. When twenty-six years ago, he discovered the road to his vocation, it proved the beginning of a lucrative venture that should emerge in the present extensive horse mart at Greenfield, that has a repute for excellence that is not limited to the western part of the State. His square dealing with the public in all his business activities has brought the desired result of his independent and progressive establishment. He is a son of Isaac and Honorine (Lefebre) Tetreault, both of Canada, the genealogy of three generations of the paternal line being as follows (I) John Baptiste Tetreault, who was born in Quebec, Canada, spent his entire life there as a farmer, and died in the town of Ely, Quebec, at the age of eighty-five years. His children were: John B.; Isaac, of further mention; Marcelle; Timothy; Joseph, and Salime. (II) Isaac Tetreault, son of John Baptiste Tetreault,...

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